Course

BIO 142†† Organismal Biology

Professor

William Maple

CRN

17121

 

Schedule

Wed Fr†††††† 10:30 - 12:30 pmHegeman 102

 

Lab A: Th†† 1:30 -5:00 pm††††† Rose 306

or

Lab B: Fr†† 1:30 -5:00 pm††††† Rose 306

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Laboratory Science

An introduction to organismal biology and ecology, primarily for those who intend to continue in biology; also open to interested students not majoring in science. Topics include population genetics, evolution, vertebrate embryology and anatomy, and animal phylogeny, taxonomy, and ecology. Biology 142 may be taken before Biology 141, if necessary. Students majoring in biology are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 142 concurrently. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses.On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 144†† Biostatistics

Professor

Matthew Deady

CRN

17122

 

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††† 8:30 - 10:20 am†† Albee 106

Distribution

OLD: E/Q

NEW: Mathematics & Computing

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society

This course provides a background in (1) the basic methods of data analysis for biologists, (2) applications of mathematics to the description of biological phenomena, and (3) the generation of testable hypotheses from models of biological processes. The goal of this course is to give students a general idea of what statistical methods are commonly used in biology, which methods are appropriate for which types of data, and to provide an in-depth examination of how the methods work. Among topics covered are elementary probability and statistics, fitting and hypothesis testing, characteristics of frequency distributions, regression analysis, and some multivariate based methods. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses.On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 146†† Earth & Life through Time

Professor

Catherine O'Reilly

CRN

17123

 

Schedule

Wed Fr†††††† 9:00 - 10:20 am†† Olin 205

Lab:Tu†††† 1:30 -5:00 pm††††† Rose 306

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

The course provides an introduction to our dynamic earth on its true timescale. We will examine physical processes operating on the earth and how it has changed since its formation. This includes longer time scale processes like climate change and glaciation as well as hazards such as volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, and meteorite impacts. We will weave in the beginning of life, its consequences for the earth, evolution, and extinction. Labs will involve field trips to local sites of geologic interest. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses. On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 151†† From Genes to Traits

Professor

Michael Tibbetts

CRN

17124

 

Schedule

Mon Wed†† 3:00 -4:20 pm††††† Hegeman 102

Lab: Mon†† 9:00 - 12:00 pm†† Rose 306

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Laboratory Science

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society

This course takes an introductory look at the relationships between genetics, environment, and biochemistry. It is intended for students with a strong interest in science and is appropriate for biology majors. The course will begin with an examination of heredity in both classical and modern molecular contexts. It will then focus on the relationships between genes and proteins, and the complex biochemical interactions that produce a phenotype. The course will culminate in a discussion of the ways in which the environment interacts with multiple genes to influence complex traits, for example schizophrenia, and the modern methods applied to the problem of identifying the genetic components of these traits. The laboratory will provide an opportunity to examine some of the principles discussed in the lecture in more detail and to become acquainted with some of the methodologies and instrumentation found in a modern biology laboratory.Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses, and experience in high school biology and chemistry.On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 202†† Ecology and Evolution

Professor

Felicia Keesing

CRN

17125

 

Schedule

Wed Fr†††††† 10:30 - 11:50 amOlin LC 115

 

Lab A: Th†† 1:30 -3:30 pm Hegeman 308

or

Lab B: Fr†† 1:30 -3:30 pm††††† Hegeman 308

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding. Offered every spring. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Eukaryotic Genetics (Biology 201). On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 204†† Human Physiology

Professor

John Ferguson

CRN

17126

 

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††† 1:30 -3:30 pm††††† Preston 110

Lab: Wed†† 1:30 -4:20 pm††††† Rose 306

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

The focus of this course is the relationship between the physical and chemical functions of various organs and organ systems to overall homeostasis, with an emphasis on human physiology. Systems examined include the central and peripheral nervous systems, muscle, the heart and blood vessels, blood, the lungs, the kidneys, the digestive system, the endocrine glands, and the reproductive systems. Laboratory work provides practical experience in relevant topics of human physiology. This course is appropriate for those interested in a career in the health professions and others interested in animal biology. Prerequisites: Biology 141-142, Chemistry 141-142; Chemistry 201-202 is recommended concurrently. On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 211†† Metabolic Disease

Professor

Robert Cutler

CRN

17127

 

Schedule

Fr††††††††††††††† 2:20 -4:20 pm††††† Hegeman 201

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

(2 credits) This course will examine human metabolism through instances in which it fails to function correctly.Some diseases with direct bearing on human metabolism include leptin deficiency, severe childhood epilepsy, hyper- and hypocholesterolemia, type I and II diabetes, hypogonadism, and more complex disease states such as Syndrome X and morbid obesity.Although some familial instances of these diseases do occur and have been attributed to the loss of single genes, others such as Syndrome X occur in up to 25% of the population and are most likely the result of multiply interacting factors.The environmental versus genetic components of these diseases as well as methods to regulate the metabolic system such as diet composition, exercise, and medication will also be discussed.During the semester we will visit several researchers at Rockefeller University who have been responsible for key insights into these processes. (Limited to 8 students)

Prerequisites: BIO 201 or permission of instructor.On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 304†† Cell Biology

Professor

Michael Tibbetts

CRN

17128

 

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††† 9:00 - 10:20 am†† Hegeman 300

Th†††††††††††† 4:00 -6:00 pm††††† Hegeman 300

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

This course examines the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in processes relating to eukaryotic cellular organization, communication, movement, reproduction, and death. These topics are considered through close reading of the primary and secondary literatures.Discussions of review articles on particular topics precede in-depth discussions of one or more research articles in those areas. The literature is read with the objective of understanding the current models describing cellular processes, as well as the experimental rationale and the modern techniques used to probe fundamental cellular mechanisms and test the models. The laboratory consists of a semester-long project in which a cellular process is investigated. Offered in alternate spring semesters. Prerequisites: Biology 201-202, and Chemistry 201-202.

On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 310†† Prokaryotic & Viral Genetics

Professor

John Ferguson

CRN

17129

 

Schedule

Mon Wed†† 8:30 - 10:20 am†† Olin 309

Mon††††††††††† 1:30 -5:00 pm††††† Rose 306

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

Considers biological inheritance in prokaryotes (bacteria) and their viruses (bacteriophages). Lectures alternate with student presentations of fundamental papers in chronological order. Topics include mutagenesis and repair, plasmids, conjugation, transformation, intemperate and temperate phages, transduction, transposition and nonhomologous recombination,homologous recombination, and the regulation of gene expression. Laboratory work provides practical experience in the topics covered. Offered in alternate spring semesters. Prerequisite: BIO 201, BIO 303, and CHEM 201-202. On-line registration

 

Course

BIO 415†† Advanced Seminar in Ecology

Professor

Catherine O'Reilly

CRN

17130

 

Schedule

Th†††††††††††††† 2:30 - 5:30 pm††††† Olin 309

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW: N/A

Stable isotopes provide a simple approach to many environmental questions that might otherwise be difficult to answer and are used as a tool in fields such as paleoclimatology, forensics, archaeology, and ecology. This class will cover some of the ways that oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes can be used to study nutrient sources, biochemical processes, and food web interactions. These tools provide a straightforward way to address questions such as: How do we know that tequila hasnít been altered by adding alcohol from grain?; Did our early ancestors grow fat on meat or milk or each other? Is ocean productivity declining in the North Pacific?; How do we know what the earthís past climate was like? The class will be based primarily on student presentation and discussion of current literature to learn about different uses of stable isotopes. Students will do a small isotope project that they will present at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: Chem 142 and permission of the instructor. On-line registration