Beginning French 101 will not be taught this semester, as the Intensive Program in French will be offered in the Spring. Students who are interested in registering should contact Professor Odile Chilton as soon as possible. Below is a description of the program which will be offered in Spring 1998:

Intensive Program in French
This program is designed for beginning students who wish to acquire a strong grasp of the French language and culture in the shortest time possible. Students with little or no previous experience of French will complete the equivalent of three semesters of college French. The semester course meets ten hours a week using the French in Action video series as well as other pedagogical methods, and will be followed by a four-week stay at the Institut de Touraine (Tours, France). There, the students will continue daily intensive study of the French Language and Culture while living with French families.

FREN 103X Intermediate French

Professor: O. Chilton

CRN: 92452

Distribution: D

Time: M Tu Th 9:20 am - 10:20 am LC 118

A course designed for students who have completed Basic French or two years of high-school French. The emphasis will be placed on building vocabulary and reinforcing familiarity with grammar. Through the reading of short texts, students will be encouraged to express themselves with confidence and accuracy on a variety of topics both in speaking and in writing.


FREN 201 Intermediate French II

Professor: O. Chilton

CRN: 92453

Distribution: D

Time: M Tu Th 10:30 am - 11:30 am LC 118

For students who have completed three to five years of high-school French or who have already acquired a solid knowledge of elementary grammar. In this course, designed as an introduction to contemporary French civilization and culture, students will be able to reinforce their skills in grammar, composition and spoken proficiency, through the use of short texts, newspaper and magazine articles, as well as video.


FREN 215 Translation and Translating

Professor: A. Aciman

CRN: 92622

Distribution: B/D

Time: M W 11:00 am - 12:30 pm LC 120

Intended to help students fine-tune their command of French and develop a good sense for the most appropriate ways of communicating ideas and facts in French, this course emphasizes translation both as an exercise as well as a craft in its own right. The course will also address grammatical, lexical and stylistic issues. Translation will be practiced from English into French, and vice versa, with a variety of texts drawn from different genres (literary and journalistic). Toward the end of the semester, students will be encouraged to embark on independent projects.


FREN 305 Contemporary French Thought

Professor: M. Van Zuylen

CRN: 92624

Distribution: B/D

Time: Tu Th 1:20 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 310

This course introduces students to the major schools of twentieth-century French thought. The syllabus will draw from a selection of texts that have had particular significance for philosophy, psychoanalysis, linguistics, literary theory, and sociology. Close readings from Saussure, Barthes, Breton, Lacan, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida, Deleuze, Lyotard, Bourdieu. For those students less proficient in French, it will be possible to work on shorter texts excerpted from larger works (i.e., Derrida's Grammatologie, Deleuze's Anti-Oedipe, or Lacan's Écrits). More advanced students will have the option of concentrating more extensively on authors of their choice. Readings and discussions in French. Possibility for an extra hour of discussion in English.


FREN 316 Proust's In Search of Lost Time

Professor: A. Aciman

CRN: 92632

Distribution: B/D

Time: M W 1:20 pm - 2:50 pm OLIN 308

Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time tells of an elaborate, internal journey, at the end of which the narrator joyfully discovers the unifying pattern of his life both as a writer and human being. Famed for its style and its distinctive view of love, art, and memory, Proust's epic remains a dominant and innovative voice in the literature of self-exploration. This seminar, which is designed for all students as well as creative writers who wish to understand the complex nature of the modern novel, will examine how Proust's epic has challenged and redefined not just the art of writing, but the art of reading as well. The course will be taught in translation, but students able to read the original French are encouraged to do so.


FREN 324 Survey of 20th Century French Poetry

Professor: M. Van Zuylen

CRN: 92623

Distribution: B/D

Time: M 1:20 pm - 3:20 pm LC 118

This course surveys major trends in twentieth-century French poetry. It documents the evolution of poetic language from Rimbaud's subversive poetics in the nineteenth century to Yves Bonnefoy, perhaps the greatest living French poet. This survey will provide students both with the opportunity to practice close readings (for that it will provide an introduction to French versification), and to investigate the broader aesthetic undertakings of these poets. Particular emphasis will be placed on the triple axis of poetry, philosophy, and art history. We will begin analyzing Appollinaire's [sic] writings on art, and the subsequent impact these texts have had on comparative aesthetics (American and English in particular). Emphasis will be placed on the pivotal role of Surrealism; the Surrealists' parlor games, their interest in the working of the unconscious (écriture automatique), and lastly, their deep connection to the plastic arts. The connection between poetry and painting, and especially the development of Avant-Garde aesthetics, will be central to the course. Figures like Eluard, Breton, Aragon, and Desnos will be studied alongside painters like Dali, Ernst, Duchamps, and Balthus. The course will draw on the role of French and German philosophy in the aesthetic development of René Char, Francis Ponge, and Yves Bonnefoy. Other readings include Joyce Mansour, Saint-John Perse, Victor Segalen, Catherine Pozzi, and Philippe Jaccottet. There will be a special section on twentieth-century Francophone poets. The class will be led in French; students will be expected to do close readings of the poems as well as give oral presentations.