91387

PS 104   International Relations

Michelle Murray

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

HEG 106

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies,  Human Rights   This course will focus on the major theories and concepts in international relations.  We will start the semester looking at the major schools of international relations theory:  realism, liberalism, and constructivism.  What are the implications of these theories for foreign policy decision making (and for the future of the world!)?  The course will also look at international organizations, including the UN and WTO, and how foreign policy is carried out.  We will end the semester by looking at some of the “hot” issues in the world today including: terrorism, preventive war, the rise of China, and the spread of democracy. The goal of the class is to see how (or if) theories of international relations can explain how organizations function and how foreign policy is made and to see what answers theory can provide for how to deal with the problems of a “post 9/11 world.”  Authors to be read include: Thucydides, Morgenthau, Russett, Huntington, and Mearsheimer, among many others.  Class size: 22

 

91498

PS 105   Comparative Politics

Omar Encarnacion

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 308

SSCI

(PS core course)   Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies   The basic intellectual premise of comparative politics is that we can better understand the politics of any country by placing it within a broader, global context.  This comparative “method” allows us to address some of the most fundamental questions in the study of politics, such as what makes democracy possible, how is political representation organized around the world, and why some nations are more successful than others at generating wealth and prosperity, while contributing to the building of theories about the nature and evolution of states, interest groups, civil society, and the dynamics of political processes such as revolution, modernization, and democratization.  Class lectures and discussions will cover developed and developing states, as well as democratic and non-democratic ones.  Class size: 18

 

91388

PS 109   Political Economy

Sanjib Baruah

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

ASP 302

SSCI

(PS core course)   Cross-listed:  Global & Int’l Studies   The term Political Economy refers to the interrelationship between politics and economics. However, political scientists and economists do not always use the term in the same sense. Even within these two disciplines the term has multiple meanings. The course will review the ideas of a few major thinkers such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Karl Polanyi, Thorstein Veblen, John Maynard Keynes, and John Kenneth Galbraith, and will introduce students to two subfields in particular: international political economy and the political economy of development. Among the questions we would ask are: Why are some countries rich and others poor? What is development? What are the prime movers of globalization? Is the US an empire given its influence and power in the global economy? How can development be redefined to tackle the challenge of climate change? Among issues that we will look at closely is the role of organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization in managing the global economy and the current debates about reforming these institutions. Class size: 22

 

91389

PS 122   American Politics: Issues

and Institutions

Verity Smith

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

ALBEE 106

SSCI

Cross-listed: American Studies, Social Policy   This course introduces students to the basic institutions and processes of American government. The class is meant to provide students with a grasp of the fundamental dynamics of American politics and the skills to be an effective participant in and critic of the political process. During the semester, we will examine how the government works, interpret current political developments and debates, and consider how to influence the government at various levels.  Class size: 20

 

91390

PS 134   Constitutional Law

Roger Berkowitz

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 201

SSCI

Cross-listed: Philosophy, Human Rights (core course)  This course provides an introduction to constitutional legal systems including but not limited to the United States.  Class size: 22

 

91391

PS 214   US-Latin American Relations

Omar Encarnacion

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

OLIN 305

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies;  LAIS  Despite common origins as off springs of European colonialism and close economic and political ties during their respective period of independence and state-building, conflict rests at the heart of the relationship between the United States and the nations of Latin America.  This course unpacks the historical and ideological roots of that conflict, how it has developed over the course of the years, and what possibilities exist for its resolution in the future.  The course is divided into three main sections.  The first one covers the years between the Spanish-American War of 1898 and the events leading to World War II.  It emphasizes U.S. attempts at creating a "sphere of influence" over Latin America, highlighted by numerous military interventions in places like Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, as well as Latin American responses to what they perceived to be an American project of imperialism.  The second section focuses on the dynamics of the Cold War as played out throughout Latin America.  It emphasizes the real and perceived fears by U.S. policy-makers about the advent of Marxist-inspired revolutions in Latin America, which led to interventions in Cuba, Chile, and Guatemala, among other nations, and the high toll that the Cold War exacted upon the peoples of Latin America.  The third and final section looks at the most salient issues in contemporary U.S-L.A. relations: economic integration, the illicit drug trade, and Latin American migration to the United States. Class size: 20

 

91396

PS 229   Immigration, Citizenship

and the State

Ken Haig

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 203

SSCI

As migration has become an increasingly global phenomenon, more and more immigrant-receiving countries around the world find themselves embroiled in the same debates over immigration and its consequences. In this class we examine how and why political conflicts over immigration arise and are played out in sometimes similar, sometimes dissimilar ways across different national settings. We start with the United States but then look for parallels and comparative reference elsewhere, including the leading immigrant-receiving democracies in Europe and East Asia. In each case, we first consider political debates around immigrants’ entry, from border control and admissions policies—e.g. visa quotas/categories and their determinants, the regulation of undocumented migration, the acceptance of asylum seekers—to concerns over immigrants’ perceived impact on jobs, taxes, and public services. We then consider the politics around immigrants’ membership and belonging, including policies concerning immigrants’ political, social, and cultural integration, and questions of multiculturalism and assimilation. The aim of this course is not to weigh in on any side of any particular debate, but to give students the analytical tools with which to compare and contrast the relevant issues, actors, political institutions, and political processes that form the basis of immigration-related policy debates in a variety of different national contexts.  Class size: 22

 

91392

PS 233   International Politics of South Asia

Sanjib Baruah

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 307

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies, Global & Int’l Studies   There has been significant international interest in South Asia in recent years largely due to the threat of terrorism and nuclearization, and perhaps the emergence of India as the leading outsourcing destination for western companies. Of course, there are many other reasons to be interested in this region of 1.4 billion people. South Asia consists of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. The region has twenty one percent of the world’s population. We will begin by trying to understand South Asia historically, focusing on the British colonial period. India, Pakistan and Bangladesh were part of “British India.”   A number of the other countries were protectorates and buffer states in the “frontier system” of the British Empire.  After the historical overview, we will move on to topics such as the Kashmir conflict, the war in Afghanistan, India-Pakistan Relations and the regional nuclear arms race, the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation [SAARC], the politics of outsourcing, India-China relations and the border dispute, and the United States and South Asia.   Students will be expected to keep up with current developments and relevant policy debates by reading South Asian and US newspapers on-line. Class size: 20

 

91636

PS 239   United Nations and Model UN

Jonathan Becker

. . . . F

1:30 – 2:50 pm

OLIN 202

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies , Human Rights   1 credit* This is a year-long course,  divided into two parts. The first part will explore the history of the United Nations and will introduce students to its structure and principal aims. It will also focus on the role of specialized agencies and the ways in which alliances impact on the UN’s day-to-day operations. The second part of the course will focus on an assigned country (for each Model UN, each college is assigned a country to represent. It will entail a study of the country’s history, politics and economics and will conclude with the writing of ‘position papers’ that reflect that country’s approach to issues confronting the UN. In addition, there will be a public speaking component. Students taking the course will have the opportunity to participate in a Model United Nations. Students wishing to participate should e-mail jbecker@bard.edu with 1-2 paragraphs indicating why they would like to participate. *One credit per semester, two-credit course. Students must take both halves to obtain credit. Class size: 22

 

91393

PS 247   Introduction to American

Foreign Policy

Walter Mead

. . W . F

11:50 -1:10 pm

OLIN 310

HIST

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies This introduction to American foreign policy offers students a chronological and thematic overview of American foreign policy through the end of the Cold War.  The course examines the rise of a distinctive American foreign policy tradition marked by contentious democratic debate and the participation of many different voices and viewpoints in the formation and discussion of American foreign policy.  Students will see how foreign policy and domestic politics have been closely linked throughout American history and understand the ideological and interest-based politics that shaped the American foreign policy process over time. Interested students should contact Prof. Mead prior to registration.  (wmead@bard.edu) Class size: 20

 

91394

PS 248   East Asian Politics & Society

Ken Haig

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 201

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies, Global & Int’l Studies  This course offers an introduction to the contemporary politics of Japan, Korea, and greater China, focusing on a few major questions that comparative political scientists have posed about East Asia in general, rather than attempting comprehensive surveys of each country.  First, we look at the causes of social revolutions. Why did feudal China and Korea undergo radical social revolutions and civil wars while Japan industrialized and became a colonial power without any major social upheaval? Next we focus on the secret to East Asia’s rapid economic development, and how, after being surpassed and nearly colonized by Western powers in the 19th century, Japan, Korea, and China grew into some of the world’s most advanced industrial economies in the 20th century. What explains East Asia’s ‘success’? Was it just that the structural/cultural conditions were favorable, or was it a result of smart policy? Should credit go to domestic or international forces? Finally, we consider the slow growth of democracy and pluralism in East Asia. Are the challenges to democratization across the region—e.g., long histories of one-party government; close relationships between producers and policymakers; and the marginalization of opposition parties, labor and consumer groups, environmental advocates, women, and ethnic minorities—more similar than they are different? Has civil society developed differently in East Asia than in the rest of the industrialized world, and if so, are the causes more cultural or political?  Students will be expected to make comparisons across all three countries during class discussions and most course assignments, but will focus on one country in particular for their extended research papers.  Class size: 22

 

91353

PS 255   The Politics of Russia & the Soviet Successor States

Jonathan Becker

. T . Th .

11:50 -1:10 pm

RKC 101

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies ; Russian/Eurasian Studies   This course examines the monumental political, social and economic changes that have swept Russia since 1985. We will ask a number of inter-related questions: Why did Communism collapse? What political, economic, social and historical factors explain the relative difficulties of Russia’s post-Communist transition? Where is Putin’s Russia heading? What role did the United States play in the collapse of Communism and the apparent failure of Russia’s transition? In answering these questions we will examine political, social and economic structures, the mass media, legal systems, and societal attitudes. We explore the transformation of Russia not only through academic books and articles, but also through literature, film, and the speeches and writings of political figures. The course attempts to put the Russian transformation in perspective through a selective examination of changes in neighboring countries, including Ukraine, Belarus, Georgia, and the Baltic States. 

Class size: 22

 

91562

PS 281   Equality and American Democracy

Steven Mazie

M T .  . .

3:10 – 4:30 pm

OLIN 304

SSCI

Cross-listed:  Human Rights  We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…”   U.S. Declaration of Independence       
“Equality is not given us, but is the result of human organization insofar as it is guided by the principle of justice.  We are not born equal; we become equal…”   Hannah Arendt
In the United States, one-tenth of the population owns 71% of the nation’s wealth; the bottom 40% has less than 1%.  The New York City school-age population is over 70 percent African American or Hispanic; at Stuyvesant High School, one of the city’s best, less than 4 percent of the students come from these groups.  On average, American women earn 77 cents for every dollar men earn in comparable jobs.  How should we regard these and other inequalities?  Are they objectionable?  Tolerable?  On what grounds?  What should be done about them, if anything?  This course explores several philosophical theories of egalitarianism and applies them to American case studies in inequality on the local and national levels.  Students will gain new tools for navigating debates over affirmative action, gender discrimination, income inequality, tax policy and other pressing controversies.  Readings include legal materials and works by Scanlon, Rawls, Parfit, Burke, Hayek, Anderson, Okin and Pogge, among others. Class size: 18

 

91397

PS 354   The Anglo-American Grand Strategy

Walter Mead

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 305

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies The American world system that exists today can be seen as version 2.0 of the liberal capitalist world system first built by Great Britain.  Both the British and the American builders of these systems developed a distinct style of strategic thought around the needs of a maritime, global and commercial system.  Students will read works by important thinkers in this strategic tradition like Admiral Mahan and Winston Churchill; they will also study the grand strategies of these powers in the series of wars from the War of the Spanish Succession through the Cold War and analyze contemporary American policy in the light of the three centuries of Anglophone world power. Class size: 15

 

91386

PHIL 354   Philosophical Issues of War

Alan Sussman

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

HEG 300

HUM

See Philosophy section for description.

 

91399

PS 369   Great Power Politics

Michelle Murray

M . . . .

3:10 -5:30 pm

OLIN 307

SSCI

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies This course explores the military, economic and social sources of great power competition in international politics. We will begin by examining the how the major theoretical paradigms of international relations explain patterns of cooperation and conflict among great powers.  We will then evaluate these perspectives in light of the historical record to illustrate the dynamics of interaction between great powers under different political conditions.  Historical cases covered include:  the rise of US hegemony in the Western Hemisphere, the Anglo-German naval race, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War.  Contemporary topics include the emergence of new nuclear powers, the United States' war on terror, and the rise of China.  The objective of the course is to gain a better understanding of the relevance of great power politics to international order, as well as to learn the art of using historical research in international relations.  Class size: 15

 

91395

PS 370   The Politics of Population Control

Ken Haig

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 306

SSCI

Cross-listed: Asian Studies; Environmental & Urban Studies; Global & Int’l Studies; Human Rights; Social Policy; Related interest: STS  For much of history, rulers saw having large populations as the key to military and economic strength.  After the introduction of Malthusian theory, however, overpopulation came to be seen as a threat to resource management, as well as social and political stability. As a result, developing powers like China and India have actively pursued population control as a part of their development strategies, even over concerns about female infanticide or the cost to the human rights of their citizens. Meanwhile, for an increasing number of advanced industrial societies, the problem is the opposite. Facing demographic crises, policymakers in countries from Western Europe to East Asia are experimenting with policies aimed at stemming or reversing declining fertility and aging population trends. But these policies have created their own controversies, leading to debates over the state’s role in regulating mortality, fertility, and migration. After looking at the various theories and social scientific approaches that have historically informed state responses to population change, we consider the range of population-controlling or population-growing policy solutions attempted across different national settings and the political controversies they have prompted.  Class size: 15

 

91398

PS 420   Hannah Arendt Seminar

Roger Berkowitz

. T . . .

4:40 -7:10 pm

DUBOIS

HUM

Cross-listed: Philosophy; Human Rights This course is dedicated to reading some of Hannah Arendt's seminal works with a particular focus on her thinking about science and art as these two human activities relate to the human condition. In addition to close readings of some of Arendt’s most important books and essays, we will also explore the challenge that scientific rationality and artificial intelligence pose to the humanity of humans. In conjunction with the 2011 Arendt Center Conference on “Truthtelling: Democracy in an Age Without Facts,” we will ask how Arendt’s work helps us to think about the ways that truth can be told at a time when fact and opinion have lost their distinction. In addition to Bard undergraduates, the participants will include visiting fellows from the Hannah Arendt Center for Ethical and Political Thinking. The course is also open to select students from the Center for Curatorial Studies (CCS). Beyond scheduled class meetings, students are expected to attend lectures and other events sponsored by the Arendt Center and CCS. Class size: 15