91807

FILM 106   Intro to Documentary Media

Ed Halter

             Screening:

. . . Th .

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 - 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AART

An introductory historical survey of the documentary, from the silent era to the digital age. Topics addressed will include the origins of the concept of the documentary, direct cinema and cinema verite, propaganda, ethnographic media, the essay film, experimental documentary forms, media activism, fiction and documentary, and the role of changing technologies. Filmmakers studied will include Flaherty, Vertov, Riefenstahl, Rouch, Pennebaker, Maysles, Wiseman, Marker, Farocki, Spheeris, Hara, Riggs,Honigman, Morris, and Moore. Grades will be based on exams, essays and other research and writing projects. Open to all students, registration priority for First-Year students and film majors.   Class size: 25

 

91376

FILM 113   History of Cinema:

Silent Era

John Pruitt

             Screening:

. . W . .

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 - 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AART

A lecture survey course that traces the medium of film as an art form from its origins to the end of the silent era. An emphasis will be placed on particularly prominent "schools" of filmmaking: The American Silent Comedy, German Expressionism, The Soviet and European Avant-gardes. The long list of film artists to be screened and studied include: the Lumiere Brothers, George Melies, D.W. Griffith, Lois Weber, Germaine Dulac, Sergei Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Yasujiro Ozu, Carl Dreyer, Fernand Leger, Luis Bunuel, Man Ray, Erich von Stroheim, F. W. Murnau, Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. Readings will consist mostly of classic aesthetic studies from the era itself, those by Eisenstein, Vertov, Munsterberg, Arnheim, et al. Course is limited to First-Year students only and is highly recommended for (but not restricted to) those students who are contemplating film as a major course of study. Two essay exams and a term paper.  Class size: 30

 

91378

FILM 205   Gesture, Light and Motion

Kelly Reichardt

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PART

A filmmaking workshop introducing the student to the narrative form through the qualities of gesture, light and motion on screen. Focusing on these elements above dialogue and literary approaches to storytelling, allows the filmmaker to develop expressive control  to communicate a deep sense of character.  Approaches to visual storytelling, examination of narrative strategies, hands-on shooting, and solutions of practical and/or aesthetic problems, as they are encountered in the making of a film. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement. Class size: 12

 

91369

FILM 207 A  Intro to Video Production

Jacqueline Goss

                 Screening:

. T . . .

. . . Th .

10:10 - 1:10 pm

5:00 – 7:00 pm

AVERY 333

AVERY 110

PART

This course is designed to introduce you to various elements of video production with an emphasis on video art and experimentation.  The class culminates with the completion of a single channel video piece by each student.  To facilitate this final project, there will be a number of camera and editing assignments that are designed to familiarize you with digital video technology while investigating various aesthetic and theoretical concepts. Class sessions will consist of technology demonstrations, screenings, critiques and discussions. Technology training will include: cameras, Final Cut Pro, studio lighting and lighting for green screen, key effects, microphones and more. No prerequisites, permission from instructor. This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

91371

FILM 207 B  Intro to Video Production

Ben Coonley

                 Screening:

. . W . .

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

5:00 – 7:00 pm

AVERY 117

AVERY 110

PART

See above.  Class size: 12

 

91368

FILM 208   16mm Film Workshop

Peggy Ahwesh

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PART

An introduction to filmmaking with a strong emphasis on mastering the 16mm Bolex camera. Students will be required to shoot six different assignments designed to address basic experimental, documentary, and narrative techniques. A wide range of technical and aesthetic issues will be explored in conjunction with editing, lighting, and sound recording techniques. No prerequisites, permission from instructor.  This production class fulfills a moderation requirement.  Class size: 12

 

91857

FILM 212   Women’s Experimental Cinema

Ed Halter

            Screening:

. . . . F

. . . Th .

10:10 – 1:10 pm

7:00 – 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies  A critical analysis of experimental film and video produced by women, from the 1920s to today. Artists studied will include Akerman, Cha, Rainer, Menken, Friedrich, Wieland, Rosler, Thornton, Subrin, Colburn and Benning, among others. The course will investigate  the question of female consciousness and feminine aesthetics, the role of the woman artist, the impact of feminism on filmmaking and the arts, female representation and the gaze, women and technology, queer and post-colonial identity, and gender performance. Grades will be based on participation in discussion as well as a series of short writing assignments.  Class size: 25

 

91808

FILM 221   Found Footage, Appropriation

and Pranks

Ben Coonley

. . . . F

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 217

PART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities  This course surveys the history of appropriation in experimental media from the found footage, cut-up and collage films of the 1950's through the Lettrists and Situationists and up to current artistic and activist production efforts such as culture jamming, game hacking, sampling, hoaxing, resistance, interference and tactical media intervention.  The spectrum of traditions which involve the strategic  recontextualizing of educational, industrial and broadcast sources, projects that detourn official 'given' meaning, re-editing of outtakes, recycling of detritus, and a variety of works of piracy and parody which skew/subvert media codes will be examined for their contribution to the field.  Issues regarding gender, identity, media and net politics, technology, copyright and aesthetics will be addressed as raised by the work.  Students are required to produce their own work in video, gaming, installation, collage and/or audio through a series of assignments and a final project.  Class size: 12

 

91370

FILM 233   Art & Internet

Ben Coonley

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 333

PART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities; Science, Technology & Society   This production course considers the Internet as a source of creative material, an exhibition context, and begetter of new art forms. With reference to electronic media history and theory, we survey the contemporary landscape of online media production. Topics covered include: the origins of “net.art,” hypertext narratives, social networks, surf clubs and group blogging, web video, machinima, hacktivism, online games, online performance, digital readymade and assemblage art, among others. Students complete independent and collaborative creative projects designed to respond to and engage with Internet technologies and online networks. No special expertise with computers is required, but all work for the seminar will be produced using the digital media we study.  Class size: 12

 

92063

FILM 235   Video Installation

Glen Fogel

. . . Th .

10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 333

PART

This production course investigates video installation as an evolving contemporary art form that extends the conversation of video art beyond the frame and into live, hybrid media, site-specific, and multiple channel environments. Presentations, screenings, and readings augment critical thinking about temporal and spatial relationships, narrative structure, viewer perception and the challenges of presenting time-based work in a gallery or museum setting. Workshops hone technical skills and problem solving. Students develop research interests and apply their unique skills sets to short turnaround exercises and more expanded self-directed projects for gallery and non-theatrical contexts. Class size: 12

 

91374

FILM 256   Writing the Film

So Yong Kim

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PART

Cross-listed: Written Arts  An introductory writing course that looks at creative approaches to writing short films and dialogue scenes. There will be writing and research exercises, screenings, discussions, readings and script critiques. The course will focus on researching and developing ideas and structure for stories, building characters, poetic strategies and writing comedic, realistic and awkward romantic dialogue.  Class size: 12

 

91858

FILM 312   Advanced Screenwriting

Workshop

So Yong Kim

. T . . . .

10-:10 - 1:10 pm

AVERY 117

PART

An intensive workshop designed specifically for someone who plans to make a film for moderation or senior project. In a seminar setting, we will work on: script analysis, staging,  re-writes, and a shooting script.  The goal will be to develop a concise and polished script to become the basis for a short film.  
Pre-requisite: Film256 - Writing the Film or the successful completion of a sophomore level production class.  Non-majors must email the professor prior to registration for approval. Class size: 12

 

91835

HUM 332   Performing Arendt

Robert Woodruff

M . . . .

. . W . .

3:00 -6:00 pm

11:50 -1:20 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

See Theater section for description.

 

91377

FILM 339   Cinematic Naturalism in the

West and Its Literary Roots

John Pruitt

               Screening:

. T . . .

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 - 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

The seminar course will survey a number of major, highly influential films from the 1920's to the 1970's that bear a strong relationship to realism/naturalism: works by Griffith, Seastrom, Stroheim, Vidor, Kirsanoff, Renoir, Rossellini, deSica, Visconti, Olmi, Reisz, MacKenzie, Cassavetes, Loach, Burnett, et al.  In addition we will take the time to explore a selection of important literary works that will help us understand the complexity and depth of naturalism: George Eliot's Adam Bede, Emile Zola's Germinal, Thomas Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd, Theodor Dreiser's Sister Carrie, Maxim Gorky's The Lower Depths, Gerhart Hauptmann's The Weavers, Giovanni Verga'sI Malavoglia, Halldor Laxness's Independent People, and Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. There will be supplementary reading of key works of literary and cinematic criticism that pertain to the theory of art and realism. Writing assignments include a class journal and a twenty-page term paper. Juniors and Senior only.  Class size: 20

 

91379

FILM 344   Sound & Picture Editing

Kelly Reichardt

. . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

AVERY 217

PART

This course will explore the principles and practices of sound design in motion pictures. Through analysis of existing narrative sound works and through student's own sound creations, the class will explore the mutual influence of sound and picture. Over the semester, students will have the opportunity to deeply explore the editing process and discover how sound comes into play when making a cut.  In the first part of the semester, students will record and build layered tracks (ambient, foley, ADR) for sequences from existing films. In the second part of the semester, students will shoot their own footage to integrate with existing soundtracks. Students who wish to take the course should be familiar with the fundamentals of computer-based media and should be willing to share their work with others.  Class size: 12

 

91806

FILM 361   Experimental Ethnography

Jacqueline Goss

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 217

PART

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities; Human Rights  The definition of self in relation to others, the hermetic history of subcultures, the trouble with defining an "other," the pleasures and problems of intercultural encounters: these are a few themes found within a strain of experimental film and video that might be defined as experimental ethnographies. In this course, we will use the tools of media production (film, video, audio) and ethnography (observation, interview, immersion) to make work that may be defined as ethnographic; course participants may also use devices of fiction, performance, animation, or other approaches to produce films and videos.  Course time will also be devoted to discussing media screenings and related readings, including work by Jean Rouch, Raymond Birdwhistel, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Tracey Moffat, Peter Kubelka, Juan Downey, and HomiBhabha. Prerequisites:  Intro to Video or similar production course.  Class size: 12