ITALIAN

CRN 10408

Distribution

D
Course No. ITAL 201
Title Intermediate Italian I
Professor Michael Moore
Schedule Tu Th 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 201
In this course we will focus on letters and letter-writing(epistolography) both as a literary genre and as a form of personal communication. We will read excerpts from published letter collections (Gramsci's Lettere dal carcere) and epistolary novels (Ginzburg's Caro Michele) and explore the way Italians are communicating on the internet. At the same time, we will develop our own letter-writing skills through weekly letter-writing assignments (due every Tuesday) that will come to form a sequence collected in a portfolio. Portfolios must be handed in at mid-term and at the end of the course.

Prerequisite: Italian 106 or the equivalent

CRN 10409

Distribution

D
Course No. ITAL 202
Title Intermediate Italian II: Italian for Conversation
Professor Michael Moore
Schedule Tu Th 10:00 am - 11:20 pm LC 115
Making the transition from being a passive to an active user of a

foreign language can be a major hurdle for learners. Studying grammar and reading books in the foreign language is one challenge. Engaging in conversation, arguing and winning an argument is another. The purpose of this course is to create an environment in which students will have greater opportunity, cause and incentive to speak than they would in the standard foreign language classroom. The primary text is the students

themselves: their interests will dictate the subject matter at the focus of class discussions. The parallel text will be famous Italian speeches and the Italian media--print and broadcast--to expose students to rhetorical models and an Italian perspective on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Italian 201 or the equivalent.

CRN 10416

Distribution

D
Course No. ITAL 208
Title Il Giallo: Italian Detective Novels in Translation
Professor Carlo Zei
Schedule Mon Wed 11:30 am - 12:50 pm OLIN 203
Cross-listed: Literature

Since Edgar Allan Poe invented it, the detective story never went out of fashion. Alive and well both on page and on the screen, it has evolved into a surprisingly wide variety of sub-genres and styles. It probably sells more than any other kind of fiction. For a long time, the very existence of an Italian detective story was considered an "absurd hypothesis", as Alberto Savinio once said. In fact, to most writers, sunny Italy was an unlikely scene for the intrigues and machinations of diabolical criminal minds. Italian detective storywriters have to deal with this preconception, and do so re-interpreting the genre, shifting their interest from the "solution to a mystery" to the "mystery to a solution". The solution to a mystery often turns into a much more complex quest, where the crime committed, which primed the plot of the novel, is only one of the issues that the detective/reader has to face in order to establish his own identity, and justify his own investigation. During the semester we will read five novels and view movies that re-interpret the genre of the detective story. We will conduct our own investigation of works by, among others, Carlo Emilio Gadda, Antonio Tabucchi, Gesualdo Bufalino and Leonardo Sciascia.

CRN 10415

Distribution

D
Course No. ITAL 304
Title Contemporary Italian Cinema
Professor Carlo Zei
Schedule Mon Wed 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm Olin 107
What happened to Italian cinema after Fellini, Visconti, and DeSica? Do young moviemakers follow the example of these great masters or do they try to deal with their legacy in new and different ways? In this course we will view a number of recent Italian movies, most of which were never distributed in the U.S. We will examine what techniques these movies employ, what social issues they confront, and to what new genres, if any, they belong. Among other things, we will attempt to locate a "new Italian cinema" within the heterogeneous production of the nineties. Conducted in Italian; movies are in the original language, often without subtitles.