CRN

15254

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 104

Title

International Relations

Professor

Sanjib Baruah

Schedule

Wed Fr 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 202
The course introduces basic concepts and selected problems in international relations. How order is maintained in world politics is the central theme. The role of the balance of power, alliance systems, international organizations, and international law in maintaining order is examined. Has a "new world order" been taking shape since the end of the Cold War? The course studies study of a number of current issues, such as global trade and the global environment, nuclear nonproliferation, terrorism, civil wars, and failed states and explores what international cooperation or non-cooperation in these areas means for world order.


CRN

15260

Distribution

A/C

Course No.

PS 118

Title

Theories of the Self

Professor

Elaine Thomas

Schedule

Tu Th 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm PRE 101
This course examines the psychological, social, and intellectual origins of the "self" and compares different theoretical and practical approaches to transforming it. The course will begin by retracing the early development of Freud's psychological theory of the self and his invention of a new "psychoanalytic" approach to treatment and self-understanding. Freud's theory of the self will then be critically compared to the ideas of other contemporary authors representing a range of alternative cultural and intellectual viewpoints. The course will be particularly concerned with whether theories of the self can be applied cross-culturally, and with how understandings of self-identity and practices of self-transformation in different contexts reflect, challenge, or reinforce socially established patterns of sexual, racial, and economic inequality.


CRN

15253

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 182

Title

Contested Ideals in American Political Thought

Professor

Joseph Luders

Schedule

Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 203

Cross-listed: American Studies, Gender Studies, Historical Studies Related interest: AADS, MES

Liberty, democracy, equality. These fundamental values have been invoked, disputed, and transformed from the colonial period to the present. The contestation over the meaning of these values is not simply of historical interest. The cultural vocabulary of the past defines and shapes the current political controversies and it is only by understanding the historical development of American political thought that we can begin to comprehend the origins and dynamics of current political debates. The course examines the construction of American political ideals and how they have been changed and broadened in particular by those who have been excluded from full citizenship rights. Racial and gender exclusions will be addressed by examining explicit critiques and demands for inclusion as well as by critically surveying the canonical texts in American political thought. The course concludes with an analysis of the contours of contemporary political discourse as manifested in debates over selected political issues. Course readings include selections from John Winthrop, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, John Dewey, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Frances Willard, Emma Goldman, Betty Friedan, Phyllis Schlafly, W.E.B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Cornel West, and others.


CRN

15252

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 210

Title

Gender and Public Policy

Professor

Joseph Luders

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:00 am - 11:20 am OLIN 201

Cross-listed: American Studies, Gender Studies, History

From voting to abortion rights, the American state has fundamentally shaped the social, economic, and political possibilities for women. Consequently, since the founding of the American republic to the present, women have contested the boundaries of their exclusion, pushed for the greater equality, and argued for full citizenship rights. This course begins with a consideration of the competing theories of the American policymaking process. Next, the more specific dynamics of gendered policies will be addressed with attention paid to the issue framing, shifting partisan affiliations, labor force participation, and the difficulties of referring to gender as a homogeneous category. The latter half of the course surveys a range of topics such as coverture, women's suffrage, the Equal Rights Amendment, abortion rights, welfare reform, anti-discrimination laws, and laws concerning violence against women. The course concludes with an analysis of contemporary currents regarding gender politics and policy.


CRN

15256

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 214

Title

U.S. - Latin American Relations

Professor

Omar Encarnacion

Schedule

Mon Wed 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 204

Cross Listed: American Studies, LAIS

A comprehensive overview of the relationships between the United States and the nations of Latin America, how this process was affected by historical and ideological events, and what possibilities exist for its future. The course is divided into three sections: first, historical overview of the events that shaped US-Latin American relations, emphasizing US military interventions in Latin America, US attempts to establish political and economic hegemony, and US efforts to export democratic government; second, an examination of the principal issues that currently dominate the relations between the US and its southern neighbors: economic integration, trade, drugs, and immigration; third, a close look at the relationships between the United States and three countries of special interest to it and its domestic politics: Cuba, Mexico and Puerto Rico. Open to all students.


CRN

15263

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 228

Title

Central / Eastern European Politics

Professor

Jonathan Becker

Schedule

Tu Th 4:30 pm - 5:50 pm OLIN 201

Cross-listed: Russian and Eurasian Studies

This course examines the political, social and economic changes that have taken place in Central and Eastern (including Russia) from 1985 to the present. Topics include the development of political institutions, economic reforms and social changes, including issues of identity and nationalism The course uses comparative analysis to identify similarities and differences in the transitional period. Countries examined will include Russia, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania, Hungary, Belarus, Ukraine, Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia.


CRN

15250

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 295

Title

Dreams of Perfectibility, Part II: The Quest for Hegemony from FDR to Clinton

Professor

James Chace

Schedule

Mon Tu 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 101

Cross-listed: American Studies

Immediately after the Second World War, a clash of ideologies developed into a Cold War between the two victors, the United States and Soviet Russia. To what extent was this a moral struggle and to what degree, a classic conflict of great powers? This course will analyze the direction of American foreign policy during an era that has been characterized as a pax americana. It will also make use of new material dealing with the Soviet approach to the postwar world by studying excerpts from recently released Soviet archives. The second half of the twentieth century also traces a trajectory from American predominance to American decline, and then, with the collapse of the Soviet Union, to American hegemony. The end of the Cold War marked the end of the bipolar world and the emergence of the United States as megapower. The question now is, will the twenty-first century be the American Century? Open to First Year students.


CRN

15261

Distribution

A/C

Course No.

PS 311

Title

Immigration and Citizenship

Professor

Elaine Thomas

Schedule

Mon 1:30 pm - 3:50 pm OLIN 307
This course examines the ways that responses to immigration have affected existing policies and practices of citizenship. The course will focus primarily on the post-World War II experience of developed countries and the practical and theoretical issues it has raised. One of the challenges that migration to these countries has presented has been that of politically integrating culturally and religiously diverse new social groups of immigrant origin. The course will explore the often contrasting ways in which different countries have confronted this task and the historical, social, and intellectual roots of variations in their approaches, and levels of enthusiasm. Topics addressed include multiculturalism, minority rights, visions of state and nationhood, nationality law, alien voting rights, migration-related social movements, and citizenship of the EU.


CRN

15257

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 317

Title

Latin American Political Economy

Professor

Omar Encarnacion

Schedule

Tu 10:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 204

Cross-listed: LAIS

This course explores the interaction of politics and the economy in Latin America. Perhaps more than any other region of the developing world, economic factors figure prominently in the political evolution and present-day configuration of Latin American countries. This is especially the case in regards to the the fate of democracy, whose fortunes in Latin America for much of the past five decades have been intimately linked to shifting conditions in the world economy. Thus, a central mission of the course is to provide students with a theoretical and empirical understanding of how economic factors and conditions - from the patterns of dependency set with European colonization to on-going efforts to create market-oriented economies - have impacted the creation of sustainable democracies throughout Latin America. The course is limited to moderated students with a background in Latin American studies, especially PS 153 - Latin American Politics.


CRN

15249

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 318

Title

Power Politics

Professor

James Chace

Schedule

Wed 10:00 am - 12:20 pm OLIN 303
The realist tradition in international relations has long been central to the method by which rulers and policymakers deal with the foreign policy of the state. This is an upper-level seminar that will concentrate on analyzing the classic works of the co-called realist tradition. Readings will include Thucydides, Machiavelli, Lorenzo dei Medici, Hobbes, Hume, Bolingbroke, Locke, Alexander Hamilton, Harold Nicolson, Henry Kissinger, Woodrow Wilson, George Kennan, Hans Morganthau, David Fromkin, and Fareed Zakaria. Theory will be combined with an historical study of power politics from 1815 to 1940. In this context, we will examine the exercise of the balance of power in Europe as against Wilsonian universalism in 20th-century America.


CRN

15255

Distribution

C

Course No.

PS 333

Title

Nations, States and Nationalism

Professor

Sanjib Baruah

Schedule

Th 10:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 204

Cross-listed: MES PIE Core Course

One of the paradoxes of the twentieth century is that increased transaction across national borders has accompanied the intensification of the forces of nationalism. The contemporary events in the former Soviet Union and in Eastern and Central Europe are only the latest examples of the power of nationalism. Yet even though we talk of national identities as if they are "natural", terms such as nations, nationalities and nationalism are difficult to define. We will examine the history of the idea of nations and the "nation state" and will read texts written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will give particular attention to nationalism's relationship to the emergence of popular sovereignty and to forces of industrialism, colonialism, modernization and mass migration.