CRN

14060

Distribution

E/G

Course No.

NSCI 102

Title

Biology of Infectious Disease

Professor

John Ferguson

Schedule

Tu Th†† 3:00 pm -4:50 pmHEGEMAN 102

Lab:Wed††††† 1:30 pm -4:00 pm†††††† ROSE 305

This course, intended for the nonscience major, investigates several human infectious diseases in detail, using actual case studies where possible. Bacterial, viral, fungal, protozoan, and metazoan disease agents will be covered. Students are expected to read each case before class and be prepared to discuss the manifestations, detection, diagnosis, and treatment of the case. Most case studies come from the nontechnical literature and serve as paradigms of scientific methodology as applied to the diagnosis and rational treatment of human disease. Amplification of the physiological bases of disease is provided through lectures and additional reading.

 

CRN

14061

Distribution

E/G

Course No.

NSCI 181 A††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Q course

Title

Light and Color

Professor

Burton Brody

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††††† 10:30 am - 12:30 pm†††† ROSE 108

An introduction to light, optical phenomena, and related devices, including some historical perspective; classical and modern models of light; light and color in nature, and vision; the geometrical optics of lenses, mirrors, and related devices; the physical optics of interference and diffraction; spectroscopy and polarization; lasers, and holography. Without assuming either prior knowledge of physics or heavier mathematics, we will develop models and explore them in intermixed lecture/discussion and experiment/demonstration modes.

 

CRN

14322

Distribution

E/G

Course No.

NSCI 181 B††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Q course

Title

Light and Color

Professor

Burton Brody

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††††† 1:30 pm -3:30 pm†††††† ROSE 108

An introduction to light, optical phenomena, and related devices, including some historical perspective; classical and modern models of light; light and color in nature, and vision; the geometrical optics of lenses, mirrors, and related devices; the physical optics of interference and diffraction; spectroscopy and polarization; lasers, and holography. Without assuming either prior knowledge of physics or heavier mathematics, we will develop models and explore them in intermixed lecture/discussion and experiment/demonstration modes.

 

CRN

14324

Distribution

E/G

Course No.

NSCI 192††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Q course

Title

Simulating Reality

Professor

Sven Anderson

Schedule

Mon Fr††††††††† 10:00 am - 12:00 pm†††† HDR 101A

This introduction to modeling and simulation is intended for students who are interested in how computer software can be used to build virtual models of objects, processes, and complex systems.Students will create and run several different simulation model types drawn from a variety of disciplines, including: artificial life, bioacoustics, cognitive science, economics, environmental science, evolution, musical acoustics, neuroscience, operations science, physics, political science, population dynamics, and speech science.Students will gain a practical understanding of modeling, simulation, and analysis as they use a variety of software that enables them to build simulation models that answer a practical need and/or scientific question.No prior knowledge of computer programming is required.Prerequisite: strong background in precalculus mathematics or its equivalent.

 

CRN

14323

Distribution

C/E

Course No.

NSCI 225

Title

Einstein

Professor

Peter Skiff

Schedule

Tu Th†† 1:30 pm -2:50 pmHEGEMAN 102

Cross-listed: History and Philosophy of Science

An examination of Einsteinís life and work, the impact of his work on current world views, and some of the many controversies involved therein, using biography and popular descriptions of the relativity theories, atomic theories, and optical theories. We will compare the advantages of methods of positivism and realism in philosophy and of "internalism" and "externalism" in the history of science. Readings include some primary sources; secondary authors include Overbye, F`lsing and Holton. Accessible to students with no prior college‑level scientific or mathematical experience.