CRN

14144

Distribution

B/C

Course No.

LIT / CLAS 204A

Title

Comparative Literature A:  Ancient Literature from Gilgamesh to Socrates

Professor

James Romm

Schedule

Tu Th            11:30 am - 12:50 pm     ASP 302

Cross-listed:  Literature

This course will follow the evolution of the literature of the ancient  world, from its beginnings in Assyria, Egypt and Babylon to its great  flowering in classical Greece. Our focus will be on the figure of the hero, a being who is not quite either mortal or divine, and the tragic relationship of this figure to the gods and to human society.  The problem of the hero lies at the heart of the great epics and tragic dramas produced by the ancient world, including the Epic of Gilgamesh, several books of the Bible, Homer's Iliad, Aeschylus' Oresteia, and the Oedipus plays of Sophocles.  We will consider all these works and others, and will end with the philosophic hero created by Plato in the person of Socrates.

 

CRN

14168

Distribution

A

Course No.

CLAS / ARTH 213

Title

The Classical Tradition in Western Architecture

Professor

Diana Minsky

Schedule

Mon Wed       5:30 pm -  6:50 pm       OLIN 102

Cross-listed: Classical Studies

This lecture-based class traces classicism, one of the dominant strains of Western design, in public architecture from its beginnings in ancient Greece to its presence in contemporary America in order to understand its evolving political iconography (both democratic and dictatorial).  After defining the formal vocabulary, major monuments, and symbolic associations of its Greek and Roman roots, the central section of the class will focus on the Italian Renaissance's revival and reinvention of the classical vocabulary through the birth of archaeology, the writing of architectural treatises, and the adaptation of classical types to Christian functions.  Next, the class explores the impact of Enlightenment interpretations, the discovery of Pompeii, and the opening up of Greece on classical revival monuments.  The final weeks study the role of classical architecture in America from Thomas Jefferson to Post-Modernism.

Requirements include tests, a series of short critical essays, and a field trip to New York City.  Open to all students.

 

CRN

14160

Distribution

B/D

Course No.

CLAS / LIT 216

Title

Ancient Law and Human Rights

Professor

Alan Zeitlin

Schedule

Mon Wed       3:00 pm -  4:20 pm       OLIN 203

Cross-listed:  Human Rights

The course will focus on nascent concepts of human rights in several ancient cultures:  Greece, Rome, Israel, and China.  Though none of these cultures had a formal law or doctrine of human rights, it is nevertheless worthwhile asking to what extent fundamental modern notions (such as the right of the individual to speak freely and not to be subjected to torture, rape, or collective punishment) exist in the jurisprudence, customs, philosophy and literature (including historiography) of these cultures.  Such an inquiry will illuminate not only the roots of some of our modern ideas about human rights, but also the nature of many of the barriers that remain to implementing them.

 

CRN

14152

Distribution

B/C

Course No.

CLAS / HIST 2191

Title

Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World

Professor

Carolyn DeWald

Schedule

Tu Th            4:30 pm -  5:50 pm       ASP 302

Cross-listed: Classical Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies

An investigation of the gendered relations of men and women from archaic Greece (c. 800 BCE) to the Roman Empire in the third century CE.  Using literary, historical, legal, and archaeological sources, the course provides both an introduction to the social history of ancient sexuality, and an interpretation of some of the most compelling literary presentations of it from Greek and Roman antiquity.  Primary sources will explore both the institutional and ideological structures by which people live and interact, and the affective meanings of those structures.  Topics include: early Greek sources; women's lives in classical Athens; Greek homo-erotic relationships; sexuality as part of Greek drama, religion and mythology; women in Roman myth, literature, and history; differences in Greek and Roman sexual/social bonds.

 

CRN

14070

Distribution

A/F

Course No.

CLAS 250

Title

Rhetoric and Public Speaking

Professor

William Mullen

Schedule

Mon Wed       1:00 pm -  3:00 pm       LC 206

A course in the theory and practice of public speaking, with equal emphasis on both aspects and with one meeting per week devoted to each. As practice the course will ask students to give speeches in various genres, from presentation of information before small groups, to formal addresses recommending courses of action to deliberative assemblies. Videos of the speeches given will be used in the process of critiquing them. As theory the course will study the texts of actual orations and of theoretical treatises on the nature of rhetoric, by Greek, Roman, English and American authors and orators such as Demosthenes, Aristotle, Cicero, Churchill, and Martin Luther King. The emphasis will be on rhetoric as embodied not in written documents but in the spoken word itself. Some time will be spent with tapes and videos of important speeches of the last century.  Enrollment will be limited to nine students in order to give enough time for each student to practice speaking each week.

 

CRN

14071

Distribution

B/D

Course No.

CLAS / LIT 275

Title

Poetry and Athletics

Professor

William Mullen

Schedule

Tu Th            3:00 pm -  4:20 pm       OLIN 201

The meanings to be seen in athletics have stirred the meditations and praises of poets in many different cultures and genres.  This course will study the strange intersections of the physical, the social and the sacred we still recognize in sports.  We will allot equal time to three different sets of readings: 1) victory odes for the ancient Greek games, principally those of Pindar, often considered the greatest lyric poet of the West, concerned with boxing, wrestling, running, pentathlon, pancratium, chariot, and dithyramb; 2) case studies of the wedding of poetry to athletics in other cultures on the other side of the world, as in songs for the Hawaiian royal surfing festivals,  tales of the foundational ball game in the Mayan "Popol Vuh", and chants to accompany African-Brazilian capoeira;   3) an anthology of sports poetry in 19th and 20th century Europe and America, concerned with jousting,  running, bullfighting, football, basketball, and baseball.   We will also follow planning for the  Athens 2004 Olympic Games and its ancillary cultural events.  In all three parts we will read not only the poems themselves but also some scholarship by sports historians on the particular athletic events they reflect.  All readings will be in English, and no prerequisites are necessary.