Course

BGIA 319   Issues in Global Public Health

Professor

Julie Becker / Kate Bourne

CRN

17513

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

This course provides a general overview of determinants of health in the developing world and principles within the field of global public health. It will include a review of some current and historical public health problems, such as tuberculosis, malaria, AIDS, small pox, maternal and infant mortality and reproductive health and rights, and the approaches used to understand and address them. Students will also examine the roles of a range of international organizations involved in global public health efforts, including local and international non-governmental organizations, multilateral agencies such as the WHO, UNAIDS, bilateral organizations like the CDC and USAID, governments and donor organizations. The course aims to convey an understanding of the complexity of health problems in developing countries, the impact of health on social and economic development, the contributions of various disciplines and analytical perspectives in decision-making about public health priorities, and the range of players that contribute to developing and implementing the programs to address them. The course will be structured primarily around a series of case studies of public health policies and practices around which there has been controversy or debate about the appropriate course of action. The case studies will include a major focus on HIV/AIDS and sexual and reproductive health, and will examine such issues as quarantine, testing of new technologies on vulnerable populations, commitment of resources to treatment versus prevention, and the influence of conflicting "moralities" on public health program approaches. These debates will examine the tensions that sometimes arise between efforts to ensure public health and safety, while promoting health equity and rights. It will incorporate perspectives of stakeholders in the developing world, as well as scientists, policy makers and activists. The analysis and readings will draw from various disciplines, including epidemiology and medical anthropology.

 

Course

BGIA 326  Trends in International Terrorism and Counterterrorism

Professor

Thomas Parker

CRN

17515

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

This course charts the rise of international terrorism and examines State responses to this evolving threat. Seminars will consider case studies drawn from Europe, Africa and the Middle East. The course aims to give students a deeper understanding of the circumstances that motivate terrorist groups and the means and methods available to States seeking to contain or defeat them.

Course

BGIA 330 Writing on  International Affairs

Professor

Andrew Nagorski

CRN

17511

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

This course will look at a representative sampling of articles and books by journalists about foreign affairs, and will include discussions with experienced reporters and editors about their work. But this is primarily a writing course, and students will be expected to write an article every week. Their assignments will include news stories, travel pieces, profiles, op-eds and review essays. They will discuss each other’s writing in class, and they will learn about editing and revising their stories. They will also be encouraged to submit a finished article for publication.

 

Course

BGIA 334   International Human Rights: Sources and Applications

Professor

Alan Sussman

CRN

17512

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

The language of rights, since the 17th century, has played a pivotal role in political discourse, and since the end of the Second World War has assumed an increasingly important position in international law as well. Rights are normally invoked to assert fundamental claims of human dignity or liberty which impose limits upon social and governmental power and control. But upon what authority do rights exist? This is the principal question to be addressed in this course, which will be approached from political, philosophical and legal perspectives. In charting the transformation of natural law to natural rights and human rights, we will read a number of essential works by Cicero, Grotius, Locke, Constant, and Kant, modern observers including Dworkin, Sen, and Meron, and foundational documents such as the United States Bill of Rights, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man, the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Charter of the Nuremberg Tribunal. In the latter part of the course we will read and discuss recent decisions issued by international courts concerning matters of torture, rape, and crimes against humanity and consider the complex relationship among individual responsibilities, obligations of the state and the status of rights in international law.

 

Course

BGIA 338  Science, Change, and International Relations

Professor

Giles Alston

CRN

17514

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

At the heart of this course is the changing relationship between government policy and science and technology (S&T), and how a new set of transnational issues that are very different from traditional concerns of war, peace and prosperity are testing the limitations of a state-centric order. The course has three components. We begin by looking at how S&T fits into the main paradigms of international relations, how aspects of S&T policy have become more influential since the 19th century, and how the informal international networks of scientists gained substantial policy influence in the twentieth century. We then spend several weeks on detailed case study of how, over the last half-century, the exploration and utilisation of space has mirrored developments in international relations. Starting with the bipolar nature of the original ‘space race’, we look at the need to impress new states emerging from decolonisation, the movement towards multi-polarity and the rise of the European Union as a political actor, the extraordinary change of status that came with the end of the USSR, and the changing perceptions needed to accommodate the ambitions of a new tier of countries led by China and Brazil – all of which are reflected in changing civil space policy. We end this section by looking at the growing commercial activity in space and the challenge it poses to the traditional supervision of this sector by the UN – is one of the last areas of state-central monopoly about to fall, is and what does that mean for the shape of international relations in the next decades? In the third section of the course, we look at a number of transnational issues that have a strong S&T component are changing the way in which central issues are tackled. In particular, we will analysis the mechanisms that have grown up to address four issues – regulation of the Internet, AIDS alleviation, the response to climate change, and carbon sequestration. All of these have produced, to a greater or lesser degree, a creative tension between traditional models of how governments and supra-national bodies respond to such challenges, and the dynamics of recent trends related to globalization that make greater use of the non-government and private sectors. The standard question of how states relate to each other is increasingly being joined by a newer question -- one that is now the subject of some interesting literature, and one that tends to be asked by organisations that are based in New York rather than Washington: who should respond to challenges to human security that are global in scope, and who should regulate technology that does not – cannot -- recognise boundaries. The first part of the course looks at how states controlled S&T policy in the past; the second looks at how that approach needs to change in a world where the challenges as well as the opportunities have been globalised.

 

Course

BGIA 360  The Architecture of International Affairs: Advanced Theory and Practice

Professor

Jonathan Cristol

CRN

17516

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

This upper-level seminar will begin with a look at varying theories of international relations, with an emphasis on modern works and articles of particular importance to international relations in the post Cold War and post 9/11 era. We will examine to what extent, if any, the role of theory plays in the practice of international affairs. In the second half of the course we will start by learning about how American foreign policy is made and carried out. For most of the second half, we will discuss multilateralism and how the major international organizations (particularly, but not exclusively, the United Nations and World Trade Organization) actually function. The “nuts and bolts” of foreign affairs. The goal of the class is to develop an advanced understanding of how foreign policy and the international system operate in theory and practice. A basic knowledge of international relations theory is helpful, but not required. Authors to be read include: Francis Fukuyama, Samuel Huntington, Christopher Layne, John Mearsheimer, Bruce Russett, and William Wohlforth.

 

Course

BGIA TUT  Core Seminar

Professor

Richard Harrill

CRN

17510

 

Schedule

TBA

The Core Seminar is divided into two parts: 1) major topics in global affairs; and 2) research and writing related to the specific professional internship that the student is undertaking for the duration of the semester. As such, the Core Seminar bridges BGIA’s formal and non-formal educational program, providing students with opportunities to explore major issues in international affairs and providing them with an academic framework to contextualize their professional internship experiences. The format challenges students to develop skills in critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and written and oral expression. The Core Seminar is divided into two parts: 1) major topics in global affairs; and 2) research and writing related to the specific professional internship that the student is undertaking for the duration of the semester. As such, the Core Seminar bridges BGIA’s formal and non-formal educational program, providing students with opportunities to explore major issues in international affairs and providing them with an academic framework to contextualize their professional internship experiences. The format challenges students to develop skills in critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and written and oral expression.