Courses listed as CLASSICS (CLAS) are entirely in English and require no knowledge of an ancient language. Greek and Latin involve the study of the language itself.

 

Course

CLAS / LIT 219†† Ancient Lyric: Translations and Imitations

Professor

William Mullen

CRN

16063

 

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††† 1:00-2:20 pm†††† OLIN 203

Distribution

OLD: D

NEW: Foreign Language, Literature, & Culture

A course in English in which the great lyric poetry of Sappho, Pindar, Catullus and Horace will be studied through the many centuries of translations and imitations of them by British and American writers.We will look at metrical and linguistic maps of the original, range widely in comparing translations of a few key poems, and study the many kinds of imitation they generated.Students with foreign languages, not only Greek and Latin but also Italian, French, Spanish, German, Russian or any of the others into which these poets have been translated, will be encouraged to bring their knowledge to bear.On-line

 

Course

CLAS 250†† Rhetoric and Public Speaking

Professor

William Mullen

CRN

16064

 

Schedule

Mon Wed†† 1:30-2:50 pm†††† OLIN 201

Wed††††††††††† 10:00- 11:20 am HDR 302

Distribution

OLD: A/F

NEW: Practicing Arts

A course in the theory and practice of public speaking, with equal emphasis on both aspects and with one meeting per week devoted to each. As practice the course will ask students to give speeches in various genres, from presentation of information before small groups, to formal addresses recommending courses of action to deliberative assemblies. Videos of the speeches given will be used in the process of critiquing them. As theory the course will study the texts of actual orations and of theoretical treatises on the nature of rhetoric, by Greek, Roman, English, and American authors and orators such as Demosthenes, Aristotle, Cicero, Churchill,Martin Luther King. The emphasis will be on rhetoric as embodied not in written documents but in the spoken word itself. Some time will be spent with tapes and videos of important speeches of the last century.This year we will be dividing the class into two sections, one of which will constitute a Virtual Campus Course meeting by videoconference with a roughly equal number of students at Smolny College in St. Petersburg, Russia.While both sections of Bard students only will meet all together on Mondays,the Virtual Campus sectionís second meeting, the one by videoconference with Russian students,will be Wed 10-11:20, in order to accommodate the eight hour time difference.In the course of giving speeches for each other and critiquing them, Smolny and Bard students in this section will also use the occasion to study Russian speeches and reflect on differences in the public speaking traditions of Russia and of the Anglophone world.†† Students may express a preference as to whether they wish to be in the regular or the Virtual Campus section; I will be making a final choice which limits the latter to eight students. Open for online pre-registration.On-line

 

Course

HIST / CLAS 300†† Major Conference:Creating History

Professor

Carolyn Dewald

CRN

16032

 

Schedule

Mon††††††††††† 1:30-3:50 pm†††† OLIN 306

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

Cross-listed:History

The word history comes from the first sentence of the Histories of Herodotus, the Greek father of history, writing in the fifth century B.C.E.This course looks closely at how history as a field of inquiry came about and the way that the early Greek historians, Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon, shaped its identity.We will consider how the first historians thought about such things as data (when is it trustworthy?), narrative structure (does it inevitably distort data?), depiction of character (what role does the individual play in shaping events?), and the usefulness of the discipline that the early historians invented (do they tell a true story?).Some theoretical readings, both traditional and poststructuralist, will be used to help us begin to answer these questions.About halfway through the semester, students will be encouraged to pick a historian not in the original triad (either ancient -- Polybius, Tacitus, Livy are possible choices -- or more recent, writing in a period germane to the student's senior project interests) to study in detail, using the same criteria that we have used to consider Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon.Two papers will be required; all required reading will be in English.On-line††

 

Course

ARTH 227†† Roman Urbanism from Romulus to Rutelli (753 BCE-2000CE)

Professor

Diana Minsky

CRN

16385

 

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††† 4:00 -5:20 pm††††† Fisher Annex

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Arts

See Art History section for description.