92025

EUS 101 Introduction to Environmental

and Urban Studies

Kris Feder

M . W . .

3:10 4:30 pm

HEG 204

SSCI

No species has more profoundly altered the character of Earths biosphere than has humanity since the advent of agriculture and urbanization 10,000 years ago. Today, global problems engendered by human impacts on the environment are reaching crisis proportions. Climate disruption, species extinctions, and depletion of fossil fuels, fossil soils, and fossil waters are all accelerating. These irreversible changes are tightly interlinked with one another but also with social problems such as food insecurity, financial instability, widening economic inequality, intensifying conflict and militarization, and declining public health. The EUS program seeks to understand these phenomena and to identify ways of addressing them, recognizing that their systemic complexity demands an interdisciplinary approach. In this course, we review the empirical evidence of major environmental problems; consider which academic disciplines and practical skills are required to tackle them; and contemplate alternative political options open to governments, organizations, and communities. Issues will be considered at a variety of scalesfrom the level of individual responsibility to the local, regional, national, and global dimensions. This is a reading- and discussion-based course. Students will undertake three types of writing assignments: Brief responses for class discussion; a book review; and a literature review focused on scholarly journal publications. (EUS 101 and 102 are the foundational courses of the program for first-year students and are required for moderation.) Class size: 22

 

91920

EUS 210 The Global Future of Food

Michael Specter

. . . . F

9:30 -12:30 pm

OLIN 204

SSCI

Few issues cause more strident debate than those involving the way we grow our food.  In the United States, calories are plentiful and cheap but with twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes those calories are killing us.  In many parts of the developing world, the opposite is true: more than a billion people go to bed hungry every night. And the gap is growing. How do we address these very different problems? Organic food has become something akin to a religion in many places, but by 2050, this planet will need to support three billion more people than it does today. That means producing, in the next thirty or so years, as much food as we have grown so far in all of human history. Is there any way to do that while shunning the use of sophisticated scientific tools particularly genetically modified food? This course will examine one of our most fundamental problems: is it possible to overhaul our badly broken system of industrial agriculture, and feed the Earths rapidly growing population, while also growing safe, plentiful and nutritious food? Class size: 22

 

91405

EUS 230 Urban Design Theory and Practice

Vivek Sheth

M . W . .

. . . . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 - 4:30 pm

OLIN 102

OLIN 202

 

2 credits This course introduces students to the principles of urban design. Students will explore urban and regional issues in class discussion and lectures (such as transportation and sustainability, creating healthy public spaces and designing with nature), in addition to coming up with solutions in a month-long studio. Skills learned will include: landscape mapping and documentation, spatial analysis and design principles. This class will be taught by a practicing architect, so students will be able to learn the process through which design professionals intervene in varied built and natural environments. This class will meet from Sept. 3 Oct. 5th. Class size: 22

 

91713

EUS 240 Advanced Reading in Environmental Science

Gidon Eshel

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 pm

OLIN 302

SSCI

While prohibitively technical at times, some fundamental advances in environmental science can be translated into English and made at least partially palatable for the curious, motivated student. This seminar-style course will explore, in detail, several key papers of recent years covering climate change, water resources and agriculture. Class size: 10

 

91920

EUS / HIST 280A American Environmental

History I

Mark Lytle

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 201

HIST

Cross-listed: American Studies, Environmental & Urban Studies; Human Rights; Social Policy Since the Old World first encountered the New, a struggle has taken place over what this new world might become.  For some, it meant moral and spiritual rejuvenation.  For most, it meant an opportunity to tap a natural warehouse of resources that could be turned into wealth.  At no time have those two visions been compatible, despite the efforts of politicians, artists, and scientists to reconcile them.  This course is about that struggle.  It looks specifically at the United States from the colonial era until the early Twentieth Century--a period in which one of the worlds most abundant wildernesses was largely transformed into an urbanized, industrial landscape.  We will study the costs and consequences of that transformation while listening to the voices of those who proposed alternative visions. This course satisfies the EUS introductory course requirement. Class size: 22

 

91575

EUS 305 Urban Practicum: Hudson Valley

Matthew Slaats

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

HDR 106

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies This is an applied course that focuses on the intersection of natural and built environments in the Hudson Valley. The 'practicum' element of this course involves work on a Poughkeepsie-based project being developed by Clearwater, Columbia GSAPP architects and community organizers to transform a forgotten creek into a vital urban resource.  We will explore issues such as environmental justice (e.g. how economic inequality is related to the citys deteriorated environmental condition), urban design with nature, watershed management, and urban governance. Students will develop skills in conducting urban ethnography, while dealing directly with the local community, architects, environmental groups and city officials. Regular site visits (during regularly scheduled class time) are integral part of this course.  Required for EUS majors, although it is open to all students. Class size: 15

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These three graduate level courses are open by special arrangement to qualified undergraduates. Interested students must contact the Director of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy.

 

91748

CSP 511 Climate, Agriculture & Ecosystems

Jennifer Phillips

M . W . .

1:30 - 3:30 pm

HDR 101A

SSCI

This course covers fundamental processes in ecosystems and agriculture, then investigates the interactions between these systems and climate, emphasizing the two-way relationship between climate and food, fiber and fuel production. The course emphasizes greenhouse gas emissions and the possible roles of ecosystems and agriculture in mitigating climate change via greenhouse gas uptake and surface albedo modifications. Students end the yearlong course with a firm understanding of both the theoretical foundations of agro-ecosystem-climate interactions and the applied policy context of carbon markets, offsets, and adaptation measures. Class lectures are complemented by field trips to experimental forests and farms. Prerequisites:

Preference to seniors. Calculus I and permission of the Director of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, Dr. Eban Goodstein (ebangood@bard.edu

 

91749

CSP 513 Climate Science

Ed Mathez

. T . . .

1:00 -4:30 pm

HDR 101A

SSCI

This course begins with studies of Earths climate system and how it works across a range of scales of time and space. These include investigations of the circulations of the ocean and atmosphere and their dynamic interactions (e.g., ENSO, monsoons, NAO); of the carbon and other biogeochemical cycles; of radiation balance, the greenhouse effect, and other factors that force climate to change; and of feedbacks in the climate system. Students will further explore past climates and how they give us insight into our present predicament, 20th 21st century climate change and its effects, how climate may change in the future, and how to understand the risks imposed by this change. Prerequisites: Preference to seniors. Calculus I and permission of the Director of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, Dr. Eban Goodstein (ebangood@bard.edu

 

91750

CSP 515 Climate Policy and Law I

Monique Segarra

. . . Th .

1:30 - 3:30 pm

RKC 111

SSCI

This course focuses on the legal, political, cultural, and ethical dimensions of the climate policy-making process. It provides an overview of basic concepts of environmental law, politics, and policy making, for a detailed analysis of U.S. and international climate law and policy. Students evaluate climate change responses that include incentive-based regulatory approaches (cap-and-trade and cap-and-dividend systems with offsets; carbon taxes), command and control approaches, direct promotion of clean technology through regulation and subsidy, and voluntary agreements. Students examine critical issues of monitoring and enforcement, climate equity, and climate federalism, as well as the relationships among local, state, federal, and international policy. Prerequisites: Preference to Seniors. Permission of the Director of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, Dr. Eban Goodstein (ebangood@bard.edu

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91344

ANTH 101 A Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Yuka Suzuki

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 202

SSCI/DIFF

 

91346

ANTH 101 B Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Yuka Suzuki

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

HEG 308

SSCI/DIFF

 

91699

ANTH 111 Archaeological Field Methods

Christopher Lindner

. . . . F

11:50 -4:30 pm

ROSE 108

SCI

 

91345

ANTH 337 Cultural Politics of Animals

Yuka Suzuki

. . W . .

10:10 - 12:30 pm

RKC 200

SSCI/DIFF

 

91517

ARTH 125 Modern Architecture

Noah Chasin

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

RKC 102

AART

 

91523

ARTH 227 Roman Urbanism

Diana Minsky

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:00 pm

OLIN 102

AART

 

91518

ARTH 259 Sustainable Urbanism

Noah Chasin

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

RKC 102

AART

 

91519

ARTH 378 Contemporary Issues in Architecture and Urban Theory

Noah Chasin

. . . . F

10:10 - 12:30 pm

FISHER ANNE

AART

 

91463

BIO 130 Field Study in Natural History

William Maple

. T . Th .

1:30 -5:00 pm

RKC 114

SCI

 

91721

BIO 144 Biostatistics

Philip Johns

LAB:

. . W . F

. . . Th .

11:50 1:10 pm

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 112

RKC 112

SCI

 

91682

BIO 202B Ecology and Evolution

Bruce Robertson

. . W . .

. . . . F

8:30 - 11:30 am

9:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 114 / 115

RKC 114 / 115

SCI

 

91469

BIO 306 Vertebrate Zoology

William Maple

Lab:

. T . Th

. . . . F.

10:10 - 11:30 am

1:30 -4:30 pm

RKC 101

RKC 114

SCI

 

91367

ECON 100 A Principles of Economics

Olivier Giovannoni

. . W . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLINLC 115

SSCI

 

91368

ECON 100 B Principles of Economics

Aniruddha Mitra

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 309

SSCI

 

91369

ECON 100 C Principles of Economics

Aniruddha Mitra

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 204

SSCI

 

91348

ECON 101 Introduction to Microeconomics

Sanjaya DeSilva

. . W . F

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLINLC 115

SSCI

 

91366

ECON 102 Introduction to Macroeconomics

Olivier Giovannoni

. . W . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

ALBEE 106

SSCI

 

91360

ECON 221 Economic Development

Sanjaya DeSilva

. . W . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

ALBEE 106

SSCI

 

91318

HIST 2126 African Americans and US Cities

Myra Armstead

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 201

HIST

 

91339

HIST 2302 Shanghai and Hong Kong: Chinas Global Cities

Robert Culp

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 205

HIST

 

91319

HIST 232 American Urban History

Myra Armstead

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 204

HIST

 

91329

HIST 280A American Environmental

History I

Mark Lytle

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 201

HIST

 

91328

HIST 301 The Age of the Roosevelts

Mark Lytle

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 310

 

 

92006

HIST 3236 The History of American Horticulture for Non-Gardeners

Myra Armstead

M . . . .

3:10 -5:30 pm

OLIN 309

HIST

 

91712

LIT 2191 Modern Metropolis Tokyo: Literature, Media & Urban Space

Nathan Shockey

M . W . .

1:30 2:50 pm

HEG 201

FLLC

 

91284

LIT 2311 St. Petersburg: City, Monument, Text

Olga Voronina

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 202

FLLC

 

91714

PHYS 124 Climate Change

Gidon Eshel

Lab A:

Lab B:

M . W .

. T . . .

. T . . .

11:50 - 1:10 pm

10:00 12:00 pm

1:00 3:00 pm

RKC 111

Albee 100

Albee 100

SCI

91391

PS 288 Water, Power & Politics

Sanjib Baruah

M . W . .

8:30 -9:50 am

OLIN 205

SSCI

 

91298

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Allison McKim

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 202

SSCI

 

91293

SOC 205 Introduction to Research Methods

Yuval Elmelech

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

HDRANX 106

MATC

 

91600

WRIT 236 In the Wild: Writing

the Natural World

Susan Rogers

. T . . .

. . . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

8:30 - 11:30 am

HEG 200

Field Station

PART