91625

ANTH 101 A  Intro to Cultural Anthropology

Yuka Suzuki

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 203

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies;  Global & Int’l StudiesThis course explores the intellectual angles through which anthropologists have engaged culture as a central, and yet elusive concept in understanding how societies work. The analysis of culture has undergone many transformations over the past century, from arguing for the existence of integrated systems of thought and practice among so-called ‘primitives,’ to scrutinizing the cultural values of colonial subjects, to attempting to decipher the anatomy of enemy minds during World War II.  In recent years, anthropology has become more self-reflexive, questioning the discipline’s authority to represent other societies, and critiquing its participation in the creation of exoticized others.  With our ethnographic gaze turned inward as well as outward, we will combine discussions, lectures, and films to reflect upon the construction of social identity, power, and difference in a world where cultures are undergoing rapid reification.  Specific topics we will examine include the transformative roles of ritual and symbol; witchcraft and sorcery in historical and contemporary contexts; cultural constructions of gender and sexuality; and nationalism and the making of majorities and minorities in post-colonial states.  Class size: 22

 

91626

ANTH 101 B  Intro to Cultural Anthropology

Yuka Suzuki

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 203

SSCI/DIFF

See above.  Class size: 22

 

91983

MUS 185   Introduction to Ethnomusicology

Andrew Eisenberg

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BITO 210

AART

Cross-listed: Anthropology   Ethnomusicology encompasses the study of music-making throughout the world, from the distant past to the present. Ethnomusicologists examine music as central to human experience throughout space and time, and explore its profound relationship to cognition, emotion, language, dance, visual arts, spiritual belief, social organization, collective identity, politics, economics, and the physical body. Students will study the performing arts as culture. This course will introduce students to the history, theories, and methodologies of the field of ethnomusicology through weekly readings and multi-media. It will also be a project-based seminar, driven by student’s individual ethnographic projects and themes. Class size: 20

 

91933

ANTH 211   Field Methods in Environmental Archaeology – Native Peoples on Bard’s Lands [Practicum]

Christopher Lindner

. . W . .

. . . . F

4:40 -6:00 pm

11:50 -4:20 pm

HEG 300

ROSE 108

SCI

Cross-listed: American Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies   Fall will be the 3rd season of excavation at the 6,000-year-old Forest site after its discovery in Spring 2012 and the expansion of testing last semester. Two hearths or fireplaces were initially found that could become the focus of a senior project in paleoethnobotany. Each introductory student concentrates on the location of another activity area for the manufacture and use of stone tools. Their utilization can be identified in the lab by replicative experimentation and microscopic analysis of wear patterns. Knowledge of this key early millennium in our region is sparse. The goal of this season’s practicum is an exhibit and its implementation to enhance awareness of preservation issues in the Bard community that includes Native Americans, students of various ages, and local citizenry. The skills, technical and conceptual, that Bardians learn in the course equip them for participation in the field of Cultural Resource Management. The class will meet on Wednesdays for discussion of background texts on CRM, archaeological sites at Bard, and the Lenape [“people” in their language]. Field and lab work will take place on Fridays and Saturday afternoons. Enrollment 12, by interview with the professor. Class size: 12

 

91630

ANTH 213   Anthropology of Medicine

Diana Brown

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 201

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender & Sexuality Studies;  Global & Int’l Studies; Human Rights; Science, Technology & Society   From an ethnomedical perspective, all notions of health and illness and forms of treatment are taken as socioculturally constructed, embedded within global systems of knowledge and power and hierarchies of gender, class and race. This course will explore medical knowledge and practice in a variety of healing systems including that of western biomedicine, focusing on the human body as the site where illness is experienced, and upon which social meanings and political actions are inscribed.  We will be concerned with how political economic systems, and the inequalities they engender--poverty, violence, discrimination--affect human well-being.  Readings and films will represent different ethnographic perspectives on embodied experiences of illness and bodily imagery and treatment within widely differing sociopolitical systems.  Topics will include biomedical constructs and body imagery, non-biomedical illnesses and healing systems including those in contemporary American society, the shaping of epidemic diseases such as malaria, TB and AIDS, colonial and post-colonial constructions of diseased bodies, cosmetic medical interventions, and new medical technologies. Class size: 22

 

91634

ANTH 221   Ecologies of the Modern State

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 205

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & Int’l Studies; Political Studies; Science, Technology & Society   In four broad phases this course seeks to explore the following questions: 1) What is a state? 2) Whose is the state? 3) How are states built? 4) Where is the state? We will draw on ethnographically- and historically-based research in places like the United States, India, South Africa, Turkey, France, Syria, Indonesia, England, Mozambique, Gaza, Venezuela, Nigeria and Iraq. In conjunction with reading foundational theoretical texts from the broader social sciences (e.g. Althusser, Hall, Abrams, Foucault, Weber, Bourdieu, Harvey), reading cases from these places will allow us to investigate the unlikely relationships between phenomena such as corruption, railroads, the standardization of time, nuclear power, bureaucracies, forest fires and scientists, on the one hand, and the effects, and effectiveness, of statehood in the modern world, on the other. Our journey will be genealogical as much as it will be theoretical. Therefore, we will pay close attention to the historical coproduction of colonizing states, colonies and nationalisms as well as to the role of statehood, state-building and state aspirations in shaping the postcolonial condition. At the same time, we will assume that material or environmental conditions, scientific practices and technologies are sociotechnical objects (per Latour) that, similarly, must be scrutinized for the extent to which they afford, or are manipulated by, forces we usually think of as exclusively political, economic, cultural or social.  Class size: 22

 

91631

ANTH 250   Reading Baseball as Metaphor

Mario Bick

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 303

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed:  American Studies  Baseball has often been labeled the quintessential American sport. This course explores that claim while it examines the history and diffusion of the game, its performance and representation, and its connections to the politics, of work, ethnicity, race, gender, class, region, and place. Cultural constructions are explored and contrasted in baseball as played in the United States, Japan, and Latin America. Sources in fiction, film, and analytic literature are employed, in conjunction with attendance at amateur (Little League) and professional baseball games. In addition, comparisons with soccer (football), the world's sport, will be explored. Class size: 18

 

91632

ANTH 256   Race and Ethnicity in Brazil

Mario Bick

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 203

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Africana Studies; Global & Int’l Studies; Human Rights; Jewish Studies; LAIS   Brazil, in contrast to the United States, has been portrayed by Brazilians and others, as a "racial democracy". The course examines the debate over the "problem of race" in its early formulation shaped by scientific racism and eugenics, especially the fear of degeneration. It then turns to the Brazilian policy of the 19th and early 20th centuries of branquemento (whitening) which was the basis of large-scale migration to Brazil from all major regions of Europe. These "ethnic" populations settled mainly in southern and south central Brazil leading to significant regional differences in identity politics and racial attitudes. The interplay of "racial" vs. "ethnic" identities is crucial to understanding the allocation of resources and status in Brazilian society. Inequality in contemporary Brazil is explored in terms of the dynamics of racial ideologies, the distribution of national resources and the performance of identity as shaped by "racial" and "ethnic" strategies, and recent government policies. The groups to be discussed are: indigenous/native Brazilians, the Luso-Brazilians, Japanese Brazilians, Euro-ethic Brazilians, and Brazilians of Arab and Jewish descent. Class size: 22

 

91849

ANTH / SOC 267   Media, Power & Social Change

Sarah Egan

M . W . .

3:10 – 4:30 pm

OLIN LC 210

SSCI

See Sociology section for description.

 

91633

ANTH 288   Anthropology of  the Modern Middle East

Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 203

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies, Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights, Middle Eastern Studies  What does Islamic feminism look like? What is the relationship between Egyptian piety and cassette tapes? Does silence actually mean consent? These are a few of the questions this course, which is a survey of some of the major topics that have preoccupied scholars of the Modern Middle East, aims to answer. Our emphasis will be on anthropological texts, but we will also examine a select number of texts by political scientists, literary scholars and sociologists whose work has become crucial to anthropological understandings of the Middle East and of the Muslim World. We will read ethnographically-based analyses of Egypt, Morocco, Lebanon, Yemen, Syria, Israel, Palestine, Turkey and Iran. In doing so, we will tack back and forth between an examination of how and why scholarship has chosen certain theoretical and ethnographic “hotspots” (e.g. women, Islam), on the one hand, and an in-depth discussion and analysis of the particular themes themselves (e.g. the relationship between colonialism and the nation), on the other.  The overarching aim of this class will be to complicate the popular assumption that the areas that constitute what is known as "the Middle East" are culturally static, politically predictable or socially homogeneous, by exploring the diverse cultural, political and material worlds that shape collective life and individual subjectivity there.  Class size: 22

 

91636

ANTH / HIST 3103   Political Ritual in the

Modern World

Robert Culp

M . . . .

1:00 -3:20 pm

ASP 302

HIST/DIFF

See History section for description.

 

92107

ANTH 316   Anthropology of Sound

Andrew Eisenberg

. . . Th .

3:10 – 5:30 pm

OLINLC 208

HUM

Cross-listed:  Experimental Humanities; Music  This course examines a rich and expanding body of ethnographic writing and multimedia work on human engagements with sound and the ways in which aural capacities, sounding and listening practices, and sound technologies are embedded in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics to be covered include cultural understandings of sound, noise, and music; ethnographic listening and recording in the history of anthropological practice; the sensorium and the anthropology of the senses; soundscape studies; acoustemology; the voice and vocal anthropology; and the role of sound in the production of public and private spaces and spheres. However defined, the anthropology of sound is a highly interdisciplinary enterprise, nurtured by communications studies, human geography, linguistics, music studies, phenomenology, science and technology studies, and other fields. Course materials—including articles, chapters, books, and audiovisual recordings—will reflect this interdisciplinarity; however, they will bear a heavier emphasis on ethnography than is often found within the broader realm of “sound studies.” Assignments will include a final project involving limited ethnographic “participant-audition” and possibly sound(scape) recording. Class size: 15

 

91637

ANTH 350   Contemporary Cultural Theory

Yuka Suzuki

. T . . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 310

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed: Human Rights   This course is intended as an introduction to advanced theories of culture in contemporary anthropology.  Required of all anthropology majors, this course will also be of interest to students wishing to explore critical innovations in the study of local, national, and mass culture around the world.  In contrast to early anthropological focus on seemingly isolated, holistic cultures, more recent studies have turned their attention to contest within societies and the intersection of local systems of meaning with global processes of politics, economics and history.  The class will be designed around an influential social theorist, such as Bourdieu, Bakhtin, or Marx, and the application of their theories by anthropologists, such as Aihwa Ong, Judith Irvine, or Michael Taussig.  The seminar will involve participation from all of the faculty in the anthropology department.  It aims to inspire critical engagement with an eye towards developing theoretical tools and questions for a senior project that makes use of contemporary theories of culture.  Required for all moderated Anthropology majors. Class size: 15