Course

ECON 101 A    Introduction to Microeconomics

Professor

Sanjaya DeSilva

CRN

16083

 

Schedule

Wed Fr       1:30  -2:50 pm     OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A/E/Q

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: Environmental Studies

This course covers the essential ideas of economic analysis.  Students will learn how economists explain human behavior as we seek to satisfy our needs and wants.  The first part of the course develops models of consumer and firm behavior, including demand and supply, in the context of an idealized competitive market.  From there we analyze several ways in which the real world deviates from this model, including monopoly and other forms of imperfect competition, information problems, minimum wages and other price controls, taxes, and government regulation.  Along the way we will explore public policy problems such as pricing the environment, winners and losers from international trade, health care costs and insurance, and the high price of textbooks. Econ 101 and 102 may be taken in either order.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 101E   Experimental Microeconomics

Professor

Tsu-Yu Tsao

CRN

16084

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   3:00  -4:20 pm     OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A/E/Q

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  Environmental StudiesTraditionally, economics has been regarded as a non-experimental science, where researchers have to rely on direct observations of the real world to verify their theories.  That view, however, has changed in the last twenty years as many researchers begin to test economic theories in laboratory settings.  In this course, we will follow this relatively new methodology in economics and use in-class experiments to study economic concepts.  Each week, we devote one classmeeting to conducting an experiment and the other to understand the underlying principles of the experiment and how those principles can be applied to analyze real-world issues.  Topics to be addressed include minimum wage law, legality ofdrug use, farm subsidies in the U.S., the protection of intellectual property and pricing of AIDS drugs in developing countries, tradeoffs between efficiency and equity associated with taxation, the use of pollution permits in combating environmental degradation, international trade, and labor market discrimination.  This course can be used to fulfill the requirement of Econ 101: Introduction to Microeconomics for students who intend to moderate into economics.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 102 A  Introduction to Macroeconomics

Professor

Andrew Pearlman

CRN

16085

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   12:00  -1:20 pm    OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A/E/Q

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP

This course begins with the examination of the aggregate behavior of modern economies: the factors leading to economic growth, explanations of booms and recessions, unemployment, interest rates, inflation, budget deficits or surpluses, and international trade.  We will also analyze the government’s ability (or inability) to use monetary and fiscal policies to achieve economic goals such as full employment and price stability. Throughout the course, we will debate whether government should use monetary and fiscal policy tools to try to “fine tune” the economy and what the likely effects of such government involvement are. We will analyze these issues using current domestic and international examples. Econ 101 and 102 may be taken in either order.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 102 B  Introduction to Macroeconomics

Professor

Tamar Khitarishvili

CRN

16086

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   10:30  - 11:50 am OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A/E/Q

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP

This course begins with the examination of the aggregate behavior of modern economies: the factors leading to economic growth, explanations of booms and recessions, unemployment, interest rates, inflation, budget deficits or surpluses, and international trade.  We will also analyze the government’s ability (or inability) to use monetary and fiscal policies to achieve economic goals such as full employment and price stability. Throughout the course, we will debate whether government should use monetary and fiscal policy tools to try to “fine tune” the economy and what the likely effects of such government involvement are. We will analyze these issues using current domestic and international examples. Econ 101 and 102 may be taken in either order.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 115   Economic  Dimensions of Global  Issues

Professor

Sanjaya DeSilva

CRN

16171

 

Schedule

Wed Fr       10:30  - 11:50 am ALBEE 106

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP, Human Rights, Science, Technology & Society, Social Policy

This introductory course uses simple economic concepts to examine global and international issues of current and enduring interest. (Public issues in the U.S. are addressed in the fall semester companion course ECON 110). The aim of this course is to help students with little or no economics background to understand the economic dimensions of important social and political issues of the world. Topics will be drawn from a pool that includes the WTO and trade liberalization; European integration; regionalism (NAFTA, FTAA etc.); global warming, deforestation and other environmental issues; the role of multinational corporations and multilateral agencies such as the World Bank and IMF; the AIDS crisis in Africa; poverty and hunger; inequality within and between nations; the debt and currency crises of Latin America and East Asia; the recent economic stagnation of Japan; the transition from planning to markets in Eastern Europe and former Soviet Republics. The discussion of each topic will begin with a general review using materials from the popular media. This will be followed by a more detailed economic analysis using micro and macro economic concepts. Relevant theoretical models and principles will be introduced during the discussion. In addition to short essays, class presentations and team projects, students will be asked to maintain a weekly journal of relevant current events that are covered in the international media.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 202   Intermediate Macroeconomics

Professor

Dimitri Papadimitriou

CRN

16087

 

Schedule

Tu Th          10:30  - 11:50 am ALBEE 106

Distribution

OLD: A/E

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP, Social Policy

This course is the continuation of the introductory macroeconomics course. In it, students will get acquainted with main models that macroeconomists use to analyze the way economies behave. The course starts by looking at the models that explain long run economic growth. We then focus our attention on investigating economic theories that explain short run business cycles, the periods of recessions and booms that occur on a regular basis. An important part of the course is to investigate the role of governments in affecting the long run and short run economic prospects of their countries. We apply the acquired theoretical knowledge to a range of current economic issues, including budget deficits and national debt, international trade, and the role of institutions.  Prerequisite: Econ 102 (Introduction to Macroeconomics)  On-line

 

Course

ECON 205   Introduction to Mathematical Economics

Professor

Kris Feder

CRN

16088

 

Schedule

Wed Fr       12:00  -1:20 pm    ALBEE 106

Distribution

OLD: E/Q

NEW: MATC

Introduction to the use of elementary calculus and linear algebra in economic theory. This course provides the basic mathematical skills necessary to approach the professional economics literature. Emphasis is on formulating economic problems and building economic models in mathematical language. Applications are based upon simple micro- and macroeconomic models. Prerequisites:  ECON  101 or 102; calculus.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 210   History of Economic Thought I

Professor

Kris Feder

CRN

16089

 

Schedule

Wed Fr       9:00  - 10:20 am  OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP, Science, Technology & Society

The early history of the yet-young science of economics: Petty, Locke, Hume, and the age of mercantilism; the Physiocrats of 18th century France, inventors of the first circular-flow analysis of the macroeconomy; the revolutionary work of philosopher Adam Smith in 1776; and the century of classical political economy that followed him in the English-speaking world: Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, John Stuart Mill, and others who studied the virtues and vices of the market system and debated the great questions of the relations of land, labor and capital. At its maturity, the classical school gave rise to two very different attacks on existing politico-economic institutions:  in continental Europe, the socialist critique of Karl Marx; and in the United States and England, the Lockean critique of Henry George. This course focuses on the classical period to the late 19th century, when classical political economy gave way to the "marginal revolution," which, applying the mathematical insights of calculus to economic questions, focused more on subjective choice and perhaps less on political issues and institutions.   Prerequisite: One economics course.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 229   Statistics

Professor

Andrew Pearlman

CRN

16091

 

Schedule

Tu Th          9:00  - 10:20 am  OLIN 204

Distribution

OLD: A/E/Q

NEW: MATC

Cross-listed: Environmental Studies, GISP

The first of a two-course series designed to examine empirical economics, and a prerequisite for Economics 329, Econometrics. Basic concepts of statistics, probability, probability distributions, random variables, correlation, and simple regression are introduced; the techniques of statistical inference hypothesis testing are developed. Numerous examples and computer-based exercises are included. Prerequisite: Economics 101 or 102.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 237   Economics of the Public Sector

Professor

Andrew Pearlman

CRN

16095

 

Schedule

Tu Th          1:00  -2:20 pm     ALBEE 106

Distribution

OLD: A/E

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: American Studies, Environmental Studies, Social Policy

This course introduces the two branches of traditional public finance, corresponding to the two sides of the government budget—revenue and spending. On the spending side, we survey the economic rationales for the existence of government and for its intervention in the economy, as well as the economic consequences of government expenditures. On the revenue side, we examine the problem of efficient pricing of public sector output; the consequences of alternative tax structures for the distribution of wealth and the efficiency of resource allocation; and contemporary debates about tax reform. This course also introduces alternative approaches to the economics of collective action. The theory of public choice explains the actions of clubs, governments, interest groups, corporations, labor unions, and other associations with reference to the interacting choices of self-interested individuals. Topics in public choice theory include the economic theory of clubs; the theory of constitutions; property rights; efficiency, equity and consistency of alternative voting rules; and economic models of the behavior of legislators, politicians, bureaucrats, and citizens. Prerequisite: Introduction to Microeconomics  On-line

 

Course

ECON 301   Topics in Microeconomics

Professor

Tsu-Yu Tsao

CRN

16092

 

Schedule

Tu Th          2:30  -3:50 pm     OLIN 201

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

An analysis of theories of price determination and allocation of resources by the market; factor prices, income distribution, and poverty; effects of monopoly and imperfect competition; problems of the consumer society, public goods, and social welfare.  On-line

 

Course

ECON 323   Topics in  International Trade and Finance

Professor

Sanjaya DeSilva

CRN

16093

 

Schedule

Tu Th          4:00  -5:20 pm     ALBEE 106

Distribution

OLD: A/E

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP, Social Policy

An examination of advanced topics in international economics using theory and empirical evidence. Recent theoretical advances in understanding trade under imperfect competition, strategic trade, political economy of trade policy and international policy coordination are discussed. Classical, neoclassical and modern theories are used to analyze important policy issues such as the effect of trade on economic growth and income distribution, international movements of labor and capital, trade between unequal partners, crises in emerging markets, preferential trade agreements and imbalances in agricultural trade.  Prerequisites: Introduction to Microeconomics & Introduction to Macroeconomics  On-line

 

Course

ECON 325   Topics in Economic Growth and Development

Professor

Tamar Khitarishvili

CRN

16094

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   3:00  -4:20 pm     OLIN 310

Distribution

OLD: A/E

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: GISP

This course introduces students to the theoretical modeling of determinants of economic growth and development. It presents a synthesis of recent and older literature on economic growth, income and asset inequality, poverty and undernutrition, population growth, international trade, and the markets for land, labor and credit. The analyzed models will be supplemented with empirical evidence from around the world. Prerequisites:  ECON 201 or permission of the instructor.  On-line

 

Course

ECON CONF   Senior Conference

Professor

Faculty

CRN

16096

 

Schedule

Tu               5:30  -6:50 pm     ALBEE 106

Distribution

OLD: n/a

NEW:

Students writing Senior Projects in Economics will be required to attend the Senior Conference, which will meet not more than one evening every two weeks throughout the fall and spring terms. Not for credit.  On-line