91591

WRIT 121A  Beginning Fiction Workshop

Benjamin Hale

. . W . F

11:50–1:10 pm

OLIN 306

PART

This course involves both intensive reading and writing of the short story, and is intended only for first-year students who have made prior forays into the writing of narrative. This course is open to first-year students only. Class size: 12

 

91859

WRIT 121B  Beginning Fiction Workshop

Benjamin Hale

. . W . F

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 101

PART

See above.

 

91594

WRIT 122   Introduction to Nonfiction

Susan Rogers

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 301

PART

This course is for students who want to write “creative” essays. Creative nonfiction is a flexible genre that includes memoir, the personal essay, collaged writings, portraits and more.  They can range from lyrical to analytical, meditative to whimsical. We will read a range of works and then offer up our own creative experiments. In particular we will pay attention to the relationship between language and ideas. Weekly writings and readings. No prior experience with creative nonfiction is needed.   This course is open to first-year students only. Class size: 12

 

91587

WRIT 123   First Poetry Workshop

Michael Ives

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 101

PART

Open to students who have never had a workshop in poetry, and who desire to experiment with making their own writing a means of learning, both about literature and poetry, and about the discipline of making works of art.  Attention is mainly on the student's own production, and in the individual’s awareness of what sorts of activities, rhythms, and tellings are possible in poetry, and how poets go about learning from their own work. The central work of the course is the student's own writing, along with the articulation, both private and shared, of response to it. Readings will be undertaken in contemporary and traditional poets, according to the needs of the group, toward the development of familiarity with poetic form, poetic movement, and poetic energy. Attendance at various evening poetry readings and lectures is required. This course is open to first-year students only.

 

91588

WRIT 123 A  First Poetry Workshop

Robert Kelly

. . W . F

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 101

PART

See above.  Class size: 12

 

91733

WRIT / THTR 207   Writing Plays with

Demons and Ghosts

Chiori Miyagawa

.  . W . .

1:30 - 4:30 pm

FISHER PAC

STUDIO NORTH

PART

See Theater section for description.

 

91593

WRIT 221 A   Intermediate Fiction Writing

Joseph O'Neill

M . . . .

11:50 -2:10 pm

OLIN 101

PART

This is an intermediate-level fiction workshop, suitable for students who have either completed the First Fiction Workshop or done meaningful writing and thinking about fiction on their own. In addition to critiquing student work, we will read selected published stories and essays and complete a series of structured exercises.  Registration was completed for this class in May. Class size: 12

 

92297

WRIT 221 B   Intermediate Fiction Writing

Jedidiah Berry

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

RKC 200

PART

 

91590

WRIT 232   The Eye is the First Circle:

Nonfiction Prose

Benjamin Hale

. . . Th .

3:10 -5:30 pm

OLIN 303

PART

“… the horizon which it forms is the second,” Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote, “and throughout nature this primary figure is repeated without end.  It is the highest emblem in the cipher of the world.”  In this course, we will work on how to see closely and write closely: to train our eyes to cipher the world as keenly as we can, and write it down.  This will be a nonfiction workshop, focusing less on personal memoir and more on exploring, honing our powers of observation, and uniquely capturing our explorations on paper.  Readings will include Emerson, Geoff Dyer, Eula Biss and Will Self, among others.  This course will involve a lot of long walks.  Students will be expected to write an average of 3-4 pages per week.  Registration was completed for this class in May. Class size: 12

 

91374

WRIT / FILM 256   Writing the Film

So Yong Kim

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PART

See Film section for description.

 

91586

WRIT 322   Advanced Poetry Workshop

Michael Ives

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 101

PART

Writing and reading are closely aligned habits. In this Workshop we will read and write in tandem, critique each other’s work, and pay special attention to the art of revision. Registration was completed for this class in May. Class size: 12

 

91546

WRIT 324   Advanced Fiction Workshop

Mary Caponegro

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 107

PART

A workshop in the creation of short stories, traditional or experimental, for experienced writers. Students will be expected to write several polished stories, critique each other's work, and analyze the fiction of published authors.  Registration was completed for this class in May. Class size: 12

 

91595

WRIT 3500 A  Advanced Fiction: The Novella

Mona Simpson

TO BE ARRANGED

 

.

PART

The first semester of a yearlong class, intended for advanced and serious writers of fiction, on the "long story" or novella form. Students will read novellas by Henry James, Flaubert, Chekhov, Flannery O'Connor, Allan Gurganus, Amy Hempel, and Philip Roth (and perhaps others) using these primary texts to establish a community of reference. We will discuss technical aspects of fiction writing, such as the use of time, narrative voice, openings, endings, dialogue, circularity, and editing, from the point of view of writers, focusing closely on the student's own work. The students will be expected to write and revise a novella, turning in weekly installments of their own work, and of their responses to the assigned reading.  The course will meet six times over the semester, dates to be announced.  Registration was completed for this class in May. Class size: 12

 

91547

WRIT 405   Senior Colloquium:Written Arts

Mary Caponegro

M . . . .

4:45 -6:30 pm

OLINLC 120

 

Written Arts Majors writing a project are required to enroll in the year-long Senior Colloquium.   Senior Colloquium is an integral part of the 8 credits earned for Senior Project.  An opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among students, the colloquium explicitly addresses challenges arising from research and writing on this scale, and presentation of works in progress.  A pragmatic focus on the nuts and bolts of the project will be complemented with life-after-Bard skills workshops, along with a review of internship and grant-writing opportunities in the discipline. Senior Colloquium is designed to create a productive network of association for student scholars and writers: small working groups foster intellectual community, providing individual writers with a wide range of support throughout this culminating year of undergraduate study in the major.