92098

PHIL 105

 Introduction to Philosophy

Marco Dees

M  W    11:50 am-1:10 pm

HEG 102

MBV

HUM

Is there a God? Do we have free will? What is the world ultimately like? Do we really know anything about it? What is consciousness? What is morality? Why is killing wrong? How should we live our lives?  In this course we will engage with some of the most fundamental and elusive problems in philosophy. One of the primary goals of the course is to develop a certain set of skills that are vital for tackling problems like these – in particular, the ability to reason and express yourself with clarity and rigor.  Class size: 22

 

92026

PHIL 108

 Introduction to Philosophy

David Shein

M  W    8:30 am-9:50 am

OLIN 202

MBV

HUM

Western philosophers address questions that most of us naturally find puzzling, such as: do we have free will?; do we know what the world around us is really like?; does God exist?; how should we treat one another? We will critically examine historical and contemporary texts that address these and other central themes of the philosophical tradition.  Class size: 22

 

92027

PHIL 115

 Intro to Philosophy of Mind

Kritika Yegnashankaran

 T  Th   3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 201

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior  In this course, we will think about immaterial spirits, futuristic robots, fake computers with little people inside, Martians who behave like us but have an internal structure very different from ours, brains in vats, and 'swampmen' who are formed by random aggregation of molecules. We will ask whether these strange characters have thoughts and feelings, and whether, if so, they are like us in what they think and feel. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the sake of it, but to see what light they can shed on the nature of the mind. As such, they will be our entry into investigating central issues in the philosophy of mind, such as the mind-brain-body relation, mental representation, and conscious awareness.  Class size: 22

 

92023

PHIL 203

 History of Philosophy I

Daniel Berthold

M  W    10:10 am-11:30 am

OLIN 101

MBV

HUM

A course closely examining selected texts in the history of philosophy, emphasizing historical connections and developments through the centuries from ancient Greece to 18th-Century Britain. Authors include Plato (Republic), Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics), Epictetus, Augustine (Confessions), Aquinas, Descartes (Meditations), Spinoza, Locke (Essay Concerning Human Understanding, selections), Berkeley (Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous), and Hume. Issues include the philosophy of knowledge, art, education, society, ethics, religion, reason, perception, and, centrally, philosophical methodology. This course is a requirement for philosophy majors beginning with the class of 2020. It is also a prerequisite for Philosophy 204: History of Philosophy II.  Class size: 22

 

92099

PHIL 221

 Philosophy of Science

Marco Dees

 T  Th   11:50 am-1:10 pm

RKC 101

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Science, Technology, Society  This course is an introduction to some of the main philosophical questions about the nature of science. The course will be divided into two parts. The first will be devoted to assessing different theories of scientific explanation: what is it for one thing to explain some other thing? In the second part, we will engage with the debate over scientific realism: do we have good reasons to think that our best scientific theories describe the fundamental structure of the world, or are scientific theories merely machines for describing and predicting our observations?

Class size: 22

 

92022

PHIL 234

 Philosophy, Art,  and the Culture of Democracy

Norton Batkin

M  W    11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 204

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Art History; Human Rights  How have philosophical conceptions of liberty, equality, freedom of expression, and representation defined our conception of American political democracy? How have they continued to challenge and shape our social and cultural conceptions of individuality, education, political responsibility, and social engagement? In what ways do the arts contribute to our political culture and education as citizens? In the 1990s, the defense of the arts as exemplary of democratic freedom and diversity failed to save the federal grant program for individual artists. Are the arts not just exemplary of, but fundamental to, our democratic culture, even essential to its continuation? How is reconsideration of the founding conceptions of our democracy a philosophical task? How is it a task of the arts and critical writing about the arts? We will explore these questions through discussions of philosophical works by John Locke, John Stuart Mill, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Stanley Cavell; Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s; works of feminist philosophy by Marilyn Frye and Nancy Bauer; and works of art and criticism by James Baldwin, Bruce Nauman, Glenn Ligon, Claudia Rankine, and others. In addition to reading and writing assignments for the course, students will be expected to attend parts of the Hannah Arendt Center conference “Real Talk: Difficult Questions about Race, Sex, and Religion” on October 20-21, 2016.  Class size: 25

 

92029

PHIL 237

 Symbolic Logic

Robert Martin

                                   Lab:

 T  Th   10:10 am-11:30 am

   F       12:15 pm-1:15 pm

OLIN 202

 OLIN 202

MC

MATC

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior  An introduction to logic, requiring no prior knowledge of philosophy or mathematics.  This course aims at imparting the ability to construct correct formal deductions and refutations. Our text (available on-line free of charge) covers the first order predicate calculus with identity; we will cover as much of that as feasible in one semester.  There is software for the course, called Logic 2010, developed by Robert Martin and David Kaplan at UCLA in the 1990s and subsequently rewritten for the internet, that will assist students by providing feedback on exercises.

Class size: 22

 

92028

PHIL 239

 Philosophy of Technology

Kritika Yegnashankaran

 T  Th   4:40 pm-6:00 pm

OLIN 201

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain, Behavior; Science, Technology, Society Tool use is considered by some to be the first appearance of technology in human life and part of a surge in cultural evolution that quickly catapulted us ahead of our nearest primate relatives. Painted in this light, the development and use of technology is part of what makes us distinctively human. However, some argue that we have crossed a threshold, where the degree to which we rely upon and incorporate technology in our lives now threatens to obliterate our humanity. In this course, we will examine our relationship to technology and arguments for, and against, its increasing integration into our lives.  Class size: 22

 

92100

PHIL 269

 Bioethics

Marco Dees

M  W    3:10 pm-4:30 pm

HEG 308

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Science, Technology, Society  This class is an introduction to the ethical issues that arise in the context of healthcare. The aim of this course is to develop a range of skills that will help you to think carefully about difficult issues like abortion, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, embryonic research, cloning, genetic enhancement, patient autonomy, the moral status of animals, and access to healthcare.We will study the major ethical theories that have implications for these cases, but we’ll also engage with very fundamental, general moral questions like: when does life begin? What is death? Is there a moral difference between killing and letting die? Can we have duties to those who don’t exist now but will, or could? Why is death bad? Why is killing wrong?   Class size: 22

 

92025

PHIL 385

 Philosophy of Wittgenstein

Garry Hagberg

  W       1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLIN 304

MBV

HUM

A first reading of major works of one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth-century, Ludwig Wittgenstein. ReadingsTractatus Logico-Philosophicus, The Blue Book, and The Philosophical Investigations. This course fulfills the single-philosopher requirement for junior philosophy majors.

Class size: 15

 

92024

PHIL 389

 the Philosophy and Literature of jean paul Sartre

Daniel Berthold

M          1:30 pm-3:50 pm

ASP 302

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: French Studies  The course takes its readings from a variety of Sartre's philosophic texts, including Being and Nothingness, Existentialism is a Humanism, and Anti-Semite and Jew, as well as a number of his novels and plays, including The Wall, No Exit, The Flies, and Nausea (along with Albert Camus's review). The relation between the two genres of Sartre's writing is explored, including the extent to which the philosophic and literary productions complement each other. This course fulfills the single-philosopher requirement for junior philosophy majors.  Class size: 16

 

 

Courses cross-listed in Philosophy:

 

91604

CLAS 209

 Early Greek Philosophy & Science

William Mullen

M  W    1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 201

MBV

HUM

 

91759

LIT 318

 Hannah Arendt: Political Thinking and the plurality of languages

Thomas Wild

 T         4:40 pm-7:00 pm

HEG 308

MBV

HUM

 

92055

SOC 233

 Legal Systems in Comparative Perspective

Laura Ford

 T  Th   4:40 pm-6:00 pm

OLIN 202

SA

SSCI

 

92056

SOC 341

 Capitalist and Secular?

Laura Ford

M          4:40 pm-7:00 pm

OLINLC 118

SA

SSCI