91683

BIO†† 144

Biostatistics

Arseny Khakhalin

. . W . F

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 115

MATC

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Intíl Studies, Mathematics†††This course introduces students to the statistical methods biologists use to describe and compare data. Students will learn methods are appropriate for different types of data. Topics covered include elementary probability and statistics, characteristics of frequency distributions, hypothesis testing, contingency tests, correlation and regression analysis, different ways to compare means, nonparametric tests, and an introduction to multivariate tests. This course is intended for sophomore and junior biology majors, although it is open to students of all years.  One objective of the course is to provide biology majors the statistical background they need to analyze data for their own senior research; biology students should take this course before their senior year, if possible. Notice, though, that the topics in this course are applicable to many advanced courses. Prerequisite: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic and at least one introductory biology course.

Class size: 18

 

91681

BIO†† 153A

Global Change Biology

Bruce Robertson

†††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. T . Th .

. . . . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 115

RKC 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & Intíl StudiesGlobal change biology is a new field of biology which explores the consequences of global environmental change for ecosystems and humans.This introductory level course focuses on climate change as a key driver of environmental change.We will explore the effects of climate change on the ecology of animals, plants, and microbes, includingbiodiversity and ecosystem function, but will also include discussion on how these biologically oriented questions relate to the interconnected issues of human society, politics, and the economy. In addition, we will focus on relevant physical topics including the astronomical basis for natural variation in climate (years to eons), basics of global weather (e.g. gyres and Hadley cells), glacial cycles and marine circulation. In the laboratory portion of the course students will analyze ice core data, and use a bevy of tools to predict changes in the timing of migration in birds and butterflies, and predict how climate change will affect the distribution and range of plant and animal species. This course is appropriate for students interested in continuing their studies in biology, and also for motivated students whose primary interest is in other disciplines.Class size: 18

 

91682

BIO†† 153B

Global Change Biology

Bruce Robertson

††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. T . Th

. . . . F

3:10 -4:30 pm

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 115

RKC 112

SCI

See above.Class size: 18

 

92290

BIO†† 155

Botany

Sasha Wright

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

M . W ..

. . . Th .

3:10 - 4:30 pm

1:30 - 4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 112

SCI

Imagine a super toxin that killed every living plant on earth: how long do you think we would have before we felt the impact? Could human civilization survive forever without plants? This course, intended for students considering majoring in Biology, provides an introduction to the essential components of botany including: morphology and basic plant identification, photosynthesis, respiration, cellular function, reproduction, and the use of plants in human society. We will work from textbooks and spend a substantial amount of time discussing how to read and utilize primary literature. Labs will be used to familiarize ourselves with plant form and function, with special emphasis on campus plants.Class size: 18

 

92353

BIO†† 156

INTRODUCTion to cancer cell BIOLOGY

Andrea Henle

. T . Th .

Lab: M

8:30 - 9:50 am

1:30-4:30 pm

RKC 111

RKC 114

SCI

Where are we in the war against cancer?   Intended for students considering majoring in biology, this introductory course, will focus on current research in cancer biology.  We will examine cancer from a historical perspective to understand its origins and diagnosis, and how potential treatments are developed.  Primary research articles describing key experiments in cancer biology will be analyzed and discussed to introduce the importance of the scientific method, experimental design, and data analysis.  In the laboratory, we will investigate signaling pathways in cancer cells and explore common techniques used for cancer diagnosis. Class size: 18

 

91684

BIO†† 201

Genetics and Evolution

Michael Tibbetts

M . W . .

10:10 am -1:10 pm

RKC 111/112

SCI

Cross-listed:Mind, Brain & Behavior;Global & Intíl Studies†† This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity in eukaryotic organisms.This course takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern molecular and genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity.In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication,recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to our understanding of the processes involved in generating population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can help us identify the myriad genetic and non-genetic factors influencing these traits.The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the genetic manipulation of a model organismís genome to address one or more topics in the course.. This is a writing intensive course. Regular short writing assignments will be required, along with two 10-page essays (see below). We will meet for weekly hour-long writing labs. General goals are to help with the development, composition, organization, and revision of analytical and exploratory prose; the use of evidence to support an argument; strategies of interpretation and analysis of texts. Students will be responsible for their mechanics of grammar and documentation.Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher.Class size: 18

 

91685

BIO†† 202

Ecology and Evolution

Felicia Keesing

. . W . .

. . . . F

8:30 - 11:30 am

9:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114/115

RKC 114/115

SCI

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies†† This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding.Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher.Class size: 18

 

91686

BIO†† 208

Biology Seminar

Bruce Robertson

. . . Th .

12:00 pm -1:00 pm

RKC 103

 

1 creditThis course will provide students with broad exposure to biology through the biology visiting speaker seminar series. Students will hear about the wide-ranging research interests of invited biologists and have opportunities to interact informally with them. The course is graded Pass/Fail and students are responsible for short follow-up assignments for at least 80% of the talks. Recommended for all biology majors and other interested students.

Class size: 55

 

92329

BIO†† 301

BIOCHEMISTRY

Andrea Henle

†††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

M . W . .

. . W. .

8:30 Ė 9:50 am

1:30 - 4:30 pm

RKC 111

RKC 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior†† An introduction to general biochemistry, including protein structure, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, coenzymes, thermodynamics, central metabolic pathways, biological membranes, DNA structure and replication, and ribosomal translation.  An emphasis is placed on integrating knowledge of fundamental organic chemistry into a biological context. Laboratory work provides practical experience in the topics covered. Offered in alternate fall semesters.Prerequisites: Biology 141, Chemistry 201-202.†† Class size: 16

 

91687

BIO†† 302

Molecular Biology

Michael Tibbetts

. T . Th .

M . . . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

1:30 pm -4:30 pm

RKC 111

RKC 112

SCI

This course explores molecular aspects of gene expression in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Topics include DNA structure, replication, and repair; DNA transcription; RNA structure and processing; and polypeptide synthesis. The course also covers various mechanisms involved in the regulation of gene expression. Emphasis is placed on a review of the current literature and the experimental approaches used in modern molecular biological research. The laboratory provides practical experience in such current techniques used in molecular biology as molecular cloning, restriction enzyme mapping, DNA sequencing, and nucleic acid hybridization. Prerequisites: Biology 201, Chemistry 201‑202.Class size: 16

 

92291

BIO†† 334

PLANT SIGNALING AND PHYSIOLOGY

Sasha Wright

†††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

M . W ..

. T . . .

10:10-11:30 am

1:30 - 4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 112

SCI

In this class we will explore physiological, developmental, morphological, and anatomical adaptations of flowering plants to diverse environments. We will utilize readings from textbooks, popular science, and the primary literature to explore concepts such as: drought adaptation, seed dormancy, plant hormone signaling, phytoremediation, and biorobotics. Students will be expected to lead critical discussions of special topics in the primary literature. Labs will be an opportunity to design experiments to address some of these concepts in more detail. Prerequisite: Upper college standing in Biology.

Class size: 15

 

91689

BIO†† 425

Neuroscience Revolutions

Arseny Khakhalin

M . . . .

4:40 pm -6:40 pm

RKC 200

 

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior (2 credits ) New scientific ideas often stir controversies and inspire hot debates, with schools of thought arguing and clashing over them. Some of these ideas eventually make it into textbooks, becoming a new dogma, while some get marginalized and forgotten. In this seminar we will talk about controversies in neurobiology: those that transformed the field in the past, and those that are debated now, on the cutting edge of modern neuroscience. Discussion will be based on an examination of current primary research. Prerequisite: Upper College standing in biology or permission of the instructor.Class size: 12

 

91690

BIO†† 426

Vector Biology

Amy Savage

. . . Th .

1:00 pm -3:00 pm

HDR 101A

 

(2 credits)Viral, parasitic, and bacterial diseases transmitted by insect vectors cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this seminar, we will focus on a variety of insect vectors responsible for transmitting some of the most significant diseases of our global society.  Emphasis will be placed on the biology of the insects, including factors such as behavior, immune defenses,and life cycle which all contribute to disease transmission. Understanding these features will allow us to appreciate the complexities associated with disease control.  Discussion will be based on an examination of current primary research. Prerequisite: Upper college standing in biology.Class size: 12