91804

PSY 121   History and Systems and

People of Psychology

Stuart Levine

. . W . F

11:50 -1:10 pm

RKC 101

SSCI

Over the course of the semester we study theoretical insights and conceptual attempts to understand human behavior.  These are traced from the speculations within the Ancient World to current scientific thinking and methods guiding the study of psychology and other social science disciplines.  Importantly, because a discipline is also about people who advance it, students are introduced to the lives and times and ideas of individuals who have made significant contributions to the field.  Particular attention is given to such figures as James, Pavlov, Freud, Skinner and Asch, to mention just a few.  Illumination will also come from a consideration of correspondence between and among pivotal individuals in the field.  Critical analyses and integrations are juxtaposed with historical renderings.  Upper college students likely will benefit from this course because they already possess the foundational knowledge necessary to draw comparisons and critically evaluate varying points of view.  Lower college students likely will use the course to greet the intellectual domains they enter. Class size: 22

 

91800

PSY 141A  Intro to Psychological Science

Barbara Luka

M . W .  .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

RKC 103

SSCI

How does the mind create the reality we perceive? How do experiences shape the brain, and how do processes in the brain influence thought, emotion and behavior?  This course investigates these and similar questions by studying the science of the human mind and behavior. The course covers topics such as memory, perception, development, psychopathology, personality, and social behavior. A focus is on the biological, cognitive, and social/cultural roots that give rise to human experience. Additionally, the course will consider how behavior differs among people, and across situations.  Class size: 40

 

91841

PSY 141B  Intro to Psychological Science

David Shaenfield

. . W . F

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN LC 115

SSCI

See above.  Class size: 40

 

91616

PSY 203   Statistics for Psychology

Kristin Lane

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

RKC 103

MATC

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods of statistics and is aimed at helping the student to gain a fundamental understanding of the tools needed to understand and conduct research in psychology. Topics to be covered include frequency distributions and probability, descriptive statistics, simple correlation and regression, sampling distributions, t-tests and basic and factorial analysis of variance. Non-parametric tests such as Chi-square will also be introduced. The course will focus on the interpretation and communication of statistics, and we will work with the SPSS software package to analyze data.  This course is the first of a two-course sequence in statistics and research methods that is required of all prospective psychology majors. The course is ordinarily taken in the first semester of the sophomore year. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychological Science or its equivalent.  Class size: 34

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LAB Options for PSY 203: (register separately)

 

91617

PSY 203 LBA  Statistics for Psychology Lab

Kristin Lane

. T . . .

10:30 - 12:30 pm

HDR 101A

MATC

Class size: 17

 

91618

PSY 203 LBB  Statistics for Psychology Lab

Kristin Lane

. T . . .

1:30 -3:30 pm

HDR 101A

MATC

Class size: 17

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91856

PSY 212   Personality Psychology

David Shaenfield

. . W . F

11:50 – 1:10 pm

OLINLC 115

SSCI

This course focuses on personality as a theoretical and empirical field. We will consider theoretical perspectives and their implications for personality development, psychological adjustment, and everyday behavior. Specific themes include psychodynamic, humanistic, trait, social-cognitive and biological perspectives. We will examine topics such as motivation and cognition, how we relate to others, the stress-depression link, and identity as we consider the biological, cultural and social context of personality. Particular focus will be given to the applications of personality theory to behavior in clinical (focusing on personality disorders) and healthy populations. Research methods and assessment strategies for understanding personality will be explored and critically evaluated. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychological Science or permission of instructor.    Class size: 22

 

91801

PSY 231   Neuroscience

Frank Scalzo

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLINLC 115

SSCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior   The ability to express thoughts and emotions, and to interact with the environment, is dependent in large part on the function of the nervous system. This course will examine basic concepts and methods in the study of brain, mind and behavior. Topics include the structure and function of the central nervous system, brain development, learning and memory, emotion, sensory and motor systems, the assessment of human brain damage, and clinical disorders such as schizophrenia, epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. Prerequisite: Introduction to General Psychology, Introduction to Developmental Psychology or Introduction to Biology.  Class size: 22

 

91803

PSY 221   Developmental Psychology

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

. . W . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 202

SSCI

Cross-listed: Gender & Sexuality Studies  To develop is to change. From birth to death, we are constantly changing as we grow – sometimes we gain skills, sometimes we lose them. In this class, we will study the balance of growth and decline across the lifespan, and think carefully about the unique characteristics of people at each life stage. We will explore many changes from infancy through old age, including: cognition, physical maturation, social interaction, gender, language, and cultural influence. Textbook, research articles, and popular writings on the nature of growth and decline at different life stages will be used to facilitate discussion and writing. Class size: 24

 

91802

PSY 230   Cognitive Psychology

Barbara Luka

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 201

SSCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior   Cognitive psychology is the study of mind: how we perceive the world, remember, represent knowledge, acquire new information, become aware of our emotions, make plans, reason, and use language. In this course we examine the empirical foundations that determine our understanding of mind, including classic research designs, recent advances in computational modeling, philosophical perspectives, and changes in cognition throughout the lifespan. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychological Science.  Class size: 22

 

91832

PSY 319   Current Treatments of Psychological Disorders

Richard Gordon

. T . . .

9:30 – 11:50 am

HEG 200

SSCI

The field of psychotherapy has undergone something of a quiet revolution over the past 50 years, with new therapies focusing on helping people change their thinking or behaviors and in some instances placing a greater focus on the social and interpersonal context in which symptoms occur.  Such treatments do not deny the importance of such traditional factors as the relationship between patient and therapist, but place a greater emphasis on functioning in the present,  on achieving change within relatively shorter periods of time and on demonstrating their effectiveness.   In this course, following a brief review of traditional therapeutic concepts, we will focus on the treatments that have for a spectrum of disorders including the various anxiety disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, depression, and bipolar disorder.  Readings will consist of selections from a high-level, multi-authored text as well as several journal articles.  Students will be expected to make oral presentations of material in class and to write a substantial research/review paper.  Prerequisites:  Moderated in psychology, and a course in either Abnormal Psychology or Developmental Psychopathology. Class size: 15

 

91613

PSY 359   Comparative Cognition

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

M . . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

HEG 300

SSCI

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior   Comparative cognition explores the evolutionary origins of the human mind by comparing the cognitive abilities of humans and other animals. The primary focus of this course will be the evolutionary underpinnings of social cognition. We will investigate this topic through discussion of empirical literature comparing the abilities of human children and nonhuman animals (including apes, monkeys, dolphins, birds, and dogs). In particular, a large amount of research has targeted “theory of mind”, or the understanding that outward behaviors are caused by internal states (thoughts, beliefs), and not necessarily the actual state of affairs. Do chimpanzees interpret others’ behaviors in the same way we do? Are there differences in the perspective-taking abilities of domesticated mammals and wild mammals? What experimental methodologies might be used to answer these questions, and how might these change based on the species we’re investigating? Our discussions will focus on readings from empirical papers, theoretical essays, and books. Open to upper college students with relevant coursework in social, developmental or cognitive psychology, biology, philosophy, or computer science.  Class size: 12

 

91614

PSY 381   Classic and Contemporary Research In Social Psychology

Stuart Levine

M . . . .

3:00 -5:20 pm

LB3 302

SSCI

The discipline of social psychology as we know it; that is as the scientific study of the effects of the presence of other people in our life space, can be traced around the beginning of the 20th century.  Norman Triplett published the first research based article (1898) in the field.  He investigated in a controlled manner the effects of the presence of other individuals on an aspect of timed human performance.  More definitively the field of social psychology was established with the publication of two "textbooks" about the discipline in 1908.  The English psychologist William McDougall and the American sociologist Edward Ross are given credit for establishing the original boundaries and cross discipline domain of the field of study.  Beyond this Floyd Allport  placed emphasis on the use of experimental methodology, and thus may be considered the founder of the discipline as we largely know it today.  Social Psychology is thus a century in duration and as such it has been significantly marked by a recent publication by Psychology Press of “The Handbook of the History of Social Psychology” (2012).  This seminar is designed primarily for moderated students in psychology, but is open to others across many disciplines who have a background in reading original source materials in the literature of their chosen field.  Assignments will be paired classic and contemporary studies compiled from within topics investigated within the domain of social psychology; these drawn from persistent topics of the field namely, attitude measurement, theory and change and the study of social influence.  Such topical studies are reviewed in order to assess the persistence over time of the issues explored by those who seek to understand the particulars of social behavior.  In this manner we will also study the history of the discipline.  Class size: 10

 

91622

PSY COG   Cognitive Psychology:

Advanced Methodology

Barbara Luka

. . . Th .

2:30 -4:30 pm

PRE

 

(2 credits) This course provides opportunities for research experience in studies of language comprehension. The majority of time in this course will consist of independent laboratory research (working with participants, analyzing collected data, reviewing recently published empirical papers, improving academic writing skills). Students will complete a short literature review and develop a research proposal. Independent research projects often span two consecutive semesters. Open to first, second and third year students with consent of the instructor.  Class size: 6

 

91612

PSY DEV   Developmental Psychology:

Advanced Methodology

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

. . . Th .

2:30 -4:30 pm

PRE

 

Cross-listed: Mind, Brain & Behavior  (2 credits)  In this course, students will participate in laboratory research in child developmental psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on 3- to 5-year olds' social cognition, perspective-taking, and memory in the context of games. The majority of time in this course will consist of independent laboratory work and research, and students will work with young children, parents, and members of the community to initiate research protocols in our Preston-based laboratory . There will be a weekly laboratory meeting, readings, assignments, two short papers (a literature review and a summary of your empirical project) and student presentations. Open to first-year, second-year and junior students with consent of the instructor. (This course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.)   Class size: 5

 

91624

PSY NEU   Neuroscience: Advanced Methodology

Frank Scalzo

. T . . .

1:30 -3:30 pm

PRE 101

 

(2 credits)  In this course, students will participate in laboratory research in developmental psychopharmacology, behavioral neuroscience, neuroanatomy and/or neurobehavioral teratology using the zebrafish as an animal model. Within these general fields, specific roles of neurotransmitter systems in normal behavioral development and the neurobehavioral effects of chemical insults during early development will be investigated.  The majority of time in this course will consist of independent laboratory work and research. There will be a weekly laboratory meeting, readings, assignments, two short papers (a literature review and a summary of your empirical project) and student presentations. Open to first-year, second-year and junior students with consent of the instructor (this course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits).  Class size: 8

 

91619

PSY SOC   Social Psychology:Advanced Methodology

Kristin Lane

. . . Th .

2:30 -4:30 pm

PRE

 

(2 credits)This course provides hands-on experience in the practice of Social Psychology. Students will work individually and in teams on ongoing research projects in the Social Psychology Laboratory. The realm of topics to be studied includes the roots of unconscious bias, the gender disparity in the sciences, and behavior change.  Students will participate in all phases of the research process, including developing stimuli, programming studies, conducting experimental sessions, and coding and analyzing research data. Requirements include attendance at weekly lab meetings, two papers, a lab presentation, and other assignments throughout the semester.  Enrollment is open to first-, second-, and third-year students with the permission of the instructor. Students are expected to enroll for two consecutive semesters. (This course may be taken for a maximum of eight credits.) Class size: 6