91540

SPAN  106   

 Basic Intensive Spanish

Patricia Lopez-Gay

M T W Th .

12:40 pm -2:55 pm

OLINLC 115

FLLC

8 credits.  Cross-listed:  LAIS   This course is designed to enable students with little or no previous knowledge of Spanish to complete three semesters of college Spanish in five months (eight credits at Bard and four credits in Mexico in January). Students will attend eight hours of class per week plus two hours with the Spanish tutor. Oral communication, reading and writing skills will be developed through a variety of approaches. Prospective students must email the instructor prior to registration (plopezga@bard.edu).  Class size: 20

 

91543

SPAN  201   

 Intermediate Spanish I

Melanie Nicholson

M T W Th .

3:10 pm -4:10 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

Cross-listed:  LAIS   For students who have completed Spanish 106, 110, or the equivalent  (two or three solid years of high school Spanish). This course is designed to perfect the student's command of all four language skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing). This will be achieved through an intensive grammar review, conversational practice, reading of modern Spanish texts, writing simple compositions, and language lab work. Permission of the instructor required for students who have not completed Spanish 106 or 110 at Bard.  Class size: 20

 

91542

SPAN  202   

 Intermediate Spanish II

Nicole Caso

M . W Th .

10:10 am -11:30 am

OLINLC 210

FLLC

Cross-listed: LAIS  This course continues refining the student's mastery of the four basic skills in Spanish at a post-intermediate level. The textbook offers an integration of literature, culture, and film. Our study of both visual and written texts focuses on critical thinking, interpretation, speaking, and writing skills. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or equivalent; permission of instructor required for those who have not completed 201 at Bard. Class size: 20

 

91541

SPAN  265   

 Intro to Literary Analysis

Nicole Caso

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

OLINLC 210

FLLC

This course is designed to be a bridge between Spanish language classes and 300-level seminars of literature and culture from Spain and Latin America.  We will develop a critical vocabulary that will provide the foundation for close readings and in-depth literary analysis, and will spend considerable time working on developing skills for writing analytical essays in Spanish.  The semester will be devoted to engaging with four literary genres:  poetry, narrative, drama, and essays.  The authors on our reading list will include many of the primary writers from Spain and Latin America, whose works span the vast historical period from the middle ages and the Spanish American colony to contemporary times.  This is not meant to be a survey of all literary periods, however.  Our focus will be on acquiring the basic skills for literary analysis.  Conducted in Spanish.  Class size: 18

 

91545

SPAN  302   

 Intro to Latin American Literature

Melanie Nicholson

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

Cross-listed: LAIS  This course serves as an introduction to the interpretation of literary texts from Latin America. It covers a broad range historically—from pre-Conquest times to the present—and presents all literary genres, including poetry, short stories, novels, essays, and plays. In order to make sense of the broad chronological and geographical span of this literature, we will focus on seven separate modules, each highlighting a core moment or key figure in the development of Latin American culture. This course is intended to prepare students for more advanced and specialized seminars in Hispanic literature. Attention is paid to the expression of complex thought in response to literary texts, both verbally and in writing.  Class size: 15

 

91544

SPAN  352   

 Mapping the City in Latin American  Literature

Nicole Caso

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies; LAIS   Latin American cities have often been the site where received codes from abroad are both imitated and rearticulated based on local particularities. In this course we will read several twentieth-century texts that address the many tensions that arise in the process of modernization in the region. We will pay close attention to considerations of centers and margins, inclusions and exclusions, feelings of alienation and, ultimately, a search for community. We will explore how the danger of state violence enters domestic spaces, the role of mass media in shaping local culture, and the effects of globalization on identity formation. Among the authors we will read are Carlos Fuentes from Mexico, Roberto Arlt from Argentina, Fernando Vallejo from Colombia, Mario Vargas Llosa from Perú, and Diamela Eltit from Chile. Conducted in Spanish.   Class size: 15