91516

HR   101   

 Introduction to Human Rights

Thomas Keenan

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLIN 202

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies;  (HR core course.)  An intensive introduction to contemporary discussions of human rights in a broad context. The course mixes a basic historical and theoretical investigation of these contested categories, 'human' and 'rights,' with some difficult examples of the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic dimensions of claims made in these terms. What are humans and what count as rights, if any? We will ask about the foundations of rights claims; about legal, political, non-violent and violent ways of advancing, defending and enforcing them; about the documents and institutions of the human rights movement; and about the questionable 'reality' of human rights in our world. Is there such a thing as 'our' world? The answers are not obvious. We will try to find them by exploring, among other things, the French and American revolutions, the 'decline of the nation-state' (Arendt), humanitarian intervention (medical and military), public space and democracy, testimony and information (from Shoah to the CNN effect), war crimes and the concept of the civilian, and the challenges to human rights orthodoxy posed by terrorism and the wars against it. Using The Face of Human Rights (Walter Kalin) as our primary text, along with work in philosophy, history, literature, politics, and with the contemporary news flow, we will examine some tricky cases and troubled places, among them our own.  Class size: 25

 

91967

HR   226   

 Women’s Rights, Human Rights

Robert Weston

. T . Th .

11:50am – 1:10 pm

OLINLC 118

SSCI/diff

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies  (core course)   This course provides students with a broad overview of women’s struggles for liberation from the global patterns of masculine domination. Following a brief overview of first wave feminism, the bulk of the course engages students with second wave feminism—including, the critical appropriations and contestations of marxism, structuralism & psychoanalysis characteristic of post '68 feminist theory—post-structuralist theories of sexual difference, écriture féminine, 70s debates surrounding the NOW & ERA movements, and turning at the end of the course to the issues of race & class at the center of third wave feminism. While serving as a survey of the major developments in feminist theoretical discourse, the course is framed from a global human rights perspective, always mindful of issues ranging from suffrage, property rights & Equal Pay, to forced marriage, reproductive rights & maternal mortality, female genital mutilation, sex-trafficking, & prostitution, to coeducation, Lesbian, & Transgender rights. Readings may include texts ranging from Wollstonecraft, Stopes & Fuller, to Beauvoir, Friedan, Solanas, Koedt, Dworkin, Duggan, MacKinnon, & Allison (the "Feminist Sex Wars"), to Rubin, Wittig, De Lauretis, Traub, Irigaray, Kristeva, Cixous, Butler, Walker, Baumgardner, Richards, Moraga, Andalzùa, et al. Class size: 20

 

91990

HR   229   

 Human Rights AND DEMOCRACY IN CONTEMPORARY RUSSIA

Dmitry Dubrovsky

. T . Th .

11:50am – 1:10 pm

 HEG 204

SSCI

Human rights in contemporary Russia is a contested category. In the early 1990s political elites were very skeptical about these words, while at the same time they were widely used among the general population. Today it almost the reverse:  it has become quite popular among political elites to explain foreign and domestic politics in terms of human rights, but at the same time human rights and the human rights movement are both in serious crises on the ground.  This course will seek to understand how and why human rights have fallen off the popular agenda in Russia today. We will explore a set of questions in the history of the late Soviet Union and Russia, investigate debates between human rights activists and liberal reformers, and study in depth the tragedy of the 90s, where human rights were sacrificed for stability and the "nostalgic" modernization of the country We will also explore the politics and human rights in the post-Soviet space, including Crimea. Class size: 18

 

91950

HR 245   

 Humanism and Antihumanism in 20th century french thought

Eric Trudel

. T . Th .

3:10 pm - 4:30 pm

OLIN 202

HUM

Cross-listed:  French Studies  (HR core course)   What is the legacy of humanism and its very long tradition in twentieth-century French thought? So strong was once the belief in its values that humanism came to be equated, in France, with republicanism and the Declaration of the Rights of Man. And yet, the humanists’ affirmation of the centrality of man – the “measure of all things” –, their faith in the dignity of man, their commitment to reason, progress and universal truth came under severe attack throughout the century, under the influence of Marx, Nietzsche and Heidegger, to be ultimately denounced as nothing more than a construct of “petit bourgeois” ideology. Althusser praised Marx for having reduced to ashes the “myth” of man, Foucault celebrated its disappearances “like a face drawn in the sand at the edge of the sea”, and Derrida painstakingly undermined the metaphysical foundation of subjectivity. What happens to ethics and politics when what appears to be its very foundation is withdrawn? Does antihumanism signal the end of responsibility?  This course surveys the ongoing, contentious and often violent debate between humanism and antihumanism in France throughout the 20th century. Our goal will be to understand, for instance, how Sartre, who ferociously mocked humanism in the 1930s came to declare, after the war, that Existentialism is a Humanism; to grasp why Simone de Beauvoir could plead for an Ethics of Ambiguity while Camus condemned all form of revolutionary action, even when conducted in the name of justice. Along the way, we will examine how this debate is tied to the understanding of the role of the intellectual, and issues of colonialism, feminism, political activism and environmentalism. Texts include fictions and essays by Antelme, Bataille, de Beauvoir, Benda, Bergson, Camus, Deleuze, Derrida, Fanon, Ferry, Foucault, Irigaray, Lévinas, Malraux, Merleau-Ponty, Mounier, Nizan, Rancière, Ricœur, Sartre, Todorov, Weil and others.   Class size: 22

 

91639

LIT / HR  2509   

 Telling Stories about Rights

Nuruddin Farah

M . W . .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

OLIN 201

ELIT/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Human Rights (core course)  What difference can fiction make in struggles for rights and justice? And what can this effort to represent injustice, suffering, or resistance tell us about about fiction and literature? This course will focus on a wide  range of fictions, from a variety of writers with different  backgrounds, that tell unusual stories about the rights of  individuals and communities to justice. We will read novels addressing human migration, injustices committed in the name of the  state against a minority, and the harsh conditions under which some  communities operate as part of their survival strategy, among other  topics. We will look at the ways in which literary forms can allow universalizing claims to be made, exploring how racism, disenfranchisement, poverty, and lack of access to education and  health care, for instance, can affect the dignity of all humans.  Readings may include: Chronicles of a Death Foretold by Garcia Marquez; Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson; Smilla’s Sense of Snow by Peter Hoeg; Our Nig by Harriet Wilson; Balzac & the Chinese Seamstress by Sijai Dai; Winter is in the Blood by James Welch ; The Way to Rainy Mountain by N. Scott Momaday; Wolves of the Crescent Moon by Yousef Al-Mohaimeed, and Bound to Violence by Yambo Ouleguem. We will also watch a number of films based on the novels (including Chronicles, Smilla's Sense, Balzac, Snow Falling), and The First Grader (2001, on the right to education in Kenya). 

Class size: 22

 

91961

 HR  324   

COLLECTIVITY, DIFFERENCE, AND POLITICS

Ann Seaton

. T. . .

3:10 pm-5:30 pm

OLINLC 210

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities  From Surrealism to the Black Panthers, collectives have intervened in art, politics, and public space. The “collective” model challenges the model of the artist as individual genius/producer, and even the notion of the work itself. Is a collective a person?  Collective activity can seem to simulate Deleuzian theory in practice; collectives evoke aesthetic, economic, and ontological crises. Collective activity has intensified in the last few decades—amidst social media and the global rise in economic stratification. Collective practices have been particularly important for black, female, and LGBTQ subjects. Such interventions may be connected to discussions around HIV/AIDS, anti-racism, queer/trans identities, and/or critiques of the art world itself. The Combahee River Collective, Gran Fury, the South African Gugulective, the British Otolith Group, the Haitian Ghetto Biennale, and the global/NYC-based How Do You Say Yam in African form a partial list. We will consider the creative works produced by collectives in juxtaposition with Deleuze, Adrian Piper, Clement Greenberg, Audre Lorde, and Angela Davis. We will also read recent texts by Huey Copeland, Tavia Nyong'o, Kodwo Eshun, Anjalika Sagar, George Lewis, and Claire Tancon. Written work will include response papers and a mid-term essay. Students will also work in 3-5 person teams that will invent and propose “collectives.” Each collective will write a manifesto and design a proposal for a group exhibit. Prospective students should submit a page of interest to aseaton@bard.edu.  Class size: 15

 

91958

HR   338   

 Human Rights and the Global Economy

Peter Rosenblum /

Ashwini Sukthankar

. . . . F

10:10 am- 12:30 pm

OLIN 301

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Economics, Global & Int’l Studies  The modern human rights movement emerged at the end of the Cold War with a focus on states and an arsenal appropriate to civil and political repression. Economic and social rights were acknowledged in law, but overlooked or disdained in practice.  The transformation of the global economy since the end of the Cold War – including the increased importance of transnational trade, investment and global corporations – forced advocates to rethink their focus on the state and to develop new tactics for confronting major economic actors.  This class will explore the complicated history of the global corporation in relation to the rights of workers and citizens in the societies where they operate.  The course traces the evolution of these relationships, with case studies on the British East India Company, the economic legacy of slave labor in American  Universities, the Indian Swaraj campaign, United Fruit Company, the Chilean copper nationalization and the South African divestment campaign.  The second half of the class is devoted to the rise of economic activism using contemporary human rights tactics.  We will look at current work that addresses particular sectors (e.g., consumer goods, natural resource extraction, and agriculture), regions (e.g., Africa) and issues (e.g., child labor, women's empowerment).  Class size: 15

 

91882

HR   339   

 Terror, Torture, Drones: trapped

 in the emergency state

Mark Danner

M . . . .

3:10 pm -5:30 pm

OLIN 308

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies  Those hijacked jet liners on September 11, 2001 brought with them not only death and destruction on an unprecedented scale but a darker era in American foreign policy. The United States invaded and occupied Afghanistan and Iraq and launched an aggressive worldwide campaign to root out Al Qaeda, mostly fought, in Dick Cheney's phrase, "on the dark side." Terror gave way to counter-terror, much of it in the hands of elite special operations forces and intelligence officers who made increasing use, as President Bush gave way to President Obama, of unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. Though the elements of this new "dark-side war," particularly its use of torture and drones, seemed new in US history, in fact it was built on top of a long tradition, dated back to the National Security Act of 1947, of a powerful and untouchable "emergency state." In this seminar we will explore the roots of that emergency state and trace its rise and elaboration during the Cold War, then study its final flowering in the months and years after September 11. As we explore we will ponder the ways by which our country, seventy years after World War II and a dozen after the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, might free itself from the grip of permanent emergency -- and construct a different, democratic foreign policy.  Class size: 18

 

91792

HR / SST  346   

 Studies in Obedience: THE MAN AND THE EXPERIMENT THAT SHOCKED THE WORLD – STANLEY MILGRAM AT YALE

Stuart Levine

M . . . .

3:00 pm -6:00 pm

Arendt Center

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Human Rights  It has now been more than fifty years since the original work of Stanley Milgram at Yale University demonstrated the remarkable and widely unpredicted finding that large numbers of individuals in multiple samples of American men and women studied were willing to "punish" another person when ordered to do so by an experimenter; this in the context of a psychology experiment on learning and memory.  The prominence of the initial work and the continued salience of such study, including the pronounced ethical considerations and the necessary generalizability to societal and historical contexts cannot be over-stated.   As recently as five years ago a replication of the original study with only slight modifications was published (J. Burger, January 2009) and more recent studies reveals that “obedience” is very much prevalent in our society and in many others as well.  Also the ethical debate and ecological validity controversy have not lessened. But aside from the volume of investigations the current domain of the "Milgram study” is especially worthy of continuing interest; this because of historical events in the intervening years since1960.  The seminar will convey that the continuing study of obedience phenomena is vital for the betterment of institutions - even in a democratic society - and that social scientists must find a way to safely and ethically investigate the conditions that promote destructive obedience and learn the rudiments of how it can be minimized. This is an upper college seminar.  It is designed for moderated social studies majors and even those from other divisions of the college, who will require permission of the instructor to enroll. Criteria for membership are a willingness to read with care and then with conviction share the results of such reading and study.  (The title for this seminar is taken from the biography of Stanley Milgram authored by Thomas Blass, a professor of social psychology at the University of Maryland Baltimore County campus. Class size: 10

 

91643

ANTH   261   

 AnthropOLOgy OF Violence AND Suffering

Laura Kunreuther

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

OLIN 203

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed: Asian Studies, Gender & Sexuality Studies,  Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights (core course), Science, Technology & Society  Why do acts of violence continue to grow in the ‘modern’ world?  In what ways has violence become naturalized in the contemporary world?  In this course, we will consider how acts of violence challenge and support modern ideas of humanity, raising important questions about what it means to be human today.  These questions lie at the heart of anthropological thinking and also structure contemporary discussions of human rights.  Anthropology’s commitment to “local culture  and cultural diversity has meant that anthropologists often position themselves in critical opposition to “universal values,” which have been used to address various forms of violence in the contemporary world. The course will approach different forms of violence, including ethnic and communal conflicts, colonial education, torture and its individualizing effects, acts of terror and institutionalized fear, and rituals of bodily pain that mark individuals’ inclusion or exclusion from a social group.  The course is organized around three central concerns.  First, we will discuss violence as a means of producing and consolidating social and political power, and exerting political control.  Second, we will look at forms of violence that have generated questions about “universal rights” of humanity versus culturally specific practices, such as widow burning in India and female genital mutilation in postcolonial Africa. In these examples, we explore gendered dimensions in the experience of violence among perpetrators, victims, and survivors. Finally, we will look at the ways human rights institutions have sought to address the profundity of human suffering and pain, and ask in what ways have they succeeded and/or failed.  Readings will range from theoretical texts, anthropological ethnographies, as well as popular representations of violence in the  media and film.  Class size: 22

 

91787

HIST   2631   

 Capitalism and Slavery

Christian Crouch

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLIN 201

HIST

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies, American Studies,   Human Rights (core course),  LAIS   Scholars have argued that there is an intimate relationship between the contemporary wealth of the developed world and the money generated through four hundred years of chattel slavery in the Americas and the transatlantic slave trade. Is there something essential that links capitalism, even liberal democratic capitalism, to slavery? How have struggles against slavery and for freedom and rights, dealt with this connection? This course will investigate the development of this linkage, studying areas like the gender dynamics of early modern Atlantic slavery, the correlation between coercive political and economic authority, and the financial implications of abolition and emancipation.  We will focus on North America and the Caribbean from the early 17th century articulation of slavery through the staggered emancipations of the 19th century. The campaign against the slave trade has been called the first international human rights movement – today does human rights discourse simply provide a human face for globalized capitalism, or offer an alternative vision to it?  Questions of contemporary reparations, rising colonialism and markets of the nineteenth century, and the 'duty' of the Americas to Africa will also be considered.  Readings will include foundational texts on capitalism and a variety of historical approaches to the problem of capitalism within slavery, from economic, cultural, and intellectual perspectives.  There are no prerequisites, although HIST 130, 2133, or 263 all serve as introductory backgrounds. Class size: 22

 

91460

MUS   218   

 Musical Exoticisms

Maria Sonevytsky

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

BLM N210

HUM/DIFF

 

91610

LIT   2051   

 Douglass & Du Bois

Alexandre Benson

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLIN 306

ELIT/DIFF

 

91614

LIT   214   

 Cairo Through its Novels

Dina Ramadan

. T . Th .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

OLINLC 120

FLLC

 

91633

LIT   3232   

 Palestinian LitERATURE  in Translation

Elizabeth Holt

M . . . .

10:10 am- 12:30 pm

ASP 302

FLLC/DIFF

 

91632

LIT   358   

 Exile & Estrangement Fiction

Norman Manea

M . . . .

3:10 pm -5:30 pm

OLIN 107

ELIT/DIFF

 

91754

SCI   130   

 Nuclear & ChemICAL Weapons

Simeen Sattar

. . W . .

6:00 pm -7:30 pm

HEG 102

N/A

 

91561

ANTH   331   

 TOXIC MODERNITIES: AnthroPOLOGY

 in AND of THE  Nuclear Age

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

. . . Th .

10:10 am- 12:30 pm

Albee 106

SSCI

 

91644

ANTH   350   

 Contemporary Cultural Theory

Laura Kunreuther

. T . . .

10:10 am- 12:30 pm

OLIN 307

HUM/DIFF

 

91669

HIST   190   

 The Cold War: Enemy/Globalism

Gennady Shkliarevsky / Mark Lytle

M . W . .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 103

HIST/DIFF

 

91677

HIST   2127   

 THE GENEALOGY OF Modern RevolutionS IN THE Middle East

Omar Cheta

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

OLIN 309

HIST

 

91675

HIST   2237   

 Radio Africa: Broadcasting History

Drew Thompson

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLIN 203

HIST

 

91784

HIST   2255   

 Law in the Middle East from ottoman edicts to contemporary human rights

Omar Cheta

M . W . .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

OLIN 309

HIST

 

91785

HIST   2306   

 Gender AND Sexuality IN Modern China

Robert Culp

. T . Th .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

OLIN 202

HIST/DIFF

 

91780

HIST   242   

 20th Century Russia: CommUnIsm

 AND NatIOnAlIsm

Gennady Shkliarevsky

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLIN 205

HIST

 

91781

HIST   280A   

 American Environmental Hist I

Mark Lytle

. . W . F

10:10 am- 11:30 am

OLIN 204

HIST

 

91676

HIST   3149   

 THE HISTORICAL Politics OF Africa's Civil Wars

Drew Thompson

. T . . .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

HEG 201

HIST

 

91775

PHIL   260   

 Feminist Philosophy

Daniel Berthold

. T . Th .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

OLIN 201

HUM/DIFF

 

91779

PS   104   

 International Relations

Christopher McIntosh

M . W . .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

OLIN 202

SSCI

 

 

91791

PS   109   

 Political Economy

Sanjib Baruah

M . W . .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

RKC 101

SSCI

 

91980

PS 167

QUEST FOR JUSTICE: FOUNDATION OF LAW

Roger Berkowitz

M . W . .

3:10 pm– 4:30 pm

OLINLC 208

HUM

 

91815

PS   239   

 United Nations and Model UN

James Ketterer

. . . . F

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLIN 205

SSCI

 

91816

PS   280   

 Nations, States, and Nationalism

Sanjib Baruah

M . W . .

10:10am - 11:30 am

RKC 100

SSCI

 

91817

PS   358   

 Radical American Democracy

Roger Berkowitz

. T . . .

4:40 pm -7:00 pm

ARENDT CENTER

SSCI

 

91543

PS   363   

 Ethics & International Affairs

Christopher McIntosh

. T . . .

10:10 am- 12:30 pm

OLIN 310

SSCI

 

91818

PS   368   

 Promoting Democracy Abroad

Omar Encarnacion

. T . . .

10:10 am- 12:30 pm

ASP 302

SSCI

 

91803

SOC   120   

 Inequality in America

Yuval Elmelech

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

OLIN 204

SSCI/DIFF

 

91809

SOC   138   

 Introduction to Urban Sociology

Peter Klein

. T . Th .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

OLIN 205

SSCI

 

91802

SOC   205   

 Introduction to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

. T . Th .

10:10 am- 11:30 am

HDRANX 106

MATC

 

91810

SOC   269   

 Globalization, Social Conflict, and Citizenship

Peter Klein

. T . Th .

4:40 pm -6:00 pm

OLIN 203

SSCI

 

91819

SOC   246   

 A CHANGING AMERICAN RACIAL ORDER? Race, Ethnicity & Assimilation

Joel Perlmann

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

OLIN 101

SSCI/DIFF

 

91801

SOC   267   

 Media, Power & Social Change

Sarah Egan

M . W . .

11:50 am -1:10 pm

HEG 102

SSCI

 

91808

SOC   346   

 Governing the Self

Allison McKim

. . . Th .

1:30 pm -3:50 pm

OLIN 303

SSCI

 

91858

THTR   343   

 Latino Theater and Performance

Jorge Cortinas

. . W . .

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

FISH CONF

PART/DIFF