91755

SCI†† 125A

Photographic Processes

Simeen Sattar

M . . . .

. . W . .

8:30- 10:30 am

8:30- 11:30 am

HEG 106 /

ROSE 205

SCI

Topics covered in this course range from the chemistry of silver and non-silver photographic processes to the physics of CCD cameras.  Laboratory work emphasizes the chemical transformations involved in making gum dichromate prints, cyanotypes, blueprints, salted paper prints and black-and-white silver emulsion prints.  Registered students undertake to review elementary topics from high school chemistry and take an online quiz before the start of the semester to assess their understanding of these topics.Class size: 18

 

91756

SCI†† 125B

Photographic Processes

Simeen Sattar

. T . . .

. . . Th .

3:00-5:00 pm

3:00-6:00 pm

HEG 106 /

ROSE 205

SCI

See above.Class size: 18

 

91754

SCI†† 130

Nuclear & ChemICAL Weapons

Simeen Sattar

. . W . .

6:00 pm -7:30 pm

HEG 102

N/A

(1 credit) Cross-listed: Human RightsNuclear and chemical weapons are much in the news and likely to remain so. Consequently, students aiming for careers such as journalism and foreign service will benefit from a working knowledge of the terminology associated with these weapons.For nuclear weapons, we will begin by developing familiarity with the atomic nucleus and types of nuclear reactions.We will then focus on uranium, from mining to enrichment to its uses in nuclear reactors and in fission bombs.We will conclude by discussing reprocessing spent reactor fuel to concentrate plutonium, which is also used in fission bombs.For chemical weapons, we will start with the structures of the small molecules that make up these weapons and go on to their classification, design and destruction. (This course will meet for the first 8 weeks of the semester.) Class size: 18

 

91757

SCI†† 161

Astronomy

Peter Skiff

. T . Th .

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

HEG 102

N/A

An introductory course in astronomy and astrophysics, developing the current status of knowledge and theories of the solar system, individual stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium. Theories of particular unique objects (quasars, pulsars, supernovae, X-ray stars, and black holes) will be discussed in terms of models of stellar, galactic, and cosmic evolution. ††Class size: 36

 

91758

SHP†† 222

THE History OF Science before Newton

Peter Skiff

. T . Th .

3:10 pm -4:30 pm

HEG 102

HIST

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society;related interest:Classical Studies††† An introduction to the history and philosophy of science. T. S. Kuhn's model of historical progress will be used to examine selected parts of discourses involving pre‑Socratic philosophy, mythology, Copernican astronomy, Galileo's trial, and Newton's philosophy. A critique of method will introduce modern historiographic and philosophic controversy. Designed as a core course for studies in history, philosophy, and sociology of science; no prior mathematical or technical expertise will be presumed at this level. Readings include excerpts from the Enuma Elish, the Milesians, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Plato, Aristotle, Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Newton. Secondary commentary by Nahm, Butterfield, Kuhn, Munitz, and others.†† Class size: 18

 

91759

SHP†† 225

Einstein

Peter Skiff

. . W . F

1:30 pm -2:50 pm

HEG 102

N/A

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & SocietyAn examination of Einsteinís life and work, the impact of his work on current world views, and some of the many controversies involved therein, using biography and popular descriptions of the relativity theories, atomic theories, and optical theories. We will compare the advantages of methods of positivism and realism in philosophy and of "internalism" and "externalism" in the history of science. Readings include some primary sources; secondary authors include Overbye, F`lsing and Holton. Accessible to students with no prior college‑level scientific or mathematical experience. Class size: 36