91199

PHYS 118 A  Light and Color

TBA

M . W . .

1:30 -3:30 pm

ROSE 108

SCI

An introduction to light, optical phenomena, and related devices, including some historical perspective; classical and modern models of light; light and color in nature, and vision; the geometrical optics of lenses, mirrors, and related devices; the physical optics of interference and diffraction; spectroscopy and polarization; lasers, and holography. Without assuming either prior knowledge of physics or heavier mathematics, we will develop models and explore them in intermixed lecture -discussion and experiment-demonstration modes.  Class size: 24

 

91200

PHYS 118 B  Light and Color

TBA

. T . Th .

1:30 -3:30 pm

ROSE 108

SCI

See above.  Class size: 24

 

91561

PHYS 124  Climate Change

Gidon Eshel

                     Lab:

M . W .  .

M . W .  .

3:10 -  4:30 pm

12:00 – 2:00 pm

RKC 103

Albee 100

SCI

Cross-listed:  Environmental & Urban Studies  This lab course explores the physical principles underlying climate and anthropogenic climate change. We will start with a survey of the most compelling lines of evidence for climate change, how they are obtained/derived and some of their limitations. We will then discuss in some depth idealized one-dimensional planetary radiative and thermal balance, first in the absence of an atmosphere, and then in the presence of a radiatively active one, with variable number of layers. In this context, it will become interesting to explore atmospheric opacity with respect to various radiative types, and what natural and anthropogenic effects affect this opacity. A related topic will be natural feedbacks, such as water vapor and could feedbacks. We will next place current (modern) observations of climate change in the broader context of past climates, emphasizing the last couple millennia, hundreds of millennia, and finally the ten million-year scale geological record. We will conclude the course with some discussion about the objective of a successful policy mitigation efforts, and their implementation obstacles. While not technical per se, participation in this course does require the ability to solve a couple of linear algebraic equations (like solving x + 4 = 2y and 2x - 3y = 6 for x and y) and to perform some very basic manipulation of data and plot the results (using, e.g., Microsoft's Excel).

 

91201

PHYS 141   Introduction to Physics I

Matthew Deady

                    Lab A:

                    Lab B:

                    Lab C:

M . W . F

M . . . .

. T . . .

. T . . .

8:30 -9:50 am

1:00 -3:00 pm

1:00 -3:00 pm

3:10 -5:10 pm

HEG 102

HEG 107

HEG 107

HEG 107

SCI

A calculus-based survey of Physics.  This first semester covers topics in mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, and wave motion.  The course stresses ideas--the unifying principles and characteristic models of physics.  Labs develop the crucial ability to elicit understanding of the physical world. Corequisite: MATH 141.  This course has three Lab options. Class size: 40

 

91202

PHYS 221   Mathematical Methods I

Matthew Deady

. . . . F

1:00 -2:50 pm

HEG 106

MATC

(2 credits)  This course presents methods of mathematics that are useful in the physical sciences.  While some proofs and demonstrations are given, the emphasis is on the applications.  This semester’s topics include: power series, probability and statistics, multi-variable differentiation and integration, and curvilinear coordinate systems. Prerequisites:  MATH 141-142, or equivalent. Class size: 15

 

91221

PHYS 241   Modern Physics

Matthew Deady

                    Lab:

. . W . F

M . . . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

3:10 -4:30 pm

HEG 106

SCI

A topical course in the development of modern physics from the theory of relativity to quantum mechanics. Relativity, photoelectric effect, X‑ray production and scattering, nuclear transmutation, alpha and beta radiation processes, particles and quasiparticles.  Prerequisites: Physics 141‑142, Mathematics 141-142. Class size: 20

 

91203

PHYS 314   Thermal Physics

Peter Skiff

. . W . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

HEG 201

SCI

This course studies the thermal behavior of physical systems,  employing thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and statistical mechanics.  Thermodynamical topics include equations of state, energy and entropy,  and the first and second laws of thermodynamics.  Both classical and  quantum statistical mechanics are covered, including distribution  functions, partition functions, and the quantum statistics of  Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein systems. Applications include atoms,  molecules, gases, liquids, solids, and phase transitions. Prerequisites: Physics 141-142, Mathematics 141-142.

Class size: 15