Course

BIO 123 Sex and Gender

Professor

Felicia Keesing

CRN

15073

 

Schedule

Tu Th 11:30 - 12:50 pm HEG 102

Tu 1:30 - 4:00 pm ROSE 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

Why are there so many differences in the social behaviors of men and women? Why are there two sexes? Why do women get depressed more often than men but commit suicide less often? Why are women, on average, shorter than men? Why do they live longer? Students in this course, intended for nonscientists, examine the biological bases of sex and gender. They consider evidence for hypotheses that attempt to explain differences in behavior between males and females, including data from behavioral studies on both humans and other animals. The genetic and hormonal determinants of sex and gender are investigated, and the arguments for how and why sex evolved in the first place are considered, especially in light of the strong evolutionary advantages of self-cloning. No specific science or mathematics background beyond algebra is required.

 

Course

BIO 130 Field Study in Natural History

Professor

William Maple

CRN

15346

 

Schedule

Tu Fr 1:30 5:00 pm HEG 308

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW: Laboratory Science

Designed to acquaint the interested nonscience student with the plants and animals that make the Bard campus their home, including trees and shrubs in their winter condition and wildflowers in the spring. Animal tracks and bird migrations also are objects of study. Although the course includes some lab work on preserved specimens, especially during severe weather, most class meetings are field trips. Participants must have clothing appropriate to the weather and terrain: good walking shoes or boots, warm clothing and rain gear. Some Saturday field trips and early morning meetings may be required. Limited to 10 students.

 

Course

BIO 142 Organismal Biology

Professor

William Maple

CRN

15075

 

Schedule

Wed Fr 10:30 - 12:30 pm HEG 102

 

Lab schedule (students attend one)

A; Th 1:30 - 4:00 pm ROSE 305

B: Th 4:30 - 7:00 pm ROSE 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Laboratory Science

An introduction to organismal biology and ecology, primarily for those who intend to continue in biology; also open to interested students not majoring in science. Topics include population genetics, evolution, vertebrate embryology and anatomy, and animal phylogeny, taxonomy, and ecology. Biology 142 may be taken before Biology 141, if necessary. Students majoring in biology are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 142 concurrently. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses.

 

Course

BIO 144 Biostatistics

Professor

Robert Cutler

CRN

15305

 

Schedule

Wed 10:00 - 12:00 pm ROSE 108

Fr 10:00 12:00 pm HEG 106

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Math & Computing

This course provides a background in (1) the basic methods of data analysis for biologists, (2) applications of mathematics to the description of biological phenomena, and (3) the generation of testable hypotheses from models of biological processes. The goal of this course is to give students a general idea of what statistical methods are commonly used in biology, which methods are appropriate for which types of data, and to provide an in-depth examination of how the methods work. Among topics covered are elementary probability and statistics, fitting and hypothesis testing, characteristics of frequency distributions, regression analysis, and some multivariate based methods. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses.

 

Course

BIO 202 Evolution

Professor

Robert Cutler

CRN

15347

 

Schedule

Wed Fr 1:30 - 3:30 pm HEG 201

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

Examines the following areas of evolution: population and quantitative genetics, natural and sexual selection, adaptation, speciation, and the major themes in phylogenetic evolution. Basic theory as well as empirical evidence for evolutionary processes that occur in both natural and computer-modeled populations are explored. Prerequisite: Biology 201 or permission of the instructor.

 

Course

BIO 304 Cell Biology

Professor

Michael Tibbetts

CRN

15350

 

Schedule

Wed Fr 1:30 - 2:50 pm PRE 128

Fr 3:00 - 4:50 pm ROSE 305

Distribution

OLD: E /G

NEW: Laboratory Science

This course examines the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in processes relating to eukaryotic cellular organization, communication, movement, reproduction, and death. These topics are considered through close reading of the primary and secondary literatures. Discussions of review articles on particular topics precede in-depth discussions of one or more research articles in those areas. The literature is read with the objective of understanding the current models describing cellular processes, as well as the experimental rationale and the modern techniques used to probe fundamental cellular mechanisms and test the models. The laboratory consists of a semester-long project in which a cellular process is investigated. Offered in alternate spring semesters.

Prerequisites: Biology 201-202, and Chemistry 201-202.

 

Course

BIO 308 / 408 Seminar in Biological Research

Professor

Michael Tibbetts

CRN

15249 / 15250

 

Schedule

Tu 7:30 - 9:30 pm Albee 102

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW: N/A

2 credits Juniors and seniors concentrating in biology are strongly urged to take this two-credit course. Each senior presents personal research in progress or significant material from the current literature. Each junior presents an interesting paper of personal choice from the literature. The purpose of the seminar is to enhance communication among seniors about their research and to encourage juniors to become familiar with both the biological literature and research undertaken in the program. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

 

Course

BIO 314 Evolution and Diversity of Mammals

Professor

Justine Salton

CRN

15247

 

Schedule

M W 4:00 - 6:00 pm HEG 300

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

What were the ecological, biogeographical, and morphological circumstances leading to the evolution of Mammalia over 200 million years ago? What led to the Cenozoic explosion of diversity, and what are the primary structural innovations that characterize extant mammalian orders? This course introduces students to the evolution and diversity of the three major mammalian lineages, the monotremes, marsupials and placentals. Class discussions will consider mammalian phylogeny and taxonomy, structural adaptive innovation, biogeography, community ecology, behavioral strategy, and life history. Students will become very familiar with the cranial and postcranial skeleton and will learn to identify the major mammalian taxa as well as local species. In addition, we will practice several field techniques and those interested will learn to prepare specimens for museum collections.

Prerequisite: At least one 200-level course in biology, or permission of the instructor. Not open to first-year students.

 

Course

BIO 333 Ecology of African Savannas II

Professor

Felicia Keesing

CRN

15248

 

Schedule

Fr 10:00 - 12:00 pm HEG 300

Additional project meetings.

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW: Laboratory Science

A two-semester scientific investigation of the ecology of African savannas. Students collect data during an intersession trip to Kenya, analyze the data graphically and statistically, and prepare and deliver oral and written presentations of the results of their research projects. Classes before and after intersession cover basic statistics for data analysis, evaluation and interpretation of scientific data, and preparation of both written and oral scientific presentations. Students are selected for this course through an application process at the start of each academic year. Biology 323 and 333 are nondivisible.