91784

EUS 101   Introduction to Environmental & Urban Study

Kris Feder

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

HEG 204

SSCI

Humans have profoundly altered the character of Earth’s biosphere since the advent of agriculture and urbanization 10,000 years ago. This course explores how global problems such as climate disruption, species extinction, and depletion of fossil soils, fuels, and waters are interlinked with one another but also with social problems such as financial instability, widening economic inequality, food insecurity, intensifying conflict and militarization, and declining public health. We review the empirical evidence of major environmental problems; consider which academic disciplines and practical skills are required to tackle them; and contemplate alternative political options open to governments and communities.  Issues will be considered at a variety of scales—from the level of individual responsibility to the local, regional, national, and global dimensions. EUS 101 and 102 are the foundational courses of the EUS program and are required for moderation. No prerequisite.  Class size: 30

 

91905

EUS 210   The Global Future of Food 

Michael Specter

. . . . F

9:30 – 12:30 pm

OLIN 203

SSCI

Few issues cause more strident debate than those involving the way we grow our food.  In the United States, calories are plentiful and cheap– but with twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes those calories are killing us.  In many parts of the developing world, the opposite is true: more than a billion people go to bed hungry every night. And the gap is growing. How do we address these very different problems? Organic food has become something akin to a religion in many places, but by 2050, this planet will need to support three billion more people than it does today. That means producing, in the next thirty or so years, as much food as we have grown so far in all of human history. Is there any way to do that while shunning the use of sophisticated scientific tools – particularly genetically modified food? This course will examine one of our most fundamental problems: is it possible to overhaul our badly broken system of industrial agriculture, and feed the Earth’s rapidly growing population, while also growing safe, plentiful and nutritious food? Class size: 22

 

91904

EUS 220   The Dust Bowl: Lessons on How Not to Prepare for and Respond to Natural Perturbations 

Gidon Eshel

M . W. .

11:50 -1:10 pm

RKC 102

SSCI

The Dust Bowl―the prolonged, sustained and widespread drought that ravaged the southern Great Plains throughout the 1930s and early 1940s, and the blowing sand and soil that accompanied it―is arguably the single most devastating environmental catastrophe in U.S. history.  It emptied the Southern Plains of a full one third of their pre-drought population, turned one of the most rapidly expanding regions (in both population and economic activity) of the then still principally rural nation into sterile, deserted wasteland, and inflicted almost unimaginable physical and personal suffering on those who stayed. It is also a nearly perfect example of how a natural, entirely expected, human-impacting  phenomenon can be turned into the unmitigated regional catastrophe  that it was by ill-conceived human action. The Dust Bowl is thus a classic case study in human--environment interactions that holds invaluable lessons for the future. In this class, we will review, in mechanistic details, the physical (climatologcal, hydrological, agroecological, geomorphic) elements of the Dust Bowl, and place them in historic/economic context wherever appropriate.  Class size: 20

 

91797

EUS 305A   EUS Practicum: Urban Sanctuary: Gardens, Parks, and Nearby Nature

Thomas O’Dowd

. . . Th .

1:30 –  4:30 pm

OLIN 309

SSCI

Urban places can often be full of danger, garbage, and stress. In order to function happily and efficiently, people need places of escape, and they often find refuge in what little green space is available—gardens, parks, “abandoned” lots, or even the individual trees on their streets. This course will explore the practical implications of environmental psychology, a field that studies people and their relationship to the world around them, with a focus on personal and societal well-being. What impact do “green” spaces have on crime, school test scores, happiness, physical well-being, and a number of other seemingly unrelated social issues? How much (or how little) “nature” do we need to have an impact? How can we shape our environment to suit our cognitive needs? Students will investigate community, hospital, and meditation gardens; street trees and parks; and lifestyle choices, all in order to develop projects that use environmental psychology to solve urban problems.  Class size: 15

 

91903

EUS 305B   EUS Practicum: Opportunistic Architecture; The Social Art of Building

Anne Nelson

. . . . F

10:30 – 1:30 pm

HEG 308

SSCI

Cross listed: Experimental Humanities. This is an applied course that involves students in multiple stages of environmentally sustainable and cost-effective design, using a real-world project scheduled for completion in 2014. The challenge is to develop effective classroom and creative co-working spaces on the Bard campus, based on a design strategy using repurposed shipping containers. The final result should be wired and adapted for innovative digital teaching methods and flexible enough to serve multiple functions. The class will include readings, online research, and team projects to address specific elements of design. Students will divide into collaborative teams to research funding mechanisms and business plans; best practice in pedagogical design; and creative design for low-cost, ecologically responsible, and highly practical furniture and fixtures. Students will meet with the architect in charge of the Bard project, consult with experts in various related fields, and will produce both individual papers and team-generated proposals. Students must have moderated.  Class size: 18

 

91625

ANTH 101 A  Intro to Cultural Anthropology

Yuka Suzuki

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 203

SSCI/DIFF

 

91626

ANTH 101 B  Intro to Cultural Anthropology

Yuka Suzuki

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 203

SSCI/DIFF

 

91627

ANTH 111   Archaeological Field Methods

Christopher Lindner

. . W . .

. . . . F

4:40 -6:00 pm

1:00 -4:20 pm

HEG 300

ROSE 108

SCI

91634

ANTH 221   Ecologies of the Modern State

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 205

SSCI/DIFF

 

91315

ART 106 ED2  Sculpture I: Fluid Dynamics

Ellen Driscoll

. . . . F

10:10 -1:10 pm

FISHER 138

PART

 

 

91713

ARTH 125  Introduction to Themes in

 Western Architecture

Irene Sunwoo

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

PRE 110

AART

 

91705

ARTH 201   Greek Art and Architecture

Diana DePardo-Minsky

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:00 pm

OLIN 102

AART

 

91708

ARTH 225   Land into Landscape: Environment, Art, and Design in America

Julia Rosenbaum

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 102

AART

 

91718

ARTH 220   Early Medieval Art & Architecture

Katherine Boivin

M . W . .

1:30 – 2:50 pm

OLIN 102

AART

 

91927

ARTH 221   Romanesque & Gothic Art and Architecture

Katherine Boivin

. T . Th .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

OLIN 102

AART

 

91972

ARTH 283   Architectural Modernism

Irene Sunwoo

M . W . .

11:50 – 1:10 pm

OLIN 102

AART

 

91714

ARTH 378   Topics in Contemporary Architecture: Exhibiting Architecture

Irene Sunwoo

. T . . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

 

91440

BIO 130   Field Study in Natural History

William Maple

. T . Th .

1:30 -5:00 pm

RKC 114

SCI

 

91442

BIO 144   Biostatistics

Samuel Hsiao

. . W . F

1:30 -4:00 pm

RKC 100

MATC

 

91441

BIO 145   Environmental Microbiology

Brooke Jude

                      Lab:

M . W . .

. . . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 111

RKC 112

SCI

 

91603

BIO 153   Global Change Biology

Bruce Robertson

. T . . .

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

1:30 -3:30 pm

RKC 111/112

RKC 111/112

SCI

 

91444

BIO 202B   Ecology & Evolution

Bruce Robertson

. . W . .

. . . . F

8:30 - 11:30 am

9:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114/115

RKC 114/115

SCI

 

91446

BIO 206   Botany

William Maple

                          Lab:

. T . Th

. . . . F

8:30 -9:50 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 114

SCI

 

91605

BIO 415   Ecology of Infectious Disease

Felicia Keesing

. . W . .

1:30 -3:30 pm

RKC 200

SCI

 

91912

ECON 237  Economics of the Public Sector

James Green-Armytage

M . W . .

3:10 – 4:30 pm

ALBEE 106

SSCI

 

91650

ECON 242   Ecological Economics

Kris Feder

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

ALBEE 106

SSCI

 

91653

ECON 331   International Migration

Aniruddha Mitra

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

RKC 101

SSCI

 

91662

HIST 112   Three Cities: A History of Lagos, Nairobi, and Johannesburg

Drew Thompson

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

ALBEE 106

HIST

 

91658

HIST 139   City Cultures

Myra Armstead /

Cecile Kuznitz

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

RKC 103

HIST

 

91673

HIST 302   Environmental Diplomacy

Mark Lytle

. . . . F

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 301

HIST

 

91528

LIT 2039   Nature Fakers: Environment

in American Literature

Alexandre Benson

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 202

ELIT

 

91544

LIT 3308   Reading and Writing the Hudson

Susan Rogers

. T . . .

. . . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

8:30 - 11:30 am

ASP 302

Field Station

PART

 

91917

PHYS 124  Climate Change

Gidon Eshel

                      Lab A:

                      Lab B:

M . W . .

M . . . .

M . . . .

10:10 -11:30 am

12:00 – 1:45 pm

2:00 – 3:34 pm

HDR 106

ALBEE 100

ALBEE 100

SCI

 

91779

SOC 101   Introduction to Sociology

Sarah Egan

M . W .  .

11:50 – 1:30 pm

HEG 204

SSCI/DIFF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

91844

SOC 138   Introduction to Urban Sociology

Clement Thery

M . W .  .

8:30 -9:50 am

OLIN 201

SSCI

 

91780

SOC 205   Introduction to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

HDRANX 106

MATC

 

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These two graduate level courses are open by special arrangement to qualified undergraduates. Interested students must contact the Director of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy.

 

91980

CSP 511   Science of Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Climate Change

Jennifer Phillips

M . W . .

1:30 - 3:30 pm

ALBEE 102

SSCI

This course covers fundamental processes in ecosystems and agriculture, then investigates the interactions between these systems and climate, emphasizing the two-way relationship between climate and food, fiber and fuel production. The course emphasizes greenhouse gas emissions and the possible roles of ecosystems and agriculture in mitigating climate change via greenhouse gas uptake and surface albedo modifications. Students end the yearlong course with a firm understanding of both the theoretical foundations of agro-ecosystem-climate interactions and the applied policy context of carbon markets, offsets, and adaptation measures. Class lectures are complemented by field trips to experimental forests and farms. Prerequisites:  Preference to seniors. Calculus I and permission of the Director of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, Dr. Eban Goodstein (ebangood@bard.edu

 

91981

CSP 515   Climate Policy and Law I

Monique Segarra

. . . Th .

1:30 - 3:30 pm

ALBEE 102

SSCI

This course focuses on the legal, political, cultural, and ethical dimensions of the climate policy-making process. It provides an overview of basic concepts of environmental law, politics, and policy making, for a detailed analysis of U.S. and international climate law and policy. Students evaluate climate change responses that include incentive-based regulatory approaches (cap-and-trade and cap-and-dividend systems with offsets; carbon taxes), command and control approaches, direct promotion of clean technology through regulation and subsidy, and voluntary agreements. Students examine critical issues of monitoring and enforcement, climate equity, and climate federalism, as well as the relationships among local, state, federal, and international policy. Prerequisites: Preference to Seniors. Permission of the Director of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, Dr. Eban Goodstein (ebangood@bard.edu

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