By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

 

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credits may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

 

91896

MUS   104   

 Bard College Orchestra

Gregory Armbruster / Geoffrey McDonald

M . . . .

7:30 pm - 10:00 pm

FISH

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held for new members on Monday, Sept. 8th 6:30-10:00 at the Fisher Center. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7091. * The first Orchestra rehearsal will be on September 15 from 7:30 pm -10:30 pm in the Fisher Center. * (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.)

 

91426

MUS   105   

 Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 pm - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

First rehearsal will be Tues. Sept. 9th. Class size: 35

 

91442

MUS   106   

 Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

TBA

 

.

PART

Class size: 16

 

91425

MUS   108D   

 Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40 pm -6:40 pm

BITO HALL

PART

Class size: 25

 

91429

MUS   108F   

 Ensemble:Jazz

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 pm -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

91462

MUS   108G   

Chamber Ensemble for any instrument

Patricia Spencer

. T . . .

7:30 pm -9:30 pm

BDH

PART

The large variety of works written “for any instruments” invites exploration of atypical groupings – flute, marimba and tuba have been known to project wonderful blends.  This repertoire often requires a high degree of responsibility on the part of the performer: not only choosing dynamics and tempos but also instrumentation of various phrases and sometimes overall structure.  Members of this ensemble will engage in musical thinking outside the bounds of “normal” chamber music, and will discover how (or if) that may open a new dimension in their approach to more conventional performance. Class size: 6

 

91464

MUS   108G   

 Ensemble: MIXED Chamber (WIND AND STRINGS)

Patricia Spencer

. T . . .

8:30 pm–10:00 pm

BLM 004

PART

Mixing winds and strings in an ensemble offers special challenges (such as matching tonguing and bowing) as well as unique colors, and taps into a wealth of repertoire. Choices for flute and strings include classics by Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn, strong works by more recent composers (Amy Beach, Alberto Ginastera, and others) and contemporary giants such as John Harbison, Thea Musgrave and Nicholas Maw. Choices for clarinet or oboe or bassoon and strings likewise include a wide range: Mozart, Danzi, Brahms, Joan Tower, Shulamit Ran, and many more.  Class size: 6

 

91898

MUS   108G   GM

 Ensemble: Cello

Garfield Moore

. . . . F

5:00 pm -7:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

Class size: 12

 

91899

MUS   108H   

 Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Maria Sonevytsky

M . . . .

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

TBA

PART

Class size: 20

 

91626

MUS   108I   

 Ensemble: Electro-Acoustic

Marina Rosenfeld

. T . . .

6:00 pm -7:30 pm

BLM HALL

PART

Class size: 15

 

91430

MUS   108J   

 Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

91455

MUS   108N   

 Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:40 pm -6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composer’s works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting.  Class size: 12

 

91433

MUS   108P   

 Ensemble: Baroque

Alexander Bonus

M . . . .

1:30 pm -3:30 pm

BLM 117

PART

Performance ensemble focusing on music from 1600-1750. Requires an audition for acceptance.  Class size: 14

 

 

Music Courses

 

91452

MUS   145   

BIG BROTHER IS LISTENING:  Music & Politics ACROSS the Ages

Peter Laki

M . W . .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

BLM N217

AART

This course will explore two basic kinds of political music:  music written in support of a state or regime, and music written in protest against a state or regime.  Both types have a long history in the Western world, on which we will focus predominantly if not exclusively.  After surveying a few examples from the Middle Ages through the classical era, we will move to more recent points in time to investigate political music under modern democratic and totalitarian governments. Both classical and popular genres will be considered. Readings will be placed on reserve or handed out in class.  There will be three take-home exams.  Each student wiII have to do two brief presentations in class (l0 minutes each) about a piece of music with a political message, describing  the historical context and analyzing the chosen work.  The presentations will also have to be submitted in written form.  Class size: 20

 

91450

MUS   169   

 Listening to String Quartets

Marka Gustavsson

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLIN 104

AART

Many composers of string quartets reserved that particular genre for their most profound and unusual utterances. We will listen to the expressive, conversational music in this form, from its roots in the classical First Viennese School, through German Romanticism, European Nationalism, the Second Viennese School, up to and including American and European Modernism. In addition to developing tools for listening to this complex polyphonic texture, through classroom experience with recordings, and attending concerts, we will read composers’ letters such as Beethoven’s Heiligenstadt testament, as well as articles from current publications including such authors as Alex Ross, Kyle Gann, Christopher Gibbs, and Richard Taruskin. Assignments will include two papers (5 pages), one concert review, informal writing in class, and a final project. Knowledge of music notation is not required. Class size: 16

 

91437

MUS   171   

 Jazz Harmony I

John Esposito

M . W . .

9:40 am - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies Introduces the basic harmonic structures that are components of the Blues and the Tin Pan Alley songs that modern Jazz musicians used as vehicles for improvisation. Basic keyboard skills are learned including transposition. The semester includes a short historical survey of Blues and of Jazz from Ragtime to the Swing era as part of the effort to understand the practice of the technical/aesthetic fundamentals specific to Jazz as a 20th century African-American music including an introduction to the contribution of female musicians to the Jazz legacy. There is an ear-training component to this course. The melodic component includes singing the basic 20th century harmonic materials, Blues melodies and transcriptions of solos by Jazz masters. It includes the practice of the syncopated rhythmic language underlying linear melodic phrasing. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors. Required course for moderating into the Jazz program.  Class size: 25

 

91461

MUS   185   

 Intro to Ethnomusicology

Maria Sonevytsky

. T . Th .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

BLM N210

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Anthropology  This course surveys the discipline of ethnomusicology, the study of music in and around its social and cultural contexts. Through our exploration of the materiality and meaning of music, we will listen to wide-ranging examples of sounds from around the globe. We will consider ways to listen deeply and to write critically about music. We will examine how music has been represented in the past and how it is variously represented today, and will develop ethnographic research and writing skills. We will ask questions about the utility and value of music as a commodity in our everyday lives and in our globalized world. We will debate the ethics of musical appropriations and collaborations. We will examine both the foundational questions of the discipline (addressing debates about musical authenticity, musical origins, universals, comparative frameworks, and the preservationist ethos) as well as recent subjects of ethnomusicological concern. Topics will include: media and technology; post-colonial issues; music and language; hybridity; circulation and consumption; music and labor; music and gender; and the relevance of music to contemporary indigenous politics and human rights. Students are expected to read assigned readings in advance of class, participate in weekly discussions online and in class, take a midterm and final exam, and produce a variety of informal and formal written assignments (ranging from one-paragraph reading responses to two papers that are 5-7 pages in length).  Class size: 22

 

91432

MUS   201   

 Music Theory / Ear Training I

Alexander Bonus

M T W Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

BLM N217

PART

This course serves as an introduction to music theory and music making, and is the entry-level course to the classical theory sequence. Basics of musical notation will be the starting point, after which we will move quickly to scales and recognition of triads and seventh chords, as well as rhythmic performance. At all times the course will emphasize analysis of real music, and an ear-training component will reinforce the theoretical knowledge with practical experience. There are no prerequisites; the course serves as prerequisite for Music Theory II and all high-level theory courses. This fulfills theory requirements.  Class size: 20

 

91427

MUS   212   

 Jazz Literature II

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies We will study the words of Gary Gidden “Visions in Jazz” and Robert Gottlieb from his book entitled “Reading Jazz” in order to bring attention to some important literature on Jazz. Some of the writers look beyond Jazz as an art form, but also bring attention to the historical influence on culture, race, tradition and our social experience.  Writers like Albert Murry, Ralph Ellison, Eudora Welty. There is an attempt in their works to illuminate the significance of the musical potential the musicians inherit and the creative option they exercise.  This course includes the words of many who have been hailed as Jazz Greatest Musicians.  This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 16

 

91424

MUS   215   

 Introduction to Conducting

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This course will introduce the student to the basic elements of conducting.  While the development of the physical gesture and rehearsal techniques will be the primary goals, we will also work on score reading, ear training, instrumental transposition, and historical performance practice.  Repertoire will include both orchestral and choral repertoire. Evaluation will be based on the individual's improvement in gesture and rehearsal technique.  Prerequisites for the course are the successful completion of Music Theory I and II or equivalent.  Class size: 10

 

91460

MUS   218   

 Musical Exoticisms

Maria Sonevytsky

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

BLM N210

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Anthropology, Human Rights   Since Ancient Greece, Western “civilization” has defined itself against the broader world perceived to be inhabited by “barbarians.” But what do “civilization” or “barbarism” sound like? In this course, we will read and listen to examples of musical exoticisms from around the globe, exploring the connections between stereotype, sound, and the (post-) colonial condition. From Herder’s idealized “folk” to Malinowski’s “natives,” from the ritual songs of Omaha Native Americans to Stravinsky’s neo-primitivist ballets, from “pygmy pop” to the Eurovision Song Context, our class will trace how stereotypes of exoticism have appeared in a variety of musical traditions from the 18th century to the modern day. Modern political discourses of indigeneity seek to challenge and undo histories of “otherness,” yet indigenes must often struggle against the paradox of appearing “inauthentic” when they try to make a living from creative enterprises. We will explore this conundrum through classic texts on the anthropology of music, more recent works on postcolonialism and music, situating accounts of musical exoticism into the broader context of European imperialism. Along the way, we will listen to a wide variety of musics, exploring the logics of musical systems that were once labeled as “primitive.” Students will generate weekly discussion questions based on reading and listening assignments that will be posted online in advance of class meetings. There will be in-class midterm and final exams, and a variety of brief writing exercises in a range of informal and formal styles. Every week, selected students will be required to bring in an “object” to discuss in class, offering a brief presentation that explains the relevance of the object to our course’s theme.   Class size: 22

 

91465

MUS   254A   

Pronunciation and Diction for Singers I

Erika Switzer

. T . Th .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

BDH

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature. The fall semester will be devoted to the English and Italian languages, the spring to German and French. Through song literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language. No previous knowledge of the languages is required. Class size: 10

 

91469

MUS   256   

 Orchestration Workshop

George Tsontakis

. T . . .

10:10 am- 12:30 pm

BLM N217

PART

Students will learn how to score for instrumental combinations beginning with small ensembles up to full orchestra. There will be live demonstrations of orchestral instruments, listening and score study of orchestral literature, chord voicing and notation of bowings, breathing, articulations, and special orchestral effects as well as practice of basic conducting patterns and skills. Prerequisites:  Fundamentals of Music and composition workshop. There will be a reading of the orchestrations by the Bard College Orchestra.  Class size: 8

 

91445

MUS   265   

 LitERATURE AND  Language of Music II

Christopher Gibbs

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed in the late 18th and 19th centuries.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students have taken the first semester (Music 264), which covered music from the Middle Ages to 1800.  Class size: 20

 

91438

MUS   266C   

 Jazz Repertory: BEBOP Masters I

John Esposito

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies  This performance based course is a survey of the principal composers and performers of the BEBOP Era.  Musicians included are Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro, Bud Powell, Max Roach and others.  The course will include readings, recorded music and films.  The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony I or permission of instructor. This can be taken as a companion course with Jazz Harmony II. This course counts towards the music history/performance requirement for the music program.  Class size: 12

 

91434

MUS   308   

 Bach, the Baroque & Beyond

Alexander Bonus

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities  "Who was J.S. Bach?" is something of a trick question; the answer all depends on the specific historical moment at hand. Bach, the "genius" composer famous to our society, was in his own lifetime considered a far different musician, one not as admired (or even recognized) as we might assume. This seminar delves into Bach's life, his sizable musical family, and his creative influences. Some of his most revered compositions are analyzed and compared to other repertoire from the 17th and 18t h centuries. In addition, the course highlights landmark performances that served to promote Bach’s greatness in following generations. Through the work of notable musicians – including Mendelssohn, Brahms, Albert Schweitzer, Stravinsky, Casals, Glenn Gould, Wendy Carlos, and  John Eliot Gardiner-- the answer to "Who was  Bach?" is seen to transform alongside the changing ideals of modern Western culture.  Grades are determined through weekly reading and listening assignments, an exam, and a final project in which class members build an online Bach performance and research archive. Counts towards the music history requirement.

Class size: 14

 

91431

MUS   320   

 Musical Electronics

Robert Bielecki

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course concentrates on the creative use of electronic circuitry and the construction of devices for musical applications.  Students will develop an understanding of how basic electronic components are used in audio circuits and how to read schematic diagrams. We’ll discuss topics such as Voltage Control, Synthesis, Filtering, Waveshaping, Phase Shifting, Ring Modulation, Theremins, Circuit Bending, etc. We’ll work from existing designs and also create new devices as we hone our skills of soldering, point-to-point wiring and layout.   Familiarity with basic electronics and the use of hand tools is helpful but not a prerequisite for this class.  Enrollment limited.   Class size: 14

 

91428

MUS   332   

 Jazz: The Freedom Principle II

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies This is a survey course in Jazz History, which is part II of a four- part course. This is a study of Jazz from 1927 to 1942, the big band or swing era.  Emphasis will be on band leaders such as Jimmie Lunceford, Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, Teddy Wilson, Count Basie and Duke Ellington. This course employs a cultural approach designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music from 1927 to 1942 and examine its’ effect on the music.  This will be illustrated with recordings, films and videos. This class requires oral presentation and critical listening.  Class size: 15

 

91466

MUS   340   

INTRODUCTION TO Experimental Music

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course deals with the experimental tradition starting from Henry Cowell’s radical innovations early in the 20th century, through those of his students, pre-eminently John Cage and others of the “California School” of the 30’s and 40’s, and “The New York School” around Cage that included Feldman, Brown, Wolf and Tudor in the 50’s. The primary focus however will be on the development of new forms, media and social organizations begun in the sixties and seventies, as exemplified by: text-based “event” pieces of the international Fluxus movement; the early minimalist works of La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich and Philip Glass; live electronic music of AMM in London, Musica Elettronica Viva in Rome and Sonic Arts Union in New York; the work of Cornelius Cardew and the Scratch Orchestra in London; and the influence of “open form” “free jazz” and “creative music” in establishing improvisationally-based compositional techniques and systems in the works of Anthony Braxton, George Lewis and others. In addition to studying the works this tradition has produced and discussing their aesthetic and philosophic underpinnings, students will be encouraged to realize and perform works by these composers, and to create new ones of their own.  Class size: 12

 

91441

MUS   351   

 ANALYZING Late Beethoven

Kyle Gann

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

Ludwig  van Beethoven's last  five piano sonatas and last five string quartets, along with the Ninth Symphony, Missa Solemnis, and last two cello sonatas, have long had a reputation  as the most profound  and transcendent music ever written, unsurpassed  in depth and modernity. Starting with the "Archduke" Trio, this course  will go through Beethoven's music of 1811 to 1827,  his late period, with primary attention  to how he increasingly  molded all movements of a multi-movement  form from a single  idea, and also how he managed to overlay genres such as sonata  form, variations, and fugue into a single  movement, in a synthesizing apotheosis of classical  form that no successor ever followed  up on. In addition, we will also consider his minor works of the period- canons, folk song arrangements, marches- to gain a fuller view of what constituted a composer's daily life in the 1820s. The course is intended to satisfy a theory requirement for music majors, but might instead  be used for a music  history requirement if the student 's midterm  and final papers take that approach.  Class size: 22

 

91624

MUS   352   

 Electronic, electro-Acoustic and computer Composition

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Composition assignments isolating problems of form, technique and materials will help students explore the process of making and performing electronic music. Each student will be expected to create original work throughout the semester and bring this to class for discussion and critique. Analyses and class presentations of relevant works by such composers as Stockhausen, Lucier, and Oliveros, will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This course fulfills music theory requirement.  Class size: 15

 

91453

MUS   356   

 Arranging Techniques: Jazz

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 pm -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This composition class will focus on the various techniques used in jazz ensemble writing from trio to quintet ensembles with heavy emphasis on rhythm section arranging. Final projects will be recorded or performed live at the end of the semester. This is an advanced seminar class for moderated music majors. Prerequisite are Jazz Composition I and II or the permission of the instructor.  Class size: 10

 

91625

MUS   358   

 Sound / Art

Marina Rosenfeld

. T W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

BLM N110

PART

What is "sound art" and how does it intersect with the visual? the musical? the sculptural? Is it sound that prioritizes a relationship to architecture and space over time and performance? That refuses the category of the musical? Or that recuperates concerns such as noise, silence, site and performance, and incorporates them back into music? How do the shifting categories of 21st century arts free the artist to work across traditional disciplinary boundaries? Reading and writing, in-class study of key works, and creative student work will be undertaken in this course to explore how and why “sound” or the sonic has become a key contemporary form. Class size: 15

 

91440

MUS   359   

 ANALYSIS OF The Classics of Modernism

Kyle Gann

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

The decades from 1910 to 1970 saw an explosion of dissonance, complexity, and apparent musical chaos. And yet, beneath the surface it was also an era of unprecedented intricacy of structure and musical systematization. The liberation of dissonance and dissolution of melody left composers insecure, and they often compensated by creating systems of tremendous rigor not always apparent to the listener. This course will analyze in depth several works that changed the way we think about composing, and which pioneered the growth of an atonal musical language. Explore the cinematographic intercutting of Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps; the tonal axis system of Bartok's Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion; the elegant number structures of Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time; the delicate symmetries of Webern's Symphonie Op. 21; the total organization of Stockhausen's Gruppen; the fanatical precision of Babbitt's Post-Partitions; and the compelling multi tempo climaxes of Nancarrow's Study No. 36. Intended for music majors, but other strongly motivated students are welcome. Prerequisite: Theory 1 and 2 or the equivalent (ability to analyze tonal harmony).  Class size: 22

 

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS:

Workshops carry 2 credits, unless otherwise noted.

 

91960

MUS   WKSH ES   

 Workshop: GERMAN DICTION

Erika Switzer

TBA . . . .

TBA

BITO HALL

PART

This course reviews German pronunciation and phonetic spelling and applies these systems to solo vocal repertoire with regard to clarity, ease, expression, and interpretive choices.  This course is available to moderated voice majors by recommendation of the instructor and audition for the graduate committee of the Conservatory's Vocal Arts Program. Class size: 16

 

91446

MUS   WKSH   GKM

 Sonata & Duo Workshop

Erica Kiesewetter

Marka Gustavsson 

Blair McMillen

. T . . .

4:00 pm -6:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This workshop will explore the wide repertoire of sonatas with instrument and piano, as coached by the professors. Students may sign up as a pre-formed group or be placed. Open to college and conservatory students by recommendation or audition.  Class size: 12

91467

MUS   WKSHA   

 Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

3:00 pm -5:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility.

Class size: 8

 

91443

MUS   WKSHB   

 Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart

. T . Th .

. . W . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

4:00 pm -6:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students choose one of the three sessions.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.  Students choose one of three sections.  Class size: 25

 

91435

MUS   WKSHD   

 Sight Reading Workshop

Michael DeMicco

. T . . .

12:00 pm -1:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills.  Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake

book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C

(concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well.  Class size: 14

 

91471

MUS   WKSHF   CV2

 Beginner Samba School

Carlos Valdez

. . . . F

2:05 pm -4:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  Samba School provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggae)  Class size: 30

 

91470

MUS   WKSHF   CV

 Advanced Samba School

Carlos Valdez

. . . . F

12:00 pm -2:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  Samba School provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggae)  Class size: 30

 

91457

MUS   WKSHL   

 Workshop: Opera Workshop

Teresa Buchholz / Rufus Müller / Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

4:40 pm -7:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Opera Workshop:  In the Fall Semester, we prepare a themed program of operatic excerpts (choruses, ensembles, solos), which is then performed in the Fisher Center, fully staged and with orchestra,  in the early part of the Spring Semester. Typically this involves intensive rehearsals during the week before Spring Semester, and evening rehearsals in the first week of semester. Students enrolling in the Fall Semester for two credits thus commit themselves to the final rehearsals and performances in the Spring Semester, which earn them an additional two credits.  Enrollment is by audition. Please contact Professors Müller (rumu2000@earthlink.net) and LoMonaco (ilka98@aol.com) for details.  Class size: 30

 

91456

MUS   WKSHM   

 OH LA LA!  Love AND Passion in French Song

Rufus Müller

M . . . .

4:40 pm -7:00 pm

BITO HALL

PART

Song recitals can be so stale or overwrought.  In this performance-oriented course for singers and pianists, our particular emphasis is on how to communicate vividly with our audience, as well as providing guidance on French diction and style.  Class size: 12

 

91463

MUS   WKSHN   

 "Hands-on" Music History

Patricia Spencer /

Peter Laki

. T . . .

4:40 pm -7:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits Members of this class will explore our musical past by playing it!  Also improving sight reading, the course will cover a sampling of chamber music from different eras.  Members will build familiarity with a wide variety of harmonies and musical styles (mostly European) from the Renaissance through the present.  Background readings and class discussion about the composers will provide historical context for the works being played. Parts and scores will be provided one week in advance for those who prefer to prepare their sight-reading.  Composers may include but are not limited to: Gesualdo, Machaut, di Lasso, Monteverdi, Purcell, Frederick the Great, J.S. Bach and his sons, Vivaldi, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Dvorak, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Ravel, Copland, Cage, Carter, Rzewski and many more.  Works will not be rehearsed to a performance level, but may occasionally be repeated.  Class size: 6

 

91454

MUS   WKSP3   

 Workshop: Jazz ImprovISAtion I

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40 pm -7:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits This class serves as an introduction to jazz improvisation. It is intended for incoming jazz ensemble players who would like to develop as improvisers, or classical players who would like to explore improvisational techniques in a jazz framework.  Class size: 12

 

91458

MUS   WKSP7   

 Jazz Vocal Workshop

Pamela Pentony

. . . Th .

2:00 pm -4:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  Beginning level course:  The Jazz Vocal Workshop is a performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance.  How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements.  Particular attention is paid to phrasing.  The language of scat singing, with emphasis on practice in every class.  The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications taken from The Great American Songbook.  There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues.  There is a final exam in this class.   Class size: 16

 

91451

MUS   WKSPP   

 ADVANCED Orchestral Audition Prep.

Erica Kiesewetter

. . . Th .

4:00 pm -6:00 pm

BITO 202

PART

2 credits  This class is for advanced violinists (and violists) who would like to learn orchestral excerpts for festival and orchestra auditions. The student is expected to bring in new excerpts every week; the class will involve detailed coaching on the excerpts including a focus on understanding the work in context and the composer's style, advice on preparation and performance anxiety and mock audition practice.   Class size: 6

 

Special Projects - Special Projects are designed for music majors only to pursue individual or group projects with a particular Professor.

 

91952

MUS   PROJ   EK

Erica Kiesewetter

 

 

 

PART

91944

MUS   PROJ   AB

Alexander Bonus

 

 

 

PART

91929

MUS   PROJ   CG

Christopher Gibbs

 

 

 

PART

91930

MUS   PROJ   EL

Erica Lindsay

 

 

 

PART

91931 

MUS   PROJ   ES

Erica Switzer

 

 

 

PART

91932

MUS   PROJ   JB

James Bagwell

 

 

 

PART

91933

MUS   PROJ   KG

Kyle Gann

 

 

 

PART

91934

MUS   PROJ   PL

Peter Laki

 

 

 

PART

91935

MUS   PROJ   TB

Thurman Barker

 

 

 

PART

91468

MUS   PROJ   JT

Joan Tower

 

 

 

PART

91444

MUS   PROJ   LGR

Luis Garcia-Renart

 

 

 

PART

91444

MUS   PROJ   JE

John Esposito

 

 

 

PART

 

PRIVATE LESSONS – (register for lessons with a drop/add form.)

Please Note:   In order to receive credit for lessons a student must be enrolled in an ensemble or performance class. There is a $150.00 Private Lesson Fee each semester for any student taking private lessons.  If a student decides to drop private lessons they must fill out a Drop/Add form, have it signed by the appropriate department faculty and deliver it to the Office of the Registrar on or before Wednesday, September 17, 2014, 5 PM or they will be charged and responsible for the $150.00 Department Fee. Students who opt to take lessons not-for-credit will be responsible for the full cost of the lessons themselves.  Not available for on-line registration. Please note: you can audit an ensemble, but you cannot audit lessons. Private Lessons are offered as follows:

 

Ø  Erika Allen – classical piano

Ø  David Arner - piano (jazz, classical and improvisation)

Ø  Teresa Buchholz – classical voice

Ø  Ira Coleman - jazz bass

Ø  Mike DiMicco - jazz guitar

Ø  Greg Dinger - classical guitar 

Ø  Daniel Fishkin-  Serge modular synthesizer

Ø  Laura Flax – clarinet

Ø  Amy Garapic - percussion

Ø  Otto (Richard) Gardner - bass

Ø  Greg Glassman - jazz trumpet

Ø  Marka Gustavsson – violin, viola

Ø  Stephen Hammer - oboe and recorder

Ø  Bruce Jackson – classical bass

Ø  Ryan Kamm - classical bass

Ø  Erica Kiesewetter – violin

Ø  Ilka LoMonaco- classical voice

Ø  Blair McMillen - piano

Ø  Garfield Moore – cello

Ø  Rufus Müller – classical voice

Ø  Peter O'Brien - jazz drums

Ø  Sakiko Ohashi - piano

Ø  Pamela Pentony - voice (jazz)

Ø  Patricia Spencer - flute

Ø  John Thomas - trumpet (classical and jazz)

Ø  Carlos Valdez - Latin jazz percussion

Ø  Bruce Williams - jazz and classical saxophone