91688

PS 104   International Relations

Michelle Murray

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 205

SSCI

(PS core course)  Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights  This course provides an introduction to competing theories about the structure, functioning and transformative potential of the international system.  Part 1 deals with the traditional problem of international life, maintaining order among relatively equal states in a condition of anarchy.  Part 2 calls the assumption of anarchy into question by looking at hierarchical power relationships in a variety of issue areas.  Part 3 addresses contemporary challenges to the state’s authority and the problems of governing in an increasingly global community.  Throughout the course an effort will be made to illustrate the relevance of theoretical disagreements for the real world.  Students will be evaluated on their understanding of the assumptions and logics of competing theories as well as their ability to apply those theories to historical and contemporary global problems.  Class size: 22

 

91689

PS 109   Political Economy

Sanjib Baruah

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 305

SSCI

(PS core course)   Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies; Human Rights   The term Political Economy refers to the interrelationship between politics and economics. However, political scientists and economists do not always use the term in the same sense. Even within these two disciplines the term has multiple meanings. The course will review the ideas of a few major thinkers such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Karl Polanyi, Thorstein Veblen, John Maynard Keynes, and John Kenneth Galbraith, and will introduce students to two subfields in particular: international political economy and the political economy of development. Among the questions we would ask are: Why are some countries rich and others poor? What is development? What are the prime movers of globalization? Is the US an empire given its influence and power in the global economy? How can development be redefined to tackle the challenge of climate change? Among issues that we will look at closely is the role of organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization in managing the global economy and the current debates about reforming these institutions.  Class size: 22

 

91791

PS 115   Intro to Political Thinking

Michiel Bot

M . W . .

1:30 - 2:50 pm

RKC 102

SSCI

(PS core course)  From Plato to Nietzsche, great thinkers in the Western tradition have asked about the nature and practice of political action. Thinking about politics is, knowingly or not, conducted against the background of this shared tradition.  This is no less true of political thought that aims to break away from “the classics” than of political thought that finds in them a constant resource for both critical and constructive thinking.  This course explores fundamental questions of politics through a core body of writings.   Class size: 22

 

91793

PS 122   American Politics: Issues and Institutions

Simon Gilhooley

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

HEG 102

SSCI

(PS core course ) Cross-listed: American Studies This course introduces students to the basic institutions and processes of American government. The class is meant to provide students with a grasp of the fundamental dynamics of American politics and the skills to be an effective participant in and critic of the political process. During the semester, we will examine how the government works, interpret current political developments and debates, and consider how to influence the government at various levels.  Class size: 22

 

91794

PS 181   American Political Thought

Simon Gilhooley

. . W . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 205

SSCI

Cross-listed:  American Studies  The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to American Political Thought. Drawing upon material from across the entire span of American history, we shall attempt to develop an understanding of concepts such as democracy, liberty, individuality, and republicanism, and to discuss how understandings of each of them have influenced political and social choices in what is now the United States. Readings will include Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Emma Goldman, among others. Class size: 22

 

91690

PS 214   US-Latin American Relations

Omar Encarnacion

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 301

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Global & Int’l Studies;  LAIS  Despite common origins as off springs of European colonialism and close economic and political ties during their respective period of independence and state-building, conflict rests at the heart of the relationship between the United States and the nations of Latin America.  This course unpacks the historical and ideological roots of that conflict, how it has developed over the course of the years, and what possibilities exist for its resolution in the future.  The course is divided into three main sections.  The first one covers the years between the Spanish-American War of 1898 and the events leading to World War II.  It emphasizes U.S. attempts at creating a "sphere of influence" over Latin America, highlighted by numerous military interventions in places like Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, as well as Latin American responses to what they perceived to be an American project of imperialism.  The second section focuses on the dynamics of the Cold War as played out throughout Latin America.  It emphasizes the real and perceived fears by U.S. policy-makers about the advent of Marxist-inspired revolutions in Latin America, which led to interventions in Cuba, Chile, and Guatemala, among other nations, and the high toll that the Cold War exacted upon the peoples of Latin America.  The third and final section looks at the most salient issues in contemporary U.S-L.A. relations: economic integration, the illicit drug trade, and Latin American migration to the United States. Class size: 20

 

91691

PS 231   Humanitarian Military Intervention

Michelle Murray

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 204

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights (core course) When should states use military force to alleviate human suffering?  Does the need to intervene to stop human rights violations outweigh the right of states to maintain control over territory?  The international states system is built upon the principles of sovereignty and nonintervention.  Yet over the past two decades human rights have emerged as an increasingly accepted justification legitimizing the use of force.  This apparent tension between the respect for state sovereignty and the inevitable violations that result from the use of military force for humanitarian purposes is at the center of the debate over human rights in the field of international relations.  This course explores the dilemmas and controversies surrounding the use of force for humanitarian purposes.  The first part examines the major ethical, political and strategic arguments for and against humanitarian military intervention.  The second part focuses on specific instances where states undertook, or failed to undertake, a humanitarian military intervention (for example, Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, Sudan, Libya and Syria, among others).  Through an examination of particular case studies, we will better understand why the international community has such an inconsistent record of stopping humanitarian crises and what the limitations and possibilities of human rights are in international politics.  Class size: 20

 

91694

PS 234   Occupy Political Theory: Social Theory Critics from Montesquieu to Marcuse

David Kettler

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 304

SSCI

This seminar examines the challenges to Political Theory from Social Theory (initiated by Montesquieu, expanded by Rousseau and Ferguson, and developed in the nineteenth century by Harriet Martineau, Karl Marx, and Peter Kropotkin).   Twentieth-century continuators are Karl Mannheim and Herbert Marcuse.   As the title suggests, the course examines thinkers who challenge the social foundations that they maintain actually give meaning to the political forms that ordinary political theory takes as its focus, just as the recent Occupy movement challenged the ordinary terms of reference of American democracy. Class meetings will alternate between lecture and discussion sessions.  Class size: 18

 

91795

PS 236   US Politics in the Long Term

Simon Gilhooley

. . W . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

FISHER ANNEX

SSCI

Cross-listed:  American Studies  Why are there two parties in America? Why is there no universal healthcare? Why did the Civil Rights Movement happen in the 1950s and 1960s? This course takes up some of these questions by exploring the historical origins and development of contemporary issues in American politics. Taking up a different theme each week (such as race, welfare, or political parties), the course will discuss the ways in which we can see these areas of politics as the consequence of developments occurring over long periods of time. Exploring the consequences of decisions made in the past, the unintended results of policies, and the development of institutions we shall attempt to understand how American politics has come to be the way that it is, and how and when political change has been effected in the United States. Class size: 22

 

91975

PS 239   The United Nations and Model U.N.

Jonathan Becker /

James Ketterer

. . . . F

1:30pm – 2:50 pm

OLIN 202

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights   1 credit* This is a year-long course,  divided into two parts. The first part will explore the history of the United Nations and will introduce students to its structure and principal aims. It will also focus on the role of specialized agencies and the ways in which alliances impact on the UN’s day-to-day operations. The second part of the course will focus on an assigned country (for each Model UN, each college is assigned a country to represent. It will entail a study of the country’s history, politics and economics and will conclude with the writing of ‘position papers’ that reflect that country’s approach to issues confronting the UN. In addition, there will be a public speaking component. Students taking the course will have the opportunity to participate in a Model United Nations. Students wishing to enroll should e-mail jbecker@bard.edu with 1-2 paragraphs indicating why they would like to participate. Class size: 15

 

91692

PS 243   Public Intellectuals in the Age

of the Internet

Walter Mead

. . W . F

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 309

SSCI

In the age of the Internet, public intellectuals and journalists must adapt to shorter news cycles, short attention spans, new economic models and a flood of competing commentary and information. Increasingly for young journalists and emerging public intellectuals, blogging is a “threshold skill” that opens the door to entry level jobs and launches careers. This course will analyze contemporary and historical short form political writing and teach students how to write professional quality blog posts.  Class size: 12

 

91693

PS 249   War, Sovereignty, and the

Subject of International Politics

Christopher McIntosh

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

HEG 201

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights  How is war different from other forms of political violence? What does it mean to identify a particular act of violence as a "war" rather than a civil conflict, terrorism, or genocide?  In what ways do our conceptions of state sovereignty shape our understanding of the concept of war?  In other words, what makes a "war", a "war"?  In this course we will explore the conceptions of war that orient international politics and inform the practice of international relations.  Initially we will focus on the configurations of power that animate the state, as well as the underlying ideas that inform international politics and its theory.  In the second half of the course, we will examine how these conceptions of war operate in practice by examining contemporary foreign policy issues such as the US war on terror/Al Qaeda, humanitarian interventions, and the US (in)action in Darfur.  By the end of the course we will have a deeper appreciation for how theories of international politics—even those considered some of the most abstract—directly relate to and inform the practices and policies of state and nonstate actors.  Class size: 20

 

91932

PS 289   International Relations in the

Middle East and North Africa

James Ketterer

. T . Th .

1:30 - 2:50 pm

OLIN 307

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies, Middle Eastern Studies  The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) continues to be a site of conflict generating media attention and dramatic headlines. Beyond the headlines, however, there are developing trends, emerging actors and competing explanations that are often overlooked.  This course examines the international politics in MENA using the theoretical tools of international relations. Major themes include the nature of the state system in the MENA and its creation; the causes of conflict within the region; the roles played by outside powers; and the causes and effects of transnational forces such as Arab nationalism, Islamic radicalism, criminal networks, media and global economic actors.  The course will also explore the nature of sub-state and sectarian identities and the effects on regional politics (ie, Sunni vs Shi’i Islam, Kurds, Amazigh. These themes are explored in the context of several case studies, including, but not limited to, the Algerian civil war in the 1990s, the wars in Iraq, the revolution in Libya, and the ongoing crisis in Syria. The course will offer students a better understanding of the international politics of the MENA and will help students appreciate the competing pressures on policymakers as the region changes in rapid and complex ways.    The course will also highlight ways in which international relations theory can be applied to real-world situations.  Class size: 15

 

91699

PS 334   Politics of Globalization

Sanjib Baruah

. T . . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 305

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights, Sociology   At least until the financial crisis of 2008 it was common for advocates of free markets to argue that globalization is a positive force that can generate employment and raise the world’s living standards. Critics on the left however, argue that the transformations captured by the term globalization are best seen as a phase in the history of capitalist development. Phrases like late capitalism, neo-liberalism and flexible accumulation are key terms in this understanding of globalization. The narrative of globalization, especially the oft-repeated idea that there is no alternative to neo-liberal globalization, according to these writers, is little more than an ideological project that seeks to “naturalize capitalism.” The course will consider these arguments and read texts by authors including Arjun Appadurai, Eric Cazdyn, James Ferguson, Thomas Friedman, David Harvey, Karl Polanyi, Saskia Sassen, Joseph Stiglitz, Imre Szeman and Karl Marx. The course is meant as an Upper College seminar and will be partly driven by student interest. Research papers and class presentations are among the requirements. Class size: 15

 

91695

PS 354   Anglo-American Grand Strategy

Walter Mead

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 306

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies The American world system that exists today can be seen as version 2.0 of the liberal capitalist world system first built by Great Britain.  Both the British and the American builders of these systems developed a distinct style of strategic thought around the needs of a maritime, global and commercial system.  Students will read works by important thinkers in this strategic tradition like Admiral Mahan and Winston Churchill; they will also study the grand strategies of these powers in the series of wars from the War of the Spanish Succession through the Cold War and analyze contemporary American policy in the light of the three centuries of Anglophone world power. Class size: 15

 

91698

PS 363   Ethics & International Affairs

Christopher McIntosh

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

HEG 300

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights  Current debates in US foreign policy have centered on questions surrounding drone strikes, civilian casualties, the targeted killing of Americans, and humanitarian intervention with advocates on both sides of these issues citing moral and ethical justifications for their respective positions.  Each of these debates beg a central question—what does it mean to be ethical in international politics? To whom are we responsible? Do ethical concerns cross borders? What does it mean to be ethical in an arena defined by the modern sovereign state? This class will explore the underlying issues and tensions informing these questions by engaging the theoretical traditions and larger ethical conflicts underlying these policy questions.  Theories/issues to be covered include cosmopolitanism, just war, and post-structural approaches to international obligation.   After working through the larger questions theoretically, we will examine and apply these to contemporary debates surrounding intervention, terrorism, targeted killing, and torture.  Class size: 15

 

91696

PS 368   Promoting Democracy Abroad

Omar Encarnacion

. T . . .

3:10 – 5:30 pm

OLIN 303

SSCI

Cross-listed:  American Studies, Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights   Almost alone among the world’s superpowers, the United States has made promoting democracy abroad a central objective of its foreign policy.  The origins of what has been called “America’s Mission” runs from the very birth of the American state in 1776, when the founding fathers declared the United States to be an exemplar state to guide the political development of other nations, to the ongoing attempt by the George W. Bush administration to give Iraq a democratic makeover.  This course explores three core questions about America’s attempts to promote democracy abroad.  What explains the genesis and persistence of the centrality of democracy in American foreign policy?  How have American administrations endeavored to construct policies to advance democratic development abroad?  And why have American attempts on behalf of the promotion of democracy abroad so often fallen short of their intended goal of creating stable democratic states, a point underscored by the American experience in Iraq. Readings will include Abraham Lowenthal, ed., Exporting Democracy: The United States and Latin America; Tony Smith, America’s Mission: The United States and the Global Struggle for Democracy in the Twentieth Century; Thomas Carothers, Aiding Democracy Abroad: The Learning Curve; Walter Russell Mead, Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How it Changed the World; and Larry Diamond, Squandered Victory: The American Occupation and the Bungled Effort to Bring Democracy to Iraq.   Class size: 15

 

91687

PS 420   Hannah Arendt Seminar:

 The Educated Citizen

Roger Berkowitz

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

ARENDT CNTR

HUM

Cross-listed:  Human Rights, Philosophy  This course is dedicated to reading some of Hannah Arendt's seminal works with a particular focus on her thinking about citizenship and thinking as these two activities relate to the human condition. We will read carefully Arendt’s The Human Condition, The Crisis in Education, Reflections on Little Rock and other essays. In addition, we will read from authors like Richard Rodriguez and Matthew Crawford who will be speaking at the Annual Arendt Center Conference on “The Educated Citizen.” In addition to Bard undergraduates, the participants will include visiting fellows from the Hannah Arendt Center for Ethical and Political Thinking. The course is also open to select students from the Center for Curatorial Studies (CCS). Beyond scheduled class meetings, students are expected to attend lectures and other events sponsored by the Arendt Center and CCS. Class size: 10