91822

CLAS 130

 Homer FOR BEGINNERS: THE ILIAD

 AND ODYSSEY

Daniel Mendelsohn

 T  Th     11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 107

LA

ELIT

Cross-listed: Literature  The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer (ca. 8th century BCE) are the twin pillars upon which the Western literary tradition stands; between them, these two titanic works explore issues of human life and civilization—mortality and heroism; the relationships between the human and the divine, men and women, free will and fate; the confrontation between European and other cultures; the nature of poetry, tragedy and comedy—that have remained central ever since. This course, designed to introduce freshmen to more profound and sophisticated techniques of reading and thinking about literary texts than they will have thus far encountered, will consist of an intensive reading of both epics in their entirety over the course of one semester, focusing on in-depth discussion and textual explication, with a heavy emphasis on how to write critically about literary texts.  After two prefatory sessions, in which students will be introduced to the large concerns of the epic genre in general (archaic Greek civilization, the epic cycle, oral composition, the Homeric Question) and of these two works in particular (the “heroic code,” violence and warfare, the clash of civilizations, ethnography and exploration, homecoming narratives, marriage), we will read through the epics at a rate of two books per session, two sessions per week. Students will be introduced, by means of excerpts and shorter articles, to the immense scholarship on Homer, especially with respect to oral composition and the Homeric Question. A premium will be placed on participation in class discussion and timely posting to Moodle discussion boards. At least three papers, midterm, final exam.

Class size: 16

 

91725

 CLAS / HIST 201

 Alexander the Great

James Romm

M  W       11:50 am-1:10 pm

OLIN 202

HA

HIST

Cross-listed: Classical Studies  Alexander the Great changed the world more completely than any other human being, but did he change it for the better? How should Alexander be understood -- as a tyrant of Hitlerian proportions, or as a philosopher-king seeking to save the Greek world from self-destruction, or as an utterly deluded madman?  Such questions remain very much unresolved among modern historians.  In this course we will attempt to find our own answers (or lack of them) after reading the ancient sources concerning Alexander and examining as much primary evidence as can be gathered.  Students will attain insight not only into a cataclysmic period of history but into the moral and ideological complexities that surround the assessment of historical personality, whether in antiquity or in the modern world.  No prerequisite, but students will be greatly helped by some familiarity with Greek history or civilization.  Class size: 22

 

91604

CLAS 209

 Early Greek Philosophy & Science

William Mullen

M  W       1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 201

MBV

HUM

Cross-listed: Philosophy  Consideration of the principal pre-Socratic philosophers – Parmenides, Heraclitus, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Democritus and others – with respect to developments in Greek religion and science as well as to the history of philosophy. Scientific themes will include astronomy and theory of evolution.   Class size: 18

 

91726

CLAS 211

 Gender AND Sexuality IN THE Ancient World

Lauren Curtis

 T  Th     1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLINLC 115

FL

D+J

FLLC

DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies  This course explores ancient Greek and Roman ideas about human sexuality and gender difference. Examining the worlds of myth, literature, and art, we will ask how bodies, spaces, and cultural institutions were gendered in the ancient world and try to assess how ancient discourses about normative and transgressive sexual practices and gender identities may be similar or different to our own. Topics will include ancient medical writing about reproduction and childbirth, issues of power, slavery, and prostitution, the relationship between homoeroticism and education, and the performance of gender on the Athenian stage. All readings will be in English. This course is part of the World Literature offering.

Class size: 22

 

92095

CLAS 242

 Classical Mythology

Robert Cioffi

 T  Th     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLINLC 115

FL

FLLC

What is the meaning of our mythologies? How do we understand and interpret traditional stories about the past? What is the relationship between mythology and history? This course will seek to answer some of these universal questions by examining selected myths of ancient Greece and Rome and applying to them theoretical approaches to understanding and interpreting myth. We will proceed through close analysis of ancient texts in a variety of genres (epic, hymns, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, and prose summaries) as well as works of art. Topics will include: origin myths, Greek gods and heroes, war, the human-divine relationship (prayer, sacrifice, communication), madness, divine love and lust, death and the afterlife, and Greco-Roman mythology in its wider Mediterranean context. All readings will be in English translation. No previous background is required. Class size: 22

 

 

91735

ARTH 227

 Roman Urbanism

Diana DePardo-Minsky

M  W    3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AA

AART

 

92005

HIST 2110

 Early Middle Ages

Alice Stroup

 T  Th 1:30 pm-2:50 pm

OLIN 203

HA

HIST

 

 

GREEK

 

91605

GRE 106

 Intensive Greek

Robert Cioffi

Rana Liebert

M   W          10:10 am-12:30 pm

   T  Th       10:00 am-11:45 pm

OLIN 310

FL

FLLC

8 credits This course is designed for students with no experience with ancient Greek (or other ancient languages) to read authors such as Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, and Herodotus in the original language after one semester's intensive work (the equivalent of two semesters of college Greek). Daily drills and frequent quizzes on grammar and syntax will be combined from the beginning with an emphasis on developing skills for translating, reading, and interpreting Greek literature: students will begin to read short selections from classical authors after only a few weeks and longer passages by midterm. Those wishing to enroll in this course should consult with Prof. Cioffi, (rcioffi@bard.edu)  Class size: 16

 

91728

GRE 201

 Intermediate Greek: wOMEN ON THE     ATHENIAN STAGE

Lauren Curtis

 T  Th     3:10 pm-4:30 pm

OLINLC 120

FL

FLLC

This course is designed to develop reading fluency for students in Ancient Greek at the intermediate level. Focusing on the drama produced in fifth-century Athens, we will read continuous selections from two plays featuring female leads: Euripides’ tragedy, Medea, and Aristophanes’ comedy, Lysistrata. We will pay close attention to the language, style, and syntax of the Greek, while also exploring the plays’ performance settings and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Greek 107, or equivalent with permission of the instructor.  Class size: 10

 

92142

GRE 301 / 403

 Advanced Greek: Aeschylus

James Romm

 By arrangement                  -

 

FL

FLLC

 

LATIN

Students interested in learning Latin should note that Beginning Latin will be offered in an intensive format in the spring semester. For more information, contact Prof. James Romm (romm@bard.edu

 

91694

LAT 201

 Intermediate Latin

William Mullen

 T  Th     11:50 am-1:10 pm

RKC 200

FL

FLLC

Cross-listed: Classical Studies  Lucretius’ long poem is one of the fullest surviving accounts of Epicurean philosophy and, equally, a work of astonishing artistic achievement. We read substantial portions of the poem in Latin, the entire poem in English, and modern scholarly works. Our goals are: (1) to solidify knowledge of vocabulary, morphology, and syntax; (2) to gain greater fluency in reading Latin, especially Latin poetry; and (3) to consider from a variety of critical perspectives issues raised by the poem’s form and content. Open to first-year students with the requisite basis in high school Latin.

Class size: 16

 

92143

LAT 301 / 403

 Advanced Latin: Horace

William Mullen

 By arrangement                  -

 

FL

FLLC