By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

 

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credit may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

 

91739

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Geoffrey McDonald

M . . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held for new members on Monday, Sept. 9th 6:30-10:00 at the Fisher Center. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7091. * The first Orchestra rehearsal will be on September 16 from 7:30 pm -10:30 pm in the Fisher Center.* (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.) Class size: 30

 

91382

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 – 10:00 pm

OLIN HALL

PART

First rehearsal will be on Tuesday September 10th, 2013.  Class size: 35

 

91740

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

TBA

 

.

PART

Class size: 20

 

91381

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40 – 6:40 pm

BITO HALL

PART

2 credits. Auditions will be held by appointment for new members.  Class size: 30

 

91384

MUS 108F   Ensemble:Jazz

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

91398

MUS 108G   Ensemble: Cello

Garfield Moore

. . . . F

5:00 – 7:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

Cass size: 12

 

91743

MUS 108G2   Chamber Ensemble of any Instrument

Patricia Spencer

. T . . .

7:30 -9:30 pm

BDH

PART

The large variety of works written “for any instruments” invites exploration of atypical groupings – flute, marimba and tuba have been known to project wonderful blends.  This repertoire often requires a high degree of responsibility on the part of the performer: not only choosing dynamics and tempos but also instrumentation of various phrases and sometimes overall structure.  Members of this ensemble will engage in musical thinking outside the bounds of “normal” chamber music, and will discover how (or if) that may open a new dimension in their approach to more conventional performance.  Class size: 20

 

91741

MUS 108H   Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Richard Davis

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

TBA

PART

Class size: 22

 

92149

MUS 108I   Electro-Acoustic Ensemble

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W . .

1:30 -3:30 pm

BLM HALL

PART

Class size: 14

 

91742

MUS 108J   Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

91397

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:40 – 6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 15

 

91719

MUS 108P   Ensemble: Baroque

Alexander Bonus

TBA . . .

TBA

BLM 117

PART

Performance ensemble focusing on music from 1600-1750. Requires an audition for acceptance.  Class size: 14 

 

91838

MUS / DAN 130  The Body on Stage: Movement  for the Performer

Jean Churchill

. . . Th .

10:30 – 12:30 pm

CAMPUS MPR

PART

See Dance section for description.

 

 

MUSIC COURSES

 

91423

MUS 169   Listening to String Quartets,

Haydn through Shostakovich

Marka Gustavsson

. T . Th .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

OLIN 104

AART

Many composers of string quartets reserved that particular genre for their most profound and unusual utterances. We will listen to the expressive, conversational music in this form, from its roots in the classical First Viennese School, through German Romanticism, European Nationalism, the Second Viennese School, up to and including American and European Modernism. In addition to developing tools for listening to this complex polyphonic texture, through classroom experience with recordings, and attending concerts, we will read composers’ letters such as Beethoven’s Heiligenstadt testament, as well as articles from current publications including such authors as Alex Ross, Kyle Gann, Christopher Gibbs, and Richard Taruskin. Assignments will include two papers (5 pages), one concert review, informal writing in class, and a final project. Knowledge of music notation is not required. Class size: 20

 

91391

MUS 171   Jazz Harmony

John Esposito

M . W . .

9:40 – 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies Introduces the basic harmonic structures that are components of the Blues and the Tin Pan Alley songs that modern Jazz musicians used as vehicles for improvisation. Basic keyboard skills are learned including transposition. The semester includes a short historical survey of Blues and of Jazz from Ragtime to the Swing era as part of the effort to understand the practice of the technical/aesthetic fundamentals specific to Jazz as a 20th century African-American music including an introduction to the contribution of female musicians to the Jazz legacy. There is an ear-training component to this course. The melodic component includes singing the basic 20th century harmonic materials, Blues melodies and transcriptions of solos by Jazz masters. It includes the practice of the syncopated rhythmic language underlying linear melodic phrasing. The harmonic work includes singing the basic 20th century harmonic materials, Blues melodies and transcriptions of solos by Jazz masters. This course fulfills a music theory/performance requirement for music majors. Required course for moderating into the Jazz program.  Class size: 40

 

91383

MUS 183   High/Low: Tensions & Agreements

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

As far back as the early Renaissance, distinctions were made as to what constituted popular and serious music.  In the 15th century some of those distinctions were defined by the music’s relationship to the church.  Later, in the 18th and 19th centuries, idiomatic folk music began to be deliberately used in opera and symphonic repertoire to evoke elements of nationalism and “local color.”  In the 20 and 21st centuries, characteristics of jazz, folk, and rock music intermingled, and now some earlier distinctions between popular and serious music are being blurred.  In this course, key works in Western classical music from the 16th through the 21st centuries will be studied along with the popular music of the day (when available).  Careful attention will be paid to critical reaction to these works, along with an examination of the cultural climate and trends that might have contributed to high/low distinctions.  Works to be studied will include: Josquin, Missa L’homme arme, Handel, Messiah, Haydn, Symphony No. 104, excerpts from Berlioz’s Les Troyens, Ravel, L’enfant et le sortilege, and excerpts from Philip Glass’s Einstein on the Beach, and John Adam’s Nixon in China.  Music of Louis Armstrong, George Gershwin, Miles Davis, The Velvet Underground, The Beatles, and Sonic Youth, among others, will be examined.  Evaluation will be based on two exams, four short papers, and a term paper.  This course counts toward music history credit. Class size: 20

 

91983

MUS 185   Introduction to Ethnomusicology

Andrew Eisenberg

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BITO 210

AART

Cross-listed: Anthropology   Ethnomusicology encompasses the study of music-making throughout the world, from the distant past to the present. Ethnomusicologists examine music as central to human experience throughout space and time, and explore its profound relationship to cognition, emotion, language, dance, visual arts, spiritual belief, social organization, collective identity, politics, economics, and the physical body. Students will study the performing arts as culture. This course will introduce students to the history, theories, and methodologies of the field of ethnomusicology through weekly readings and multi-media. It will also be a project-based seminar, driven by student’s individual ethnographic projects and themes. Class size: 20

 

91388

MUS 201   Music Theory I

Alexander Bonus /

Erika Switzer

M T W Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N217

PART

This course serves as an introduction to music theory and music making, and is the entry-level course to the classical theory sequence. Basics of musical notation will be the starting point, after which we will move quickly to scales and recognition of triads and seventh chords, as well as rhythmic performance. At all times the course will emphasize analysis of real music, and an ear-training component will reinforce the theoretical knowledge with practical experience. There are no prerequisites; the course serves as prerequisite for Music Theory II and all high-level theory courses. This fulfills theory requirements.  Class size: 20

 

91420

MUS 210   The Roaring Twenties: Music and Society in Europe and the US in the years after World War I

Peter Laki

M . W . .

10:10 -11:30 am

BLM N217

AART

This course will explore the music of the 1920s in New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna and Petrograd/Leningrad.  The emphasis will be placed on the relationships between composers and other artists and musical institutions in their historical and social context.  Among the issues explored will be the meaning of the term “avant-garde,” as well as interactions between various Western and non-Western art-forms.  No technical knowledge of music is necessary.  Among the composers studied will be Gershwin, Copland, Stravinsky, Milhaud, Weill, Schoenberg, Berg, and Shostakovich.  There will be an eclectic reading list, as well as some film screenings in the evening that will require attendance two or three times during the semester.  Students will write one term paper whose contents they will also present in class; in addition, there will be a mid-term quiz and a final exam.  This course can be cross-listed in the History program and advertised in the Arts and Lang&Lit Divisions.  It will count towards the music history requirement for music majors and Conservatory students.  Class size: 20

 

91831

MUS 212   Jazz in Literature II

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:10 – 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies We will study the words of Gary Gidden “Visions in Jazz” and Robert Gottlieb from his book entitled “Reading Jazz” in order to bring attention to some important literature on Jazz. Some of the writers look beyond Jazz as an art form, but also bring attention to the historical influence on culture, race, tradition and our social experience.  Writers like Albert Murry, Ralph Ellison, Eudora Welty. There is an attempt in their works to illuminate the significance of the musical potential the musicians inherit and the creative option they exercise.  This course includes the words of many who have been hailed as Jazz Greatest Musicians.  This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 18

 

91979

MUS 253   Special Topics in

Ethnomusicology: Black Music & African Retention Theories

Andrew Eisenberg

M . W . .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

BLM N210

AART

This course explores scholarly and popular debates over the nature of “black music” in the U.S., focusing on the development of questions and theories of African retentions from the 1920s to the present. It is at once an introduction to the concept of black music, a survey of African American musical traditions from the slave songs to hip hop, and a review of the history of debates over music and race in U.S. academia and public culture. Students will be asked to read critically and respond to a diverse set of readings from literary criticism, anthropology, musicology, and ethnomusicology, and to engage in analytical listening. Class size: 20

 

91751

MUS 254A   Pronunciation and Diction

for Singers I

Erika Switzer

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BDH

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature. The fall semester will be devoted to the English and Italian languages, the spring to German and French. Through song literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language. No previous knowledge of the languages is required. Class size: 12

 

91753

MUS 256   Orchestration Workshop

George Tsontakis

. T . . .

3:10 -5:30 pm

BLM N217

PART

Students will learn how to score for instrumental combinations beginning with small ensembles up to full orchestra. There will be live demonstrations of orchestral instruments, listening and score study of orchestral literature, chord voicing and notation of bowings, breathing, articulations, and special orchestral effects as well as practice of basic conducting patterns and skills. Prerequisites:  Fundamentals of Music and composition workshop. There will be a reading of the orchestrations by the Bard College Orchestra.  Class size: 7

 

91752

MUS 265B   Literature and Language

of Music III: 20th & 21st Centuries

Kyle Gann

. . W . F

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

Around 1910 musicians began abandoning the rules of harmony and counterpoint that had guided music’s course for more than three centuries, leaving every composer free to imagine and develop his or her own musical system or language. This course will attempt to bring order to the resulting chaotic history of classical and postclassical music since 1910. We will focus on the era through the lenses of movements – fauvism, dodecaphony, serialism, neoclassicism, neoromanticism, minimalism, totalism, postmodernism – and major figures, as well as the changing relation to (and often reaction against) capitalism. As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected. Grades will be based on papers, classroom and Moodle discussion, and two listening tests. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. Literature and Language I and II courses are not prerequisites. Class size: 22.

 

91754

MUS 266A   American Popular Song 1900-1929

John Esposito

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N211

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies - This performance-based course is a survey of the major American popular song composers of the Tin Pan Alley era, whose work forms the core of the  Jazz repertoire. Composers studied will include Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Walter Donaldson, Vincent Youmans, Richard Whiting, Henderson/Da Silva/ Brown and others. The course will include readings, recorded music, and films. The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony II or permission of the instructor. This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

91747

MUS 273   From Hungary to the World:

Contributions of Béla Bartók, György Ligeti & György Kurtág to 20th Century Music

Peter Laki

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART

Hungary, a Central European country smaller than New York State, has given the world more than its share of great composers and performers.  Paradoxically, Béla Bartók and Zoltán Kodály, the two great Hungarian composers of the first half of the 20th century, were able to make Hungarian music internationally relevant by making it more recognizably Hungarian.  It was partly to this end that they undertook their historic research and analysis of Hungarian folk music, which will be explored in the class.  Their successors in the second half of the century, György Ligeti and György Kurtág, built on this legacy in some fundamentally new ways, redefining the relationship between the local and the universal.  We will discuss the consequences of the fact that Bartók, Ligeti and Kurtág were all born in areas that now belong to Romania, not Hungary.  A strong musical background and proficiency in score reading are desirable.  There will be some reading assignments, but the emphasis will be on active, analytical listening.  Students will write one term paper whose contents they will also present in class; in addition, there will be a mid-term quiz and a final exam.  The course will count towards the music history requirement for music majors and Conservatory students. Class size: 20

 

91834

MUS 276   Introduction to Opera

Christopher Gibbs

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course surveys the history of opera from Monteverdi at the beginning of the seventeenth century to recent developments in performance art and musical theater.  The focus will be on a limited number of operas, including treatments of the Orpheus myth by Monteverdi and Gluck, Handel’s Giulio Cesare, Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Beethoven’s Fidelio,Wagner’s Die Walkure, Verdi’s La traviata, Berg’s Wozzeck, and Glass’s Satyagraha.  As many of the works to be examined have significant literary and dramatic sources, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which extraordinary works of the written and spoken word are transformed into compelling musical theater.  Classes will also include video screenings and comparisons of different productions.  It is not expected or required that students be able to read musical notation.  There will be quizzes, performance reviews, as well as brief writing assignments.  This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.   Class size: 20

 

91746

MUS 302   Advanced Analysis Seminar: Minimalism

Kyle Gann

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

The focus of this semester’s seminar will be minimalist and minimalist-influenced music. Minimalism was a musical style that reintroduced simplicity, drones, and repetition into music in the 1960s, but its methods are not always as simple as they sound, and some of the formal structures it introduced have become important paradigms for postmodern music, particularly in expanding the listening frame beyond the scale of normal concert performance. Tracing the historical developments of the movement, we’ll analyze La Monte Young’s The Well-Tuned Piano, a six-hour improvisatory piano work in altered tuning; Steve Reich’s popular Music for 18 Musicians; Philip Glass’s Einstein on the Beach; Tom Johnson’s An Hour for Piano; John Adams’s Phrygian Gates; and also postminimalist works by William Duckworth, Lois Vierk, Paul Epstein, Peter Garland, and others. Work will consist of weekly score analyses and a final analysis paper. Prerequisite: any 200-level theory course or permission of the instructor. Open only to moderated upper college students.  Class size: 15

 

91387

MUS 320   Musical Electronics: Analog Synthesis and Processing

Robert Bielecki

. T . . .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course concentrates on the creative use of electronic circuitry and the construction of devices for musical applications.  Students will develop an understanding of how basic electronic components are used in audio circuits and how to read schematic diagrams. We’ll discuss topics such as Voltage Control, Synthesis, Filtering, Waveshaping, Phase Shifting, Ring Modulation, Theremins, Circuit Bending, etc. We’ll work from existing designs and also create new devices as we hone our skills of soldering, point-to-point wiring and layout.   Familiarity with basic electronics and the use of hand tools is helpful but not a prerequisite for this class.  Enrollment limited.  Open only to moderated upper college students. Class size: 12

 

91835

HUM 332   Performing Arendt

Robert Woodruff

M . . . .

. . W . .

3:00 -6:00 pm

11:50 -1:20 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

See Theater section for description.

 

91833

MUS 349   Jazz: The Freedom Principle IV

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies  This Jazz History course which is part four of a four part course.  Part four is a study of Jazz after 1952 to the early 70’s.  The course will examine the extreme shifts in jazz styles from Cool, to Hard bop to the Arvant Garde.  Emphasis will be on musicians associated with these styles such as Stan Getz, Lee Konitz, Horace Silver, Hank Mobley, Anthony Braxton and Muhal Richard Abrams.  The course will discuss the solo and combo styles of these musicians.  The course employs a cultural approach designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music from 1952- 1972 and examine it’s effect on the music.  This will be illustrated with recordings and films.  The class requires oral presentation and critical listening.  This course is for juniors and seniors who have moderated into music.  This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

91750

MUS 348   Behind Open Doors: Vocal Works  of Benjamin Britten and Francis Poulenc

Rufus Muller /

Erika Switzer

M . . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BDH

AART

2013 marks the 50th anniversary of Francis Poulenc’s death and the 100th anniversary of Benjamin Britten’s birth.  These two composers shared biographical similarities – notably their close work with singer-partner-muses Pierre Bernac and Peter Pears.  The fruit of their inspired partnerships reveals a deep understanding of vocalism and expression evidenced in a rich body of song.  This course will introduce students to the lives and vocal works of Britten and Poulenc through assigned readings, written assignments, guided discussions, listening, musical study, and performance.  Recommended for vocal and piano majors as well as budding musicologists.  Limited to Upper College Students.  Class size: 12

 

91748

MUS 352   Electronic, Acoustic, Computer Music Composition I

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing, original work in the form of recordings, scores, and/or digital realizations. These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members. Installation and inter-media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Lucier, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This fulfills music theory requirement.  Class size: 15

 

91749

MUS 365   The Music of Japan

Richard Teitelbaum

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies  The course begins with an examination of the ancient repertories of Buddhist chant (shomyo) and court music (gagaku) that form the basis for traditional Japanese classical music. Other traditional genres to be studied will include the Zen-inspired shakuhachi (end-blown bamboo flute) honkyoku, and music for biwa (lute), shamisen and koto. After exploring the impact of Western music on Japan in the 19thand 20th centuries, the class will focus on the combination of traditional Japanese instruments and forms with Western contemporary classical techniques, as exemplified by the path breaking work of Toru Takemitsu, as well as that of Yuji Takahashi, Toshi Ichiyanagi, and others. Postwar experimental groups, such as  Gutai, Group Ongaku, etc. that include such key figures as Yoko Ono, Takehisa Kosugi, and other Fluxus members will be examined, as well as Japanese Free Jazz musicians such as Masayuki Takayanagi, Masahiko Togashi, and Toshinori Kondo. Finally, recent developments in “noise” music by such figures as  MerzbowOtomo Yoshihide, Toshimaru Nakamura, Sachiko M  and others that combine turntables, no input mixers and laptops with Japanese and western acoustic instruments will be studied.  Class size: 15

 

91937

MUS 366C   Advanced Contemporary

Jazz Techniques III

John Esposito

. . . Th .

11:50 – 2:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies  This course will focus on strategies for improvisation without predetermined chord structures or rhythmic frameworks and on methods for shaping performances spontaneously.  We will also explore collaboration with artists from other disciplines such as dance, spoken word and visual arts. This class is open to moderated upper college students who have successfully completed advanced contemporary Jazz techniques A & B. Class size: 15

 

91395

MUS 367A   Jazz Composition I

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class acts as an introduction to jazz composition, covering first practical aspects of notation, instrumentation, Sibelius/Finale and score/parts preparation that will be necessary for the remainder of the two-year sequence. The focus of the first semester is on the less structured realm of modal harmony. Students compose and have their piece performed in class on a weekly basis allowing them to begin to find their own voice and to master the practical techniques necessary for a successful performance of their work. This fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.  Open to moderated students and students who are preparing for their moderation into the music program. Class size: 12

 

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS:

Workshops carry 2 credits, unless otherwise noted.

 

91757

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

3:00 -5:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's musical soul onto the page, pass that music to players in the class (as well as some conservatory players when needed). They will later be recorded by the professional group, the Da Capo Chamber Players, who give a concert of some of that music at the end of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Open to serious first-year students who can read music and play an instrument. Interested students should email Prof. Tower (tower@bard.edu) prior to registration to determine eligibility.  Class size: 18

 

91759

MUS WKSHB   Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart / Michael Bukhman

. T . Th .

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

4:00 -6:30 pm

BLM HALL

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students choose one of the three sessions.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration. Class size: 18

 

91390

MUS WKSHD   Sight Reading Workshop

Michael DeMicco

. T . . .

12:00 -1:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills.  Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake

book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C

(concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well.  Class size: 14

 

91761

MUS WKSHF   Samba School

Carlos Valdez

. . . . F

. . . . F

12:00 -2:00 pm

2:00 -4:00 pm

BLM N211

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  Samba School provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggae).  All skill levels welcome, Advanced students will register for the 12:00 – 2:00 slot, Beginners in 2:00-4:00. Class size: 60

 

91758

MUS WKSHJ   New Music/New Music Performance

Blair McMillen

. T . . .

6:30 -8:30 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This class will explore a wide variety of 20th and 21st-century music through live performances, discussions, listening assignments, and talks by visiting or faculty artists.  A stylistically omnivorous class, we will study and work on: conventionally-notated scores, popular music, the recent “alt-classical” movement, improvisatory works and graphic scores, electro-acoustic music, and much else.  Students will rehearse on their own in smaller combinations outside of class, and will be encouraged to perform regularly.  There will be an end-of-semester concert.   Open to instrumentalists, singers, and composers from both the Conservatory and the Music Program.  Class size: 18

 

91760

MUS WKSHL   Opera Workshop

Rufus Muller /

Ilka LoMonaco /

Teresa Buchholz

. . W . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Opera Workshop:  In the Fall Semester, we prepare a themed program of operatic excerpts (choruses, ensembles, solos), which is then performed in the Fisher Center, fully staged and with orchestra,  in the early part of the Spring Semester. Typically this involves intensive rehearsals during the week before Spring Semester, and evening rehearsals in the first week of semester. Students enrolling in the Fall Semester for two credits thus commit themselves to the final rehearsals and performances in the Spring Semester, which earn them an additional two credits.  Enrollment is by audition. Please contact Professors Müller (rumu2000@earthlink.net) and LoMonaco (ilka98@aol.com) for details. Class size: 18

 

91756

MUS WKSHN   "Hands-on" Music History

Patricia Spencer /

Peter Laki

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits Members of this class will explore our musical past by playing it!  Also improving sight reading, the course will cover a sampling of chamber music from different eras.  Members will build familiarity with a wide variety of harmonies and musical styles (mostly European) from the Renaissance through the present.  Background readings and class discussion about the composers will provide historical context for the works being played. Parts and scores will be provided one week in advance for those who prefer to prepare their sight-reading.  Composers may include but are not limited to: Gesualdo, Machaut, di Lasso, Monteverdi, Purcell, Frederick the Great, J.S. Bach and his sons, Vivaldi, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Dvorak, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Ravel, Copland, Cage, Carter, Rzewski and many more.  Works will not be rehearsed to a performance level, but may occasionally be repeated.   Class size: 20

 

91396

MUS WKSP3   Jazz Improvisation I

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40 – 7:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits This class serves as an introduction to jazz improvisation. It is intended for incoming jazz ensemble players who would like to develop as improvisers, or classical players who would like to explore improvisational techniques in a jazz framework.  Class size: 15

 

91425

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

Pamela Pentony

M . . . .

4:00 – 7:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits  A performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance. How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo. Rhythmic and melodic alterations are explored.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements. Particular attention is paid to phrasing. The language of scat singing is explored, with emphasis on practice in every class. The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications are taken from The Great American Songbook. There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues. Jazz chorus meets separately. There is a final exam in this class. Class size: 30

 

91421

MUS WKSPX   Music Software for Composition and Performance

Miguel Frasconi

. . . Th .

1:30 – 3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

4 credits.   This class will explore popular software used in music today. The main focus will be on Ableton Live, both as a composing/performing tool and as a host for software instruments and audio plugins. Laptop synthesizers be explored as well as the use of hardware controllers and smart-phone devices. Through weekly assignments, students will learn how to integrate audio processing with acoustic instruments, use audio clips and re-sampling in an interactive environment, and mix finished compositions. Creative use of these techniques will be encouraged and the student's own work shared through weekly listening sessions and a final concert. Students should have their own copy of Ableton Live 9 (Intro or full version) or arrange regular  access to the department's computers. Students should already have a basic understanding of electronic music. Class size: 16

91929

MUS WKSH   Sonata Workshop

Blair McMillen/

Erica Kiesewetter/

Marka Gustavsson

. T. . .

4:00 -6:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This workshop will explore the wide repertoire of sonatas with instrument and piano, as coached by the professors. Students may sign up as a pre-formed group or be placed. Open to college and conservatory students by recommendation or audition.

91934

MUS WKSH   Mixed Trios, Quartets, & Quintets

Patricia Spencer

. TBA . .

 

 

PART

 

 

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS:  Special Projects are designed for music majors only to pursue individual or group projects with a particular Professor.

 

91769

MUS PROJ CG  Special Projects

Christopher Gibbs

. . . . .

 

.

PART

91763

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

. . . . .

 

.

PART

91768

MUS PROJ ES  Special Projects

Erika Switzer

. . . . .

 

.

PART

91762

MUS PROJ JB  Special Projects

James Bagwell

. . . . .

 

.

PART

91766

MUS PROJ JT  Special Projects

Joan Tower

. . . . .

 

.

PART

91765

MUS PROJ KG  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

. . . . .

 

.

PART

91764

MUS PROJ LGR  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

91770

MUS PROJ PL  Special Projects

Peter Laki

. . . . .

 

.

PART

91767

MUS PROJ TB  Special Projects

Thurman Barker

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

 

PRIVATE LESSONS

 

Please Note: There is a $150.00 Private Lesson Fee each semester for any student taking private lessons.  If a student decides to drop private lessons they must fill out a Drop/Add form, have it signed by the appropriate department faculty and deliver it to the Office of the Registrar on or before Wednesday, September 18th, 2013, 5 PM or they will be charged and responsible for the $150.00 Department Fee. Students who opt to take lessons not-for-credit will be responsible for the full cost of the lessons themselves.  Not available for on-line registration. Please note: you can audit an ensemble, but you cannot audit lessons. Private Lessons are offered as follows:

 

      David Arner - piano (jazz, classical and improvisation)

      Teresa Buchholz – classical voice

      Michael Bukhman – classical piano

      Ira Coleman - jazz bass

      Kenny Davis - jazz bass

      Mike DiMicco - jazz guitar

      Greg Dinger - classical guitar 

      Daniel Fishkin -  Serge modular synthesizer

      James Fitzwilliam - coach and accompanist

      Laura Flax - clarinet

      Miguel Frasconi - electronic music

      Otto (Richard) Gardner - bass

      Greg Glassman - jazz trumpet

      Marka Gustavsson – violin, viola

      Stephen Hammer - oboe and recorder

      Ryan Kamm - classical bass

      Erica Kiesewetter – violin

      Ilka LoMonaco- classical voice

      Laura Majestic – harp

      Blair McMillen - piano

      Garfield Moore – cello

      Rufus Müller – classical voice

      Peter O'Brien - jazz drums

      Sakiko Ohashi - piano

      Pamela Pentony - voice (jazz)

      Elisabeth Romano - bassoon

      Pat Spencer - flute

      John Thomas, trumpet

      Carlos Valdez - Latin jazz percussion

      Alexander Waterman - cello

      Bruce Williams - jazz and classical saxophone