92128

FREN 201

 Intermediate French I

Odile Chilton

M T  Th 8:50 am-9:50 am

OLINLC 118

FL

FLLC

For students with three to four years of high school French or who have acquired a solid knowledge of elementary grammar. In this course, designed as an introduction to contemporary French civilization and culture, students will be able to reinforce their skills in grammar, composition and spoken proficiency, through the use of short texts, newspaper and magazine articles, as well as video.  Students will meet in small groups with the French tutor for one extra hour per week.    Class size: 20

 

91754

FREN 202

 Intermediate French II

Matthew Amos

 T  Th     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

For students with three to four years of high school French or who have acquired a solid knowledge of elementary grammar. In this course, designed as an introduction to contemporary French civilization and culture, students will be able to reinforce their skills in grammar, composition and spoken proficiency, through the use of short texts, newspaper and magazine articles, as well as video. Students will meet in small groups, with the French tutor for one extra hour per week.  Interested students should consult with Prof. Amos prior to registration.  Class size: 20

 

91757

FREN 215

 French Translation

Odile Chilton

M  W       10:10 am-11:30 am

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

Intended to help students fine-tune their command of French and develop a good sense for the most appropriate ways of communicating ideas and facts in French, this course emphasizes translation both as an exercise as well as a craft in its own right. The course will also address grammatical, lexical and stylistic issues. Translation will be practiced from English into French, and vice versa, with a variety of texts drawn from different genres (literary and journalistic). Toward the end of the semester, students will be encouraged to embark on independent projects.   Interested students should consult with Prof. Odile Chilton prior to registration.   Class size: 20

 

91755

FREN 240

 WHY LITERATURE?  Topics in French Literature

Matthew Amos

 T  Th     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLINLC 208

FL

FLLC

Serving as an overview of modern French literature, this class will focus on an assortment of texts (novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays) that reflect on themselves as texts, on themselves as literature.  From a variety of different perspectives, they all ask the question: why literature?  How can literature serve as a response to a problem (be it personal or political), or, taken from another angle, why is the questioning at the heart of literature often seemingly the sole solution?  This class will explore many of the ways in which, over the past three and a half centuries, literature has attempted to grasp its own essence.  Readings from Diderot, Rousseau, Stendhal, Balzac, Nerval, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Breton, Sartre and Duras (among others). Taught in French.  Interested students should consult with Prof. Amos  prior to registration.  Class size: 20

 

91758

FREN 354

 Literature of Private Life

Marina van Zuylen

  W          1:30 pm-3:50 pm

OLINLC 208

FL

D+J

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed:  Literature;  Gender & Sexuality Studies   The representation of private life in the nineteenth-century French novel coincided with the advent of Realism. Realism not only described the institutions that shaped private life (i.e., marriage, education, religion), but dwelled also on the discrete dramas occurring backstage--the solitude of the spinster (Flaubert's Un Cœur simple), the plight of the child (Vallès' L'Enfant, Renard's Poil de Carotte), the ambiguities of filial duties(Balzac, Eugenie Grandet, Flaubert Madame Bovary), the despair of domesticity (Maupassant's Une Vie), and the nature of neuroses (Zola, Nana). Using novels, stories, and short selections from journals and correspondences, this course will examine the emergence of writings previously considered too private, too personal to be viewed as literature. Students will also uncover the techniques that help dramatize these highly subjective conflicts (interior monologue, free indirect discourse, early examples of flow of consciousness). Issues of gender, sexuality, and the role of women in defining domesticity will be central. In order to situate these texts within a tradition that rethinks the self, there will be additional readings by Locke, Descartes, Kant, and Shaftesbury. Students will also read excerpts from recent anthologies about everyday life to examine the connection between literature, philosophy, social history, and anthropology.  Taught in French.  Class size: 20