91922

BIO 127†† Introduction to the Insects

Philip Johns

††††††††††††††††††††††††††† LAB:

. T . Th .

. . W . .

10:10 Ė 11:30 am

1:30 Ė 4:30 pm

RKC 111

RKC 114

SCI

In this course, students will use insects and other arthropods to explore biological topics.These topics will range from how bugs are put together, to how bugs reproduce and grow, to how bugs interact with their biological environment to do things like find food, catch prey, avoid predators, and compete for mates.Along the way we will also discuss how insects contribute to our understanding of broader topics, such as genetics, evolution, and disease.The course includes a laboratory and one weekend field trip. Prerequisite:  passing score on Part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic,and experience in high school biology and chemistry. Class size: 24

 

91440

BIO 130†† Field Study in Natural History

William Maple

. T . Th .

1:30 -5:00 pm

RKC 114

SCI

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies†† Designed to acquaint the interested non-science student with the plants and animals that make the Bard campus their home, including trees and shrubs in their winter condition and fall wildflowers.  Animal tracks and bird migrations also are objects of study. Although the course includes some lab work on preserved specimens, especially during severe weather, most class meetings are field trips. Participants must have clothing appropriate to the weather and terrain: good walking shoes or boots, warm clothing and rain gear. Some Saturday field trips and early morning meetings may be required. Class size: 18

 

91442

BIO 144†† Biostatistics

Samuel Hsiao

. . W . F

1:30 -4:00 pm

RKC 100

MATC

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies, Global & Intíl Studies†††This course introduces students to the statistical methods biologists use to describe and compare data. Students will learn methods are appropriate for different types of data. Topics covered include elementary probability and statistics, characteristics of frequency distributions, hypothesis testing, contingency tests, correlation and regression analysis, different ways to compare means, nonparametric tests, and an introduction to multivariate tests. This course is intended for sophomore and junior biology majors, although it is open to students of all years.  One objective of the course is to provide biology majors the statistical background they need to analyze data for their own senior research; biology students should take this course before their senior year, if possible. Notice, though, that the topics in this course are applicable to many advanced courses. Prerequisite: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic and at least one introductory biology course. Class size: 18

 

91441

BIO 145†† Environmental Microbiology

Brooke Jude

††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

M . W . .

. . . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 111

RKC 112

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies This introductory level course will introduce students to examining microbes in their native habitats while covering such basic biological concepts as DNA, RNA, and protein production, cellular replication, metabolism, respiration, and microbial genetics. Topics specific to microbial life will include ecological life cycles and microbial habitats, microbiomes, the microbial role in food production, antibiotic resistance, microbial fuel cells, biofilms and quorum sensing. There will be an introduction to reading of primary literature, case studies, and opportunities for in-class presentations on primary papers. During the inquiry-based laboratory, students will culture environmental microbes as well as learn techniques for identification and characterization novel environmental isolates. Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry.Class size: 20

 

92338

BIO 145 BEnvironmental Microbiology

Brooke Jude

††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. . W . F

M . . . .

8:30 - 9:50 am

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 111

RKC 114

SCI

See above

 

91923

BIO 150†† Evolution of Model Organisms

Philip Johns

†††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

M . W ..

M . . . .

10:10 Ė 11:30 am

1:30 Ė 4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 114

SCI

This is an introductory course intended for students with a strong interest in the sciences.  The goal of the course is to study the genetics and evolution of a variety of organisms.  We will also examine the interplay between genetics and evolution with topics ranging from ecology to behavior to physiology to biomechanics. A major theme of the course will be to understand why biologists often use a few "model organisms" -- including dogs -- to answer questions that apply to a broader array of plants and animals. The course includes a lab and one or two field trips.  Prerequisite: passing score on part I of the Mathematics Diagnostic and at least one introductory biology course.Class size: 20

 

91603

BIO 153†† Global Change Biology

Bruce Robertson

. T . . .

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

1:30 -3:30 pm

RKC 111/112

RKC 111/112

SCI

Cross-listed: Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & Intíl StudiesGlobal change biology is a new field of biology which explores the consequences of global environmental change for ecosystems and humans.This introductory level course focuses on climate change as a key driver of environmental change.We will explore the effects of climate change on the ecology of animals, plants, and microbes, includingbiodiversity and ecosystem function, but will also include discussion on how these biologically oriented questions relate to the interconnected issues of human society, politics, and the economy. In addition, we will focus on relevant physical topics including the astronomical basis for natural variation in climate (years to eons), basics of global weather (e.g. gyres and Hadley cells), glacial cycles and marine circulation. In the laboratory portion of the course students will analyze ice core data, and use a bevy of tools to predict changes in the timing of migration in birds and butterflies, and predict how climate change will affect the distribution and range of plant and animal species. This course is appropriate for students interested in continuing their studies in biology, and also for motivated students whose primary interest is in other disciplines.Class size: 18

 

91443

BIO 201A†† Genetics & Evolution

Michael Tibbetts

M . W . .

10:10 -1:10 pm

RKC 111/112

SCI

This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity within genomes.It takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity and its influence on phenotype.In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in processes like, recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can be used to: examine population structure, identify genes associated with complex traits, and examine evolutionary trends and mechanisms.The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the analysis of a model organismís genome to address one or more topics in the course.Offered every fall, this course is a pre-requisite for BIO 202A, which is offered every spring.Prerequisites: One semester of college-level biology. Class size: 18

 

91444

BIO 202B†† Ecology & Evolution

Bruce Robertson

. . W . .

. . . . F

8:30 - 11:30 am

9:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114/115

RKC 114/115

SCI

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies†† This core course for biology majors is an introduction to the general principles of ecology and evolution that, with genetics, form the core of biological understanding. In addition to studying foundational ideas in both ecology and evolution, we will explore modern topics at the boundary between these two areas. We will consider, for example, how genetic variation among individual organisms can influence ecological interactions, and how these interactions can influence fitness. We will focus on a mechanistic understanding of processes, using model-building to inform that understanding.Prerequisite: One biology course at the 140 level or higher.Class size: 18

 

91446

BIO 206†† Botany

William Maple

††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. T . Th

. . . . F

8:30 -9:50 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 114

SCI

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies†† This course consists of lectures, labs, and frequent field trips. The first part of the course surveys the plant kingdom and focuses on anatomy, histology, and physiology, with an emphasis on form, function, and adaptation. The last third of the semester covers local flora, taxonomy, and plant ecology. Prerequisites: Biology 141-142, Chemistry 141-142 or permission of the instructor. Class size: 18

 

91445

BIO 208†† Biology Seminar

Michael Tibbetts

. . . Th .

12:00 -1:00 pm

RKC 103

 

1 creditThis course will provide students with broad exposure to biology through the biology visiting speaker seminar series. Students will hear about the wide-ranging research interests of invited biologists and have opportunities to interact informally with them. The course is graded Pass/Fail and students are responsible for short follow-up assignments for at least 80% of the talks. Recommended for all biology majors and other interested students.

Class size: 60

 

91447

BIO 304†† Cell Biology

Michael Tibbetts

†††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. T . Th .

. . . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

8:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 102

RKC 114

SCI

This course examines the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in processes relating to eukaryotic cellular organization, communication, movement, reproduction, and death. These topics are considered through close reading of the primary and secondary literatures.Discussions of review articles on particular topics precede in-depth discussions of one or more research articles in those areas. The literature is read with the objective of understanding the current models describing cellular processes, as well as the experimental rationale and the modern techniques used to probe fundamental cellular mechanisms and test the models. The laboratory consists of a semester-long project in which a cellular process is investigated. Offered in alternate spring semesters. Prerequisites: Biology 201-202, and Chemistry 201-202. Class size: 15

 

91924

BIO 309†† Invertebrate Zoology

Aris Efting

†††††††††††††††††††††††††† Lab:

. T . Th .

. . . . F

4:40 Ė 6:00 pm

1:30 - 4:30 pm

RKC 102

RKC 111

SCI

In this course, we will take a comparative approach to studying zoology, with a special focus on marine invertebrates and aquatic invertebrates native to the Hudson Valley. We will also learn how to use different phylogenetic tools to study ecology, evolution, comparative morphology, biogeography, and speciation of different invertebrate groups.Laboratories will include comparative anatomy of different invertebrate phyla, DNA extraction and sequencing, and working with phylogenetic analysis software.This course will also include one or two field trips.Prerequisites: Biology 202 (Ecology and Evolution); Biology 201 (or permission of the instructor).Class size: 16

 

91606

BIO 405†† Immunology

Jamie Harden

. . . Th .

1:10 -3:10 pm

RKC 200

 

Cross-listed: Global & Intíl Studies-2 creditsThis course is an introduction to immunology. Basic concepts will be taught from a historical perspective to their present understanding. Special relevance will be given to the current unanswered questions of the field and their implications. The second part of this course is aimed at learning how to read a scientific article. For this we will discuss laboratory techniques, we will read and comment on papers in class, and groups of two students will present additional papers in the following classes. Finally we will take a look at uses of immunology concepts from alternative perspectives other than medical and basic research applications. This course is appropriate for students who have a biology background and want to gain a basic understanding of the field and its applications. Class size: 15

 

91605

BIO 415†† Ecology of Infectious Disease

Felicia Keesing

. . W . .

1:30 -3:30 pm

RKC 200

SCI

Cross-listed:Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & Intíl Studies†† ††2 creditsIn this course, we will begin by introducing ourselves to some of the major ideas and terms in the ecology of infectious diseases. Then we will read a range of selections from the current literature. We will cover a diversity of topics, from conservation of endangered species to the control of smallpox introductions in human populations.Class size: 15

 

91604

BIO 431†† Parasitology

Amy Savage

. T . . .

1:30 -3:30 pm

RKC 200

 

Cross-listed: Global & Intíl Studies†† ††2 creditsParasitic diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide.  Not all vectors or hosts are equally susceptible to parasite challenge, a factor that influences disease transmission dynamics.  In this seminar, we will focus a variety of eukaryotic parasitic diseases relevant to human health.    Emphasis will be placed on the examination of invasion and establishment processes used by these organisms as they are transmitted to their definitive or intermediate hosts.Discussion will be based on an examination of current primary research. Prerequisite: Upper College standing in biology. Class size: 15