Course

SOC 101   Introduction to Sociology

Professor

Amy Ansell

CRN

16047

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   1:30  -2:50 pm     OLIN 203

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Social Science

Cross listed: American Studies, Environmental Studies

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the sociological perspective. Its goal is to illuminate the way in which social forces impinge on our individual lives and affect human society. The course is organized into four main parts. In the first, key sociological concepts and methods will be introduced via the study of the ‘fathers’ of sociology: Durkheim, Weber, and Marx. In the second part, we will examine the significance of various forms of social inequality, particularly those based on class, race, and gender. We will then survey several important social institutions: the family, the economic order, and education. The fourth and final part of the course will focus on the inter-related issues of social movements and social change.  On-line

 

Course

SOC 205   Introduction to Research Methods

Professor

Yuval Elmelech

CRN

16048

 

Schedule

Tu Th          10:30  - 11:50 am   OLIN 107 or HDRANX 106

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  Environmental Studies, Human Rights, Social Policy

The aim of this course is to enable students to understand and use the various research methods developed in the social sciences, with an emphasis on quantitative methods. The course will be concerned with the theory and rationale upon which social research is based, as well as the practical aspects of research and the problems the researcher is likely to encounter. The course is divided into two parts. In the first, we will learn how to formulate research questions and hypotheses, how to choose the appropriate research method for the problem, and how to maximize chances for valid and reliable findings. In the second part, we will learn how to perform simple data analysis and how to interpret and present findings in a written report. For a final paper, students use survey data on topics such as attitudes toward abortion, sexual attitudes, affirmative action, racism, sex roles, religiosity, and political affiliation. By the end of the semester, students will have the necessary skills for designing and conducting independent research for term papers and senior projects, as well as for non-academic enterprises. Prospective students should speak with instructor prior to registration. On-line
 

 

Course

HIST / SOC 214   American Immigration

Professor

Joel Perlmann

CRN

16053

 

Schedule

Tu Th          4:30  -5:50 pm     OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science / Rethinking Difference

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies, Human Rights, SRE

This course examines the huge contemporary immigration

 (since the 1960s) -- its effect on both the immigrants and the society they have entered.    Throughout, we will ask how the present American experience is similar to, and how it differs from, the earlier American experience as "a country of immigrants"; to this end, we will compare the present to the last great period of American immigration, 1890-1920.   We will also cast a comparative eye on the contemporary European experience with immigration.   Specific topics include 1) immigrant origins and reasons for coming, because today great numbers enter the upper-middle class and millions more enter (as in the past) at the bottom of the economic ladder;  2) immigrants’ efforts to preserve or shed cultural distinctiveness and ethnic unity;  3) how the children of the immigrants are faring; 4) American politics and legislation around immigration restriction 4) the economic and cultural impact of the immigrants on American society and 5) how a largely-non-white immigrant population is influencing the political culture of American racial divisions and the economic position of the native-born poor, among whom blacks are especially concentrated.    Readings will be mostly from social science and history but will also include memoirs, fiction, and policy debates.  On-line

 

Course

SOC 246   Race & Ethnicity: The Key Concepts

Professor

Amy Ansell

CRN

16051

 

Schedule

Tu Th          1:00  -2:20 pm     ASP 302

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science / Rethinking Difference

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, Human Rights, SRE

Although it is popular today to celebrate the existence of a “post-racial” world, many in the academy concur that it is a world still in the making.  Race continues to affect the social world and the people who inhabit it in multiple ways.  Given the unfulfilled promises of a post-racist world and the sheer ubiquity of race matters, it is more crucial than ever to carefully understand the variety and particularity of meanings and uses with which the concepts have been historically associated.  The course aims to situate the study of race and ethnicity within its own historical and intellectual context and, in so doing, expose students to the broad diversity of scholarship in the field and convey the excitement and challenge of the enterprise.  Its purpose is to provide students with an understanding of the conceptual evolution of key terms, the variety of meanings with which the concepts have been historically associated, and the differing ways in which the concepts are deployed or remain pertinent in current debates.  Key concepts surveyed include: race formation, ethnic identity, assimilation, racism, race and science, racial categorization, race and politics, gendered racism, segregation, discrimination, and whiteness.  On-line

 

Course

SOC 253   Pluralism & Identity in Israel

Professor

Yuval Elmelech

CRN

16052

 

Schedule

Tu Th          2:30  -3:50 pm     OLIN 203

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: GISP, Human Rights, Jewish Studies, Middle East Studies

Israel is undergoing major changes in its cultural, religious, and political institutions. These changes coincide with growing ideological and social divisions. Through lectures, academic literature, films, and analysis of news reports, this course examines the sociology of Israeli society and explores some of the key questions of pluralism, identity and social divisions in contemporary Israel. Specifically, we will discuss the questions: how do Israelis define themselves and others as Israelis/Diaspora Jews; Jews/Arabs; secular/religious, new immigrants (Olim hadashim)/veteran Israelis (Vatikim), Ashkenazim/Mizrachim? What are the historical and social origins of these distinctions? What implications do they have for Israel today? The theoretical component of the course presents various approaches for an analysis and understanding of the dynamics of group identity and conflicts. We then explore key questions pertaining to political, demographic, economic, and social forces that shape group identity and social conflict today. Special attention will be given to the media and how it portrays and shapes social and ethnic distinctions.  On-line

 

Course

SOC 310   Cultural Studies: A Sociological Perspective

Professor

Amy Ansell

CRN

16049

 

Schedule

Fr                1:30  -3:50 pm     OLIN 201

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Social Science

Cultural studies is an exciting new interdisciplinary area of study that offers great potential for confronting such important contemporary sociological issues as multiculturalism, nationalism, leisure, media/ideology, and sexuality. Cultural studies meets the sociological perspective in its focus on the link between cultural representations, symbols and practices and the establishment, critique and maintenance of relations of power and inequality. By confronting a wide range of topics – from postcolonialism to youth subcultures, from queer theory to rock-n-roll, from the new racism to the politics of mugging – this course will introduce students to the distinctive theory and method of cultural studies.  On-line

 

Course

SOC 332   Seminar on Social Problems

Professor

Yuval Elmelech

CRN

16050

 

Schedule

Wed            9:30  - 11:50 am  OLIN 301

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Cross listed: Africana Studies, American Studies, Human Rights, Social Policy, SRE

We often read shocking stories about children in poverty, segregated and failing schools, family dissolution, and numerous other problems in contemporary American society.  While these accounts provide a sensational and superficial treatment of various social problems, what do researchers really know about the causes of and solutions for these problems?  This seminar provides a critical survey and analysis of the research on various issues relating to the analysis of social problems in the U.S.  Topics include: schools and education; poverty and welfare policy; crime and violence; teenage pregnancy and abortion; gender inequality; racial segregation and discrimination; ethnicity and immigration; work and socioeconomic attainment.  The course will also provide framework for developing the skill of academic writing, and the appropriate use of theories, research questions and hypotheses.  In particular, the seminar will serve students who are developing their skills for senior projects and other advanced students. On-line