Course

FILM 109   History and Aesthetics of Film

Professor

Jean Ma

CRN

16317

 

Schedule

Mon                     1:30 -4:00 pm      Avery 110

Th (screening)   7:00 - 10:00 pm   Avery 110

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Arts

A one-semester survey course comprising weekly screenings and lectures designed for first-year students, especially those who are considering film as a focus of their undergraduate studies. Films by Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Rossellini, Hitchcock, Deren, and others are studied. Readings of theoretical works by authors including Vertov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Munsterberg, Bazin, and Arnheim. This course is for first-year students only.  On-line

 

Course

FILM 167  Survey of Media Art: Popular Culture and Personal Vision

Professor

Ed Halter

CRN

16477

 

Schedule

Th                        1:30 -4:00 pm      Avery 110

Wed (screening)   7:00 - 10:00 pm  Avery 110

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Arts

An introduction to the history and esthetics of the moving image through an exploration of the ways in which audio-visual technologies have been used to produce both mass-produced entertainment and works of individual expression, with a special focus on how modes of commercial and artistic production have influenced and reacted to one another. Topics include: experimental cinema, home movies, Hollywood and the avant-garde; documentary; television, video art, music video, and early electronic arts; radio, sound art, and Net Art; video games, homebrew games, and game art. This course is open to  first and second-year students only.

 

Course

FILM 202 A    Introduction to the Moving Image II: Video

Professor

Leah Gilliam

CRN

16267

 

Schedule

Tu               10:00 -1:00 pm     AVERY 319

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

A continuation of the study of basic problems (technical and aesthetical) related to the video medium. 

Prerequisite: Film 201  On-line

 

Course

FILM 202 B    Introduction to the Moving Image II: Film

Professor

Peter Hutton

CRN

16324

 

Schedule

Th               1:30 -4:30 pm      AVERY 319

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

A continuation of the study of basic problems (technical and aesthetical) related to the video medium. 

Prerequisite: Film 201 .

 

Course

FILM 202 C    Introduction to the Moving Image II: Video

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

CRN

16327

 

Schedule

Wed            1:30 -4:30 pm      Avery 333

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

A continuation of the study of basic problems (technical and aesthetical) related to the video medium. 

Prerequisite: Film 201  On-line

 

Course

FILM 203   Digital Animation

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

CRN

16328

 

Schedule

Tu               1:30 -4:30 pm      Avery 333

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

Cross-listed: Integrated Arts

In this course we will make video and web-based projects using digital animation and compositing programs (Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects).  The course is designed to help students develop a facility with these tools and to find personal animating styles that surpass the tools at hand. We will work to reveal techniques and aesthetics associated with digital animation that challenge conventions of storytelling, editing, figure/ground relationship, and portrayal of the human form.  To this end, we will refer to diverse examples of animating and collage from film, music, writing, photography, and painting.

Prerequisite: familiarity with a nonlinear video-editing program.

 

Course

FILM 212   Screenwriting I  Workshop

Professor

Marie Regan

CRN

16322

 

Schedule

Tu               1:30 -3:50 pm      AVERY 338

Distribution

OLD: B/F

NEW: Practicing Arts

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society

Screenplays are the foundation of much of our popular culture, but can they be art?  This intensive writing workshop examines the art and practice of the screenplay form, its root in classical narrative structure, how differs from the other written arts and how one can engage its particular tools to express original ideas.  Weekly writing assignments and class critique form the heart of this workshop.  Students should be prepared to share their work with others and participate fully in class discussion.

 

Course

FILM 214   Topics in History of Cinema: Post-war Film in Italy and France

Professor

John Pruitt

CRN

16316

 

Schedule

Wed            1:00 -4:00 pm      Avery 217

Tu (screening)  7:00 - 10:00 pm  Avery 110

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Arts

A lecture survey of two major cinematic schools in post-war Western Europe, both of which had enormous international influence at the time, an influence which arguably can still be felt in contemporary film. We will study four concentrated historical moments of remarkably intense, creative activity: (1) the immediate post-war years in Italy of Neo-realism, dominated by Rossellini, Visconti and De Sica (2) the mid-fifties in France when Tati and Bresson are most impressive as "classicists";(3) the late fifties and early sixties of The French New Wave with the dawn of the directorial careers of Godard, Truffaut, Rivette, Varda, Rohmer, Chabrol et al., and the miraculous maturation of a number of key directors in Italy at roughly the same time, best represented by Fellini, Antonioni, Olmi and Pasolini. Required supplementary readings. Two essay exams and a term paper. Open enrollment. (Note from Prof. Pruitt: Please be advised that this course has been designed to be shorter than normal on reading assignments (mostly primary texts), and longer than normal on class screenings. Thus, you should make sure that Tuesday evenings are set aside for extended double features. The complete syllabus will be posted on my office door (Avery 321).  That being said, I am also going to recommend that two short novels on the required reading list, if possible, be read over January. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to email me.)  On-line

 

Course

FILM / IA 301   Major Conference: Found Footage, Appropriation and Hacks

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

CRN

16326

 

Schedule

Wed            10:00 - 12:50 pm  Avery 217

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

Cross-listed: Integrated Arts

This course surveys the history of appropriation in experimental media from the found footage, cut-up and collage films of the 1950's, the Lettrists and Situationists up to the current artistic and activist production efforts such as culture jamming, game hacking, sampling, hoaxing, resistance, interference and tactical media intervention.  The spectrum of traditions which involve the strategic  recontextualizing of educational, industry and/or broadcast media sources, projects that detourn official 'given' meaning, re-editing of outtakes, recycling of detritus, and a variety of works of piracy and parody which skew/subvert media codes will be examined for their contribution to the field.  Issues regarding gender, identity, media and net politics, technology, copyright and aesthetics will be addressed as raised by the work.  Students are required to write a research paper and produce their own tape or video game intervention, as the syllabus for the class will specify. On-line

 

Course

FILM 312   Advanced Screenwriting

Professor

Marie Regan

CRN

16323

 

Schedule

Wed            9:30 - 11:50 am   AVERY 338

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

In this intensive writing workshop, we will take the skills learned in Screenwriting and use them to create a long form screenplay.  We begin the workshop with screenplay analysis then move on to develop a script from outline through execution.  Weekly writing assignments and class critique are at the core of this workshop although issues in adaptation, practicalities imposed by production and the role of screenwriting in the marketplace will also be discussed.  The goal of the course is the completion of a long form script that reflects skillful use of the tools of screenwriting to express a complex original idea.  Interested students should contact  Prof. Regan by December 1st; enrollment by permission of the instructor.

 

Course

FILM 317   Film Production Workshop

Professor

Peter Hutton

CRN

16325

 

Schedule

Fr                1:30 -4:30 pm      AVERY 319

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

A junior level production workshop designed to give students working in film a more thorough understanding of a wide range of cinematic vocabularies and aesthetics that are unique to the language of film. Students will be required to finish short films that will explore the qualities of film through extensive in class exploration of film stocks, lighting techniques and cinemagraphic strategies. The class will visit a New York motion picture lab to better understand the photo/chemical implications of film in the age of digital imaging.

 

Course

FILM 332   Advanced Digital  Editing and Sound Design

Professor

Leah Gilliam

CRN

16268

 

Schedule

Th               1:30 -4:30 pm      AVERY 333

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

This course investigates editing design and theory in order to refine students’ nonlinear editing techniques. Students are guided through all phases of postproduction, including production scheduling and management, principal photography, assembly edits, effects generation, soundtrack construction, sound design, presentation formats and distribution. The course consists of technical instruction, readings, in-class screenings, analysis of past and present editing strategies and critiques of student projects. Interested students should have some experience with Final Cut Pro (or a similar nonlinear editing application) and come to class with projects that are nearing or in production. Contact gilliam@bard.edu for more information. On-line

 

Course

FILM 346   Surrealism and Cinema

Professor

Jean Ma

CRN

16321

 

Schedule

Tu               4:00 -6:20 pm         Avery 117

Sun (screening)  7:00 - 10:00 pm   Avery 110

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Arts

This course traces the connections between surrealism and film culture, ranging from early twentieth century European experimental films, to the narrative features of Luis Buñuel, to French horror, to Cinema Novo, to 1960s and 70s Japanese avant-garde cinema.  Through this spectrum of case studies, we will consider surrealism not as a self-contained movement, but as a tendency and a representational politics persisting across different historical and geographical contexts.  The course frames the critical project of surrealism as both an aesthetic discourse and a theoretical endeavor extending across the fields of art history, cinema studies, psychoanalysis, materialist philosophy, sociology, and anthropology.  Readings include Georges Bataille, Michel Leiris, André Breton, Hal Foster, Rosalind Krauss, Linda Williams, and Fatimah Rony.This course is open to upper college and qualified students with the instructor’s permission.  On-line

 

Course

FILM 405   Senior Seminar

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

CRN

16437

 

Schedule

Wed            6:00 -8:00 pm      Avery 217

Distribution

OLD: n/a

NEW: n/a

0 credit  As a newly established component of the Film Program's requirements for all majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills  and resources among the seniors working on Senior Project.  The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress.  The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film.