By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case. In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance). It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

 

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers music. Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project.

 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each. In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra. In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances. An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

 

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit. It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly. If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credit may be added. Private lessons must be separately registered.

 

91602

MUS 104 Bard College Orchestra

Geoffrey McDonald

M . . . .

7:30 - 10:30 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held for new members, date to be determined. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7131. * First Orchestra rehearsal will be announced. * (Please be prepared to play two piecesone slower and lyrical, and one faster.) Class size: 30

 

91603

MUS 105 Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

1 credit. First rehearsal will be on Tuesday September 11, 2012. Class size: 35

 

91604

MUS 106 Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

TBA

 

.

PART

2 credits. Class size: 20

 

91605

MUS 108D Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits. Auditions will be held by appointment for new members. Class size: 30

 

91606

MUS 108F Ensemble: Jazz Big Band

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

91641

MUS 108G Ensemble: Chamber/Cello

Garfield Moore

. . . . F

5:00 -7:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 12

 

91652

MUS 108G Ensemble: Chamber Ensemble

of Any Instruments

Patricia Spencer

. T . . .

7:30 9:30 pm

Bard Hall

PART

The large variety of works written for any instruments invites exploration of atypical groupings flute, marimba and tuba have been known to project wonderful blends.  This repertoire often requires a high degree of responsibility on the part of the performer, not only choosing dynamics and tempos but also instrumentation of various phrases and sometimes overall structure.  Members of this ensemble will engage in musical thinking outside the bounds of normal chamber music, and will discover how (or if) that may open a new dimension in their approach to more conventional performance. Repertoire under consideration: Frederic Rzewski, Attica; Arnold Schoenberg, Canon for Thomas Mann, and other canons; Christian Wolff, Snowdrop; Judith Shatin, Grito del Corazn; Kurt Schwitters, Ursonate (selection); Stefan Wolpe, Selections from Music for Any Instruments Class size: 10

 

91607

MUS 108H Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Tomie Hahn

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

TBA

PART

Class size: 22

 

91773

MUS 108I Ensemble: Electro-Acoustic

Marina Rosenfeld

. . . Th .

4:40 -6:40 pm

Bard Hall

PART

Class size: 14

 

91608

MUS 108J Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

91609

MUS 108N Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:30 -6:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composers works, ranging from sextet to big band. This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music. There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester. Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed. Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer. Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting. Class size: 12

 

MUSIC COURSES

 

91613

MUS 127 History of the Keyboard

Peter Laki

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N217

AART

This course will assume no previous knowledge about music. It will introduce students to the history of Western music through an exploration of the keyboard instruments. (organ, harpsichord, piano) and their evolution over the centuries. Students will also become acquainted with some of the great keyboard performers of the past and the present. There will be a reading list, three quizzes and a term paper. Class size: 20

 

91626

MUS 169 String Quartets: Romantic Nationalism in Music from Beethoven through Debussy

Marka Gustavsson

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

In grappling with his deafness, Beethovens heroic struggle with Fate manifested itself in his music in what E. T. A. Hoffman described as a new spirit of Romanticism. The thread of this overtly passionate expression continued to impact nineteenth century artistic movements. Definitions of identity through language and folk customs formed a significant movement of cultural nationalism in music and led to the creation of very striking works distinguished by their blending of idiomatic folk musics into formal concert music. This course will focus on the stylistic transformation of music during the nineteenth century through the genre of the string quartet. Assignments will include two papers (5-6 pp), one concert review, informal writing in class, and a final project. Knowledge of music notation is not required. Class size: 20

 

91611

MUS 171 Jazz Harmony I

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

2 credits Introduces the basic harmonic structures that are components of the blues and the Tin Pan Alley songs that modern jazz musicians used as vehicles for improvisation. Basic keybaord skils are learned and the history of jazz from ragtime to the swing era is survyed. Required course for moderating into the jazz program. Class size: 20

 

91612

MUS 173 Jazz Ear Training I

John Esposito

M . W . .

9:45 - 10:29 am

BLM N211

PART

2 credits The practice of the technical/aesthetic fundamentals specific to jazz as a 20th century African-American music. It includes the practice of the syncopted rhythmic language underlying linear melodic phrasing. The harmonic work includes singing the basic 20th century harmonic materials, blues melodies and transcriptions of solos by jazz masters. Required course for moderating into the jazz program. It is suggested that Jazz Ear Training I and Jazz Harmony I be taken together. Students who have already completed Jazz Harmony I may take Jazz Ear Training separately. Class size: 20

 

91619

MUS 201 Music Theory I

Erika Switzer

M . . . .

. T W Th F

1:30 -2:50 pm

1:30 -2:50 pm

BDH

BLM N217

AART

This course serves as an introduction to music theory and music making, and is the entry-level course to the classical theory sequence. Basics of musical notation will be the starting point, after which we will move quickly to scales and recognition of triads and seventh chords, as well as rhythmic performance. At all times the course will emphasize analysis of real music, and an ear-training component will reinforce the theoretical knowledge with practical experience. There are no prerequisites; the course serves as prerequisite for Music Theory II and all high-level theory courses. This fulfills theory requirements. Class size: 20

 

91615

MUS 211 Jazz in Literature I

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies This course presents some of the short stories and poems by Rudolph Fisher, Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, and Julio Cortazar. The text used in this section is Hot and Cool by Marcela Briton and the Harlem Renaissance Reader, edited by David Lewis. Class size: 18

 

91616

MUS 217 Voice, Body, Machine:

Women Artists and the Evolution of the Composer - Performer

Marina Rosenfeld

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N110

AART

This class explores the works and legacy of a diverse group of artists, mostly female, whose hybrid, often interdisciplinary practices challenged conventional ideas of embodiment, performance, expression and technology, and redefined the fields of experimental and electronic music during the last half-century. Course work includes critical writing as well as creative compositional and/or performance work. Artists considered include Pauline Oliveros, Yoko Ono, Joan La Barbara, Alison Knowles, Maryanne Amacher, Eliane Radigue, Diamanda Galas, Laetitia Sonami, Pamela Z. Terre Thaemlitz, Slits, Kembra Pfahler, Kaffe Matthews, Fe-Matt, Sachiko M, and others. Class size: 20

 

91631

MUS 239 Monsters! Madness!
 Mayhem! Embracing the 
Wild Side of Baroque Music

Alexander Bonus

. . W . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

BDH

AART

Due to the conventions of popular culture, baroque music has received a reputation for being primarily elegant and soothing-a background soundtrack intended for fancy dinner parties or a good nap. This course strongly challenges such misconceptions by exploring the volatile, passionate themes regularly expressed in music spanning from the late 16th through 18th centuries. We will analyze vocal and instrumental works for the chamber, church, and stage that evoke the darker side of human nature and mythology. Focus is given to Monteverdi, Purcell, Lully, Scarlatti, Handel, and J.S. Bach. Their lesser-known compositions show that a great deal of baroque music is wildly inappropriate for todays typical wedding ceremony. Class size: 15

 

91618

MUS 254A Pronunciation & Diction

for Singers I

Erika Switzer

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature. The fall semester will be devoted to the Italian and French languages, the spring to German, English, and Latin. Through songs, arias, and choral literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language. While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent. Grading will be based on a series of quizzes and two exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language. Ability to read music is not required. No previous knowledge of the languages is required. Class size: 20

 

92016

MUS 256 Orchestration

George Tsontakis

M . . . .

4:40 7:00 pm

BLM N217

PART

Students will learn how to score for instrumental combinations beginning with small ensembles up to full orchestra. There will be live demonstrations of orchestral instruments, listening and score study of orchestral literature, chord voicing and notation of bowings, breathing, articulations, and special orchestral effects as well as practice of basic conducting patterns and skills. Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Music and composition workshop. There will be a reading of the orchestrations by the Bard College Orchestra. Class size: 15

 

91620

MUS 264 Literature and Language of Music I

Peter Laki

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed from Gregorian chant in the Middle Ages to the early works of Beethoven around 1800. Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits. In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire. Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams. As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected. This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. It is not required that students take the second semester, which will survey music from Beethoven to the present day. Class size: 20

 

91622

MUS 266C Jazz Repertory: BEBOP Masters

John Esposito

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N211

PART

This performance based course is a survey of the principal composers and performers of the BEBOP Era. Musicians included are Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro, Bud Powell, Max Roach and others. The course will include readings, recorded music and films. The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony I or permission of instructor. This can be taken as a companion course with Jazz Harmony II. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 20

 

91623

MUS 285 Introduction to Ethnomusicology

Tomie Hahn

M . . . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

OLIN 104

AART

Cross-listed: Anthropology   Ethnomusicology encompasses the study of music-making throughout the world, from the distant past to the present. Ethnomusicologists examine music as central to human experience throughout space and time, and explore its profound relationship to cognition, emotion, language, dance, visual arts, spiritual belief, social organization, collective identity, politics, economics, and the physical body. Students will study the performing arts as culture. This course will introduce students to the history, theories, and methodologies of the field of ethnomusicology through weekly readings and multi-media. It will also be a project-based seminar, driven by students individual ethnographic projects and themes. Class size: 12

 

91624

MUS 304 Arithmetic of Listening

Kyle Gann

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course is an introduction to the overtone series and the history of tuning. Learn how tuning shapes the course of a cultures music; trace the parallel development of music and the number series back 2500 years to the teachings of Pythagoras. Hear how Bach's and Beethovens music sounded in its original tunings. Learn how to discriminate the pitch subtleties that differentiate Indian music, Balinese music, and even the blues from our conventional European tuning, and discover how American composers like Harry Partch, Ben Johnston, and La Monte Young have created a new tonal universe from the in-between pitches. Most importantly, sensitize yourself to aspects of listening that we 21st century Westerners have been trained to filter out. Final project in this class may take the form of a tuning-based analysis of either European (pre-20th century) or world music; design and/or construction of a musical instrument; or a performance of original work involving alternate tunings. Basic ability to read music is strongly recommended for this course, though it may be compensated for by a background in mathematics or acoustics. Class size: 15

 

91629

MUS 320 Musical Electronics: Analog Synthesis & Processing

Robert Bielecki

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course concentrates on the creative use of electronic circuitry and the construction of devices for musical applications. Students will develop an understanding of how basic electronic components are used in audio circuits and how to read schematic diagrams. Well discuss topics such as Voltage Control, Synthesis, Filtering, Waveshaping, Phase Shifting, Ring Modulation, Theremins, Circuit Bending, etc. Well work from existing designs and also create new devices as we hone our skills of soldering, point-to-point wiring and layout. Familiarity with basic electronics and the use of hand tools is helpful but not a prerequisite for this class. Class size: 15

 

91610

MUS 323 Conducting

James Bagwell

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This course will introduce the advanced student to the basic elements of conducting. While the development of the physical gesture and rehearsal techniques will be the primary goals, we will also work on score reading, ear training, instrumental transposition, and historical performance practice. Repertoire will include both orchestral and choral repertoire. Evaluation will be based on the individuals improvement in gesture and rehearsal technique. Prerequisites for the course are the successful completion of Music Theory I and II or equivalent. This course is open to both Conservatory and Music Program students. Enrollment: 6 students. 4 credits. Class size: 6

 

91625

MUS 324 Mahler & Fin-de-Siecle Vienna

Christopher Gibbs

M . . . .

2:00 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will explore aspects of the musical, cultural, and political world of fin-de-sicle Vienna through an examination of the life and works of Gustav Mahler (1860-1911). We will consider the genesis of his songs and symphonies, their literary sources, and initial reception. Mahlers accomplishment will be situated with regard to his older and younger musical contemporaries, most notably Richard Wagner, Johannes Brahms, Anton Bruckner, Richard Strauss, Arnold Schoenberg, and Alban Berg. Taking a broader view, we will look at the artistic, intellectual, and political trends in Mahlers Vienna through studying works by Sigmund Freud (whom Mahler consulted when his marriage was in trouble), Arthur Schnitzler, Karl Kraus, Stefan Zweig, Gustav Klimt, and others. This course will be connected with performances by Leon Botstein and the American Symphony Orchestra of Mahlers Eighth Symphony at Carnegie Hall in New York City (in which Bard students will be singing in the chorus) and of the Second Symphony at the Fisher Center (in which Bard students will be singing and playing). Class size: 15

 

91627

MUS 331 Jazz: The Freedom Principle I

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies A jazz study of the cross-pollination between Post-Bop in the late fifties and Free Jazz. The course, which employs a cultural approach, is also designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music to examine its effects on the music from 1958 to the mid-sixties. Emphasis will be on artists and composers such as Cecil Taylor, Ornette Coleman, Art Blakey, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Max Roach, Eric Dolphy, Charles Mingus, and Horace Silver. Illustrated with recordings, films, and videos. Class size: 15

 

91614

MUS 356 Arranging Techniques: Jazz

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This composition class will focus on the various techniques used in jazz ensemble writing from trio to quintet ensembles with heavy emphasis on rhythm section arranging. Final projects will be recorded or performed live at the end of the semester. This is an advanced seminar class for moderated music majors. Prerequisite are Jazz Composition I and II or the permission of the instructor. Class size: 15

 

91642

MUS 359 The Classics of Modernism

Kyle Gann

. . W . F

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

The decades from 1910 to 1970 saw an explosion of dissonance, complexity, and apparent musical chaos. And yet, beneath the surface it was also an era of unprecedented intricacy of structure and musical systematization. The liberation of dissonance and dissolution of melody left composers insecure, and they often compensated by creating systems of tremendous rigor not always apparent to the listener. This course will analyze in depth several works that changed the way we think about composing, and which pioneered the growth of an atonal musical language. Explore the cinematographic intercutting of Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps; the tonal axis system of Bartok's Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion; the elegant number structures of Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time; the delicate symmetries of Webern's Symphonie Op. 21; the total organization of Stockhausen's Gruppen; the fanatical precision of Babbitt's Post-Partitions; and the compelling multi tempo climaxes of Nancarrow's Study No. 36. Intended for music majors, but other strongly motivated students are welcome. Prerequisite: Theory 1 and 2 or the equivalent (ability to analyze tonal harmony). Class size: 15

 

91617

MUS 363 John Cage and His World

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N110

AART

Cross-listed:  Science, Technology & Society   Long reviled as a charlatan or a madman, John Cage, born 100 years ago this year, has finally achieved recognition as probably the most influential composer and musical thinker of the mid-latter twentieth century.  The course will focus primarily on analysis of Cages music, encompassing such innovations as the prepared piano, chance, and indeterminacy.  It will be set in the context of the work and thought of his numerous teachers and influences, as well as colleagues and collaborators from the worlds of music (Satie, Schoenberg, Varese, Cowell, Harrison, Feldman, Brown, Wolff, Tudor), visual arts (Duchamp, Futurism, Dada Fluxus, Rauschenberg, Johns), dance (Cunningham and others) religious thought (Meister Eckhard, Hinduism, Taoism, the I Ching, Zen Buddhism) literature, political and social writing (Thoreau, Joyce, Fuller, McLuhan). Student work may take the form of papers, analyses, realizations and performances of Cage scores, or creation of new works inspired by Cagean examples.  Texts will include Silence, A Year from Monday, and other writings by and about Cage. By consent of the instructor. This course fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

91630

MUS 366A Advanced Contemporary Jazz Techniques I

John Esposito

. . . Th .

11:50 -2:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course introduces methods for the jazz improviser to deconstruct and reorganize the basic harmonic and rhythmic elements for a composition. Issues addressed will include reharmonization, remetering, metric modulation, variations in phrasing, tempo, and dynamics; that is, the arrangement and reorganization of compositional elements. This is performance oriented class and repertoire will include jazz standards and compositions of the instructor. This class is open to moderated upper college students who have successfully completed Jazz Harmony I and II, and previous jazz repertory classes. This course fulfills an upper level music theory requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

Music Workshops (2 credits unless otherwise stated)

 

91633

MUS WKSHA Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

3:00 -5:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement. Students should email Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility.

Class size: 18

 

91634

MUS WKSHB Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart /

Blair McMillen

. T . Th .

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

4:00 -6:30 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration. Students choose one of the three sessions. Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart by phone to determine eligibility (x6147). Class size: 20

 

91639

MUS WKSHD Sight Reading Workshop

Michael DeMicco

. T . . .

12:00 -1:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits This workshop is designed to improve basic music reading skills. Drawing from a varied selection of material such as lead sheets, jazz fake

book charts and simple to intermediate classical etudes, students learn to read melody and rhythm more confidently. This course works well for C

(concert) instruments and may be adapted for other instruments as well. Class size: 12

 

91638

MUS WKSHF Samba School

Carlos Valdez

. . W . .

. . . . F

4:00 - 6:00 pm

12:00 -2:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits Samba School provides the opportunity to learn exotic Brazilian rhythms (samba, maracatu, batucada, samba reggae). All skill levels welcome.

Class size: 25

 

91643

MUS WKSHJ New Music/New Music Performance

Blair McMillen

. T . . .

6:30 -8:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class will explore a wide variety of 20th and 21st-century music through live performances, discussions, listening assignments, and talks by visiting or faculty artists. A stylistically omnivorous class, we will study and work on: conventionally-notated scores, popular music, the recent alt-classical movement, improvisatory works and graphic scores, electro-acoustic music, and much else. Students will rehearse on their own in smaller combinations outside of class, and will be encouraged to perform regularly. There will be an end-of-semester concert. Open to instrumentalists, singers, and composers from both the Conservatory and the Music Program. Class size: 14

 

91635

MUS WKSHL Workshop: Opera Workshop

Rufus Muller /

Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

5:00 -7:30 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits Work is to be decided. For more information see Prof. LoMonaco. Contact  Prof. LoMonaco by email: Ilka98@aol.com to arrange an audition before registration. Class size: 20

 

91653

MUS WKSHM Workshop: Performance Class: "It's a Zoo!"   

Rufus Muller

M . . . .

3:00 -5:20 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits Recitals are often boring.  This performance-oriented course is for singers and pianists interested in developing ways of communicating vividly with an audience.  We shall focus on art songs based on the natural world - animals, fish, insects, birds and bees - from all eras and in all languages, with guidance on diction.  There will be a public recital at the end of semester. Contact Prof. Mller by email: rumu2000@earthlink.net to arrange an audition before registration. Class size: 20

 

91632

MUS WKSHN "Hands-on" Music History

Patricia Spencer /

Peter Laki

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits Members of this class will explore our musical past by playing it!  Also improving sight reading, the course will cover a sampling of chamber music from different eras.  Members will build familiarity with a wide variety of harmonies and musical styles (mostly European) from the Renaissance through the present.  Background readings and class discussion about the composers will provide historical context for the works being played. Parts and scores will be provided one week in advance for those who prefer to prepare their sight-reading.  Composers may include but are not limited to: Gesualdo, Machaut, di Lasso, Monteverdi, Purcell, Frederick the Great, J.S. Bach and his sons, Vivaldi, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Dvorak, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Ravel, Copland, Cage, Carter, Rzewski and many more.  Works will not be rehearsed to a performance level, but may occasionally be repeated.   Class size: 20

 

91636

MUS WKSP3 Workshop: Jazz Improvisation I

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40 -7:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits This class serves as an introduction to jazz improvisation. It is intended for incoming jazz ensemble players who would like to develop as improvisers, or classical players who would like to explore improvisational techniques in a jazz framework. Class size: 16

 

91637

MUS WKSP7 Jazz Vocal Workshop

Pamela Pentony

M . . . .

4:00 -6:59 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits Beginning level course:  The Jazz Vocal Workshop is a performance workshop designed to familiarize the beginning singer with the components of a successful jazz performance.  How to begin a song (intros) and how to end a song (outros and turnarounds), how to pick a key, a song and a tempo.  How to utilize simple (and not so simple) arrangements.  Particular attention is paid to phrasing.  The language of scat singing is explored, with emphasis on practice in every class.  The forms of the blues, rhythm changes and 32 bar song form, and practical applications taken from The Great American Songbook.  There is one (or more) concert(s) scheduled during the semester and students are encouraged to seek out and perform in many local venues.  There is a final exam in this class. Class size: 16

 

91640

MUS WKSPX Music Software for Composition and Performance

Miguel Frasconi

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

4 credits This class will explore popular software used in music today. The main focus will be on Ableton Live, both as a composing/performing tool and as a host for software instruments and audio plugins. Programs such as Kontakt, Absynth, Reason, and Reaktor will also be explored as well as the use of hardware controllers and smart-phone devices. Through weekly assignments, students will learn how to integrate audio processing with acoustic instruments, use audio clips and re-sampling in an interactive environment, and mix finished compositions. Creative use of these techniques will be encouraged and the student's own work shared through weekly listening sessions and a final concert. Students should have their own copy of Ableton Live (Intro or full version) or arrange regular access to the department's computers. Class size: 16