By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

 

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

 

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble, one or two credits may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

 

91504

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Teresa Cheung

M . . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

FISHER PAC

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held on Monday September 5th, 2011 from 6:00 pm until 7:30pm for new members. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7091. * First Orchestra rehearsal will be on Monday September 12th, 2011 from 7:30 pm until 10:00 pm in Sosnoff Theatre. * (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.) Class size: 30

 

91505

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

First rehearsal will be on Tuesday September 6th, 2011.  Class size: 30

 

91506

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

TBA

TBA

.

PART

Class size: 20

 

91507

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Blair McMillen

TBA

TBA

.

PART

Class size: 20

 

91508

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits. Auditions will be held by appointment for new members on Tuesday August 30th, 2011.  First rehearsal will be on Thursday September 1st, 2011.

Class size: 35

 

91511

MUS 108F   Ensemble: Jazz Big Band

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 16

 

91512

MUS 108H   Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Mercedes Dujunco

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

.

PART

Class size: 22

 

91513

MUS 108I   Ensemble: Electro-Acoustic

Marina Rosenfeld /

Zeena Parkins

. T . . .

4:40 – 6:40 pm

BLM N 110

PART

Class size: 14

 

91514

MUS 108J   Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

Class size: 14

 

91515

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composer’s works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting.  Class size: 10

 

Music Courses

 

91516

MUS 119   Sound + Culture

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N210

 

This course explores the various ways auditive phenomena (sound, silence, noise, music) are conceived, produced, perceived, and organized by humans into meaningful (and often musical) forms and events. Beginning with basic concepts in the physical acoustics of sound (both pitched and unpitched), we will then discuss how the ear functions and humans hear and perceive sound;  the relationship and interaction of sounds with the environment (soundscapes); the musicalization of natural and man-made sounds; the social and cultural foundations of music (ideas about music and how these are manifested in certain musical practices); music’s transformative and persuasive power such as its use in advertising, propaganda, and as “sonic wallpaper”; culminating in case studies of music from three different regions of the students’ choice (e.g. the musics of aboriginal Australia; Tuva; Japan, etc.). Our ultimate goal is to develop a broader concept and sense of what is music and musical and thereby enable students to appreciate today’s rapidly evolving soundscape of mediated and multicultural musics. From time to time, we will have faculty from within and outside the College come in as guest speakers to talk on topics relevant to the course. Requirements will include a few short written assignments and a midterm and a final exam. This fulfills music history requirements. Maximum class size: 20

 

91517

MUS 142   Easy Listening: Western Art

Music for non-specialists

Frederick Hammond

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 104

AART

This course is intended to provide all students with a basic repertory of music in the Western art tradition.  We will cover the major composers and genres from ca. 1600 to the end of the twentieth century, including Monteverdi, Bach, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner, Verdi, Brahms, Schoenberg, and Stravinsky, whose works will be presented in a larger historical context.  No specialized training or knowledge is required.  This course does not count toward a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

91518

MUS 169   Listening to String Quartets:

Haydn through Shostakovich

Marka Gustavsson

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Many composers of notated concert-music reserved the form of the String Quartet for their most profound and unusual utterances.  This course will pursue an aural exploration of the expressive, conversational music in this genre, from Haydn, the innovator through Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, German Romanticism, European Nationalism, the Second Viennese School, up to and including American and European Modernism.  In addition to developing tools for listening to this complex polyphonic texture, through classroom experience with recordings, and attending concerts, we will read composers’ letters (Beethoven’s Heiligenstadt testament), literary works that portray performers and composers (Tolstoy’s Kreutzer Sonata, Vikram Seth’s An Equal Music), and selections from works by active, internationally recognized performers of chamber music (Steinhardt’s Indivisible by Four, Dubinsky’s Stormy Applause.)  Assignments will include two papers (5-6 pp), one concert review, informal writing in class, and a final presentation.  Knowledge of music notation is not required. This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 20

 

91519

MUS 171   Jazz Harmony

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  This course will include acquisitions of the basic skills that make up the foundation of all Jazz styles. We will also study the Jazz language from ragtime to the swing era. This fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.   Class size: 20

 

91520

MUS 201   Music Theory I

Kyle Gann /

Erika Switzer

. T W Th F

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course serves as an introduction to music theory and music making, and is the entry-level course to the classical theory sequence. Basics of musical notation will be the starting point, after which we will move quickly to scales and recognition of triads and seventh chords, as well as rhythmic performance. At all times the course will emphasize analysis of real music, and an ear-training component will reinforce the theoretical knowledge with practical experience. There are no prerequisites; the course serves as prerequisite for Music Theory II and all high-level theory courses. This fulfills theory requirements. (Prof. Gann will teach Theory sections on Wed/Fri, Prof. Switzer will teach Ear Training sections on Tues/Thurs.) Class size: 25

 

91521

MUS 212   Jazz Literature II

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies We will study the words of Gary Gidden “Visions in Jazz” and Robert Gottlieb from his book entitled “Reading Jazz” in order to bring attention to some important literature on Jazz. Some of the writers look beyond Jazz as an art form, but also bring attention to the historical influence on culture, race, tradition and our social experience.  Writers like Albert Murry, Ralph Ellison, Eudora Welty. There is an attempt in their works to illuminate the significance of the musical potential the musicians inherit and the creative option they exercise.  This course includes the words of many who have been hailed as Jazz Greatest Musicians.  This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 16

 

91522

MUS 219   19th Century Harmony

Kyle Gann

. . W . F

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will explore the Romantic Era in terms of its most colorful characteristic: harmony. Works by Chopin, Field, Mendelssohn, Robert and Clara Schumann, Brahms, Liszt and Scriabin will be analyzed, along with excerpts of larger works by Berlioz, Wagner, Bruckner and Mahler – for form and orchestration, but most of all to explore the flowering of ultrachromatic harmonic progressions and modulations. Along with augmented sixth chords, borrowed chords, enharmonic modulations, and chromatic voice-leading, the class will study the wealth of thematic transformation techniques that made late Romanticism such a fluid and often extramusically referential language. This course is intended for music majors, but is open to anyone who has fulfilled the prerequisite, Fundamentals I and II or the equivalent. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. Class size: 22

 

91523

MUS 228   Renaissance Counterpoint

Kyle Gann

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N217

AART

The ancient musical technique of counterpoint seems of questionable relevance today.  And yet, its premise- that human attention is riveted when a unified impression is created via maximum variety- is a fertile psychological principle relevant to many fields.  Overall, this course will follow classical species counterpoint as outlined by the eminent Knud Jeppesen, based on the style of  Palestrina.  However, we will also examine the freer styles of earlier composers such as Josquin and Ockeghem, and generalize from contrapuntal concepts to such derivatives as the dissonant counterpoint of Charles Seeger and others.  The ability to read music,  and basic knowledge of musical terminology (intervals, cadences) are prerequisites.  This fulfills theory requirement for music majors.  Class size: 22

 

91524

MUS 229   The Faust Legend in Literature

and  Music

Frederick Hammond

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 104

AART

We will read the versions of the Faust Legend by Christopher Marlowe, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and Thomas Mann.  We will examine their musical realizations  by Schumann, Berlioz, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Gounod, Mahler, Arrigo, Boito, Feruccio Busoni, and Mann/Schoenberg.  No technical knowledge of music is required.

This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.  Class size: 15

 

91578

MUS 254A   Pronunciation & Diction for Singers I

Erika Switzer

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BARD HALL

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the Italian and French languages, the spring to German, English, and Latin.  Through songs, arias, and choral literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series of quizzes and two exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required.    Class size: 15

 

91525

MUS 264   Literature and  Language

of Music I

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

 A survey of selected musical works composed from Gregorian chant in the Middle Ages to the early works of Beethoven around 1800.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students take the second semester, which will survey music from Beethoven to the present day.   Class size: 22

 

91526

MUS 266A   American Popular Song

(1900-1929)

John Esposito

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N211

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies   This performance-based course is a survey of the major American popular song composers of the Tin Pan Alley era, whose work forms the core of the jazz repertoire. Composers studied will include Gershwin, Berlin, Porter, Ellington, Warren, Rodgers, and others. The course will include readings, recorded music, and films. The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony II or permission of the instructor. This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 15

 

91527

MUS 266D   Jazz Repertory: 

The Music of John Coltrane

John Esposito

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

AART

An immersion in the music of a Jazz master; includes readings, recorded music and films.  Coltrane’s music will be performed in a workshop setting by students and instructor.  Visiting artists will play and discuss the music. Prerequisites: Jazz Harmony II, or permission of Instructor. This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 10

 

91528

MUS 276   Introduction to Opera

Christopher Gibbs

M . W . .

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course surveys the history of opera from Monteverdi at the beginning of the seventeenth century to recent developments in performance art and musical theater.  The focus will be on a limited number of operas, including treatments of the Orpheus myth by Monteverdi and Gluck, Handel’s Giulio Cesare, Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Beethoven’s Fidelio,Wagner’s Die Walkure, Verdi’s La traviata, Berg’s Wozzeck, and Glass’s Satyagraha.  As many of the works to be examined have significant literary and dramatic sources, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which extraordinary works of the written and spoken word are transformed into compelling musical theater.  Classes will also include video screenings and comparisons of different productions.  It is not expected or required that students be able to read musical notation.  There will be quizzes, performance reviews, as well as brief writing assignments.  This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.   Class size: 22

 

91529

MUS 320   Musical Electronics: Analog Synthesis & Processing

Robert Bielecki

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course concentrates on the theory, design and creative use of the basic components found in Analog Electronic Music Systems. We will examine some of the original circuits used by Moog, Bode, Serge, Theremin and others. Discussions will include voltage control techniques, synthesis and processing. As class projects, we will recreate some of the classic circuits and patches. Enrollment limited. This fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors. Class size: 10

 

91745

MUS 327   Introduction to Electronic Music

Marina Rosenfeld /

TBA

. T  . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus primarily on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog recording techniques and devices. Foundational practices in electro- acoustic sound production will be explored alongside their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on digital signal processing, instrument "discovery" and exploration, field   recording, and modes of electronic diffusion, including multichannel installation, performance, and multimedia. Students will be given instruction in the use of ProTools, Quicktime with Protools for soundtrack production, and will become familiar with sampling, multi- track recording, editing, and mixing. Throughout the semester, students will produce field recordings and other original recordings  in diary format and will receive instruction and guidance in utilizing  this work for electronic composition. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring the aesthetic, political, historical and personal implications of music technology and its uses. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios. Registration is by consent of the instructor.

 

91530

MUS 349   Jazz: Freedom Principle IV

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies  This Jazz History course which is part four of a four part course.  Part four is a study of Jazz after 1952 to the early 70’s.  The course will examine the extreme shifts in jazz styles from Cool, to Hard bop to the Arvant Garde.  Emphasis will be on musicians associated with these styles such as Stan Getz, Lee Konitz, Horace Silver, Hank Mobley, Anthony Braxton and Muhal Richard Abrams.  The course will discuss the solo and combo styles of these musicians.  The course employs a cultural approach designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music from 1952- 1972 and examine it’s effect on the music.  This will be illustrated with recordings and films.  The class requires oral presentation and critical listening.  This course is for juniors and seniors who have moderated into music.  This fulfills a music history requirement for music majors. Class size: 16

 

91531

MUS 352   Electronic, Electrocoustic & Computer Music Composition

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N110

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing work as computer programs, digital or analog recordings and scores for live electronic realization.  These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members.  Installations and mixed media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Xenakis, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor. This fulfills music theory requirement.  Class size: 10

 

91532

MUS 353   Orchestration

George Tsontakis

M . . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BLM N217

PART

Students will learn how to score for instrumental combinations beginning with small ensembles up to full orchestra. There will be live demonstrations of orchestral instruments, listening and score study of orchestral literature, chord voicing and notation of bowings, breathing, articulations, and special orchestral effects as well as practice of basic conducting patterns and skills. Prerequisites:  Fundamentals of Music and composition workshop. There will be a reading of the orchestrations by the Bard College Orchestra. Class size: 7

 

91533

MUS 367A   Jazz Composition I

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course explores the strategies of Jazz Composition including basic modal harmony, melodic and rhythmic development.  This fulfills a music theory  requirement for music majors.  Class size: 10

 

91534

MUS 379   Music of Debussy and Ravel

Peter Laki

. . . Th .

3:10 – 5:30 pm

BLM N210

AART

This course will be devoted to the works of the two great French composers in the context of their time.  We will study a broad selection of the two composers’ works, including piano and chamber music, as well as symphonic and stage works.  Topics will include an examination of their innovations in the areas of harmony and timbre; we will also explore their connections with literature and the visual arts.  Reading will include chapters from The Cambridge Companion to Debussy and The Cambridge Companion to Ravel.  Students will be expected to do individual research and write a substantial term paper by the end of the semester.  The course will fulfill a music history requirement for music majors.    Class size: 16

 

 

MUSIC WORKSHOPS: (2 credits)

 

91535

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

3:00 -5:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility. Class size: 18

 

91536

MUS WKSHB   Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart /

Blair McMillen

. T . Th .

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

4:40 -7:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students choose one of the three sessions.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.  Class size: 20

 

91537

MUS WKSHG   Workshop: Vocal & Voice

Arthur Burrows

. . W . .

10:10 - 12:10 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits In this singing class we explore the art songs of America, England, France and Germany, including some opera arias and ensembles depending on the make-up of the class. At the same time we learn the necessary technique to perform them successfully. Each class will be divided into two parts. The first will deal with vocal technique, and the second with technical issues that arise from individual performance. Requirements: the ability to match pitches, and an adequate vocal range. Pianists will be assigned individual singers to work with and coached in the various musical styles. Class size: 12

 

91538

MUS WKSHL   Workshop: Opera Workshop

Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Work is to be decided.  For more information see Prof. LoMonaco. Contact  Prof. LoMonaco by email: Ilka98@aol.com to arrange an audition before registration.  Class size: 20

 

91539

MUS WKSHN   "Hands-on" Music History

Patricia Spencer /

Peter Laki

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits Members of this class will explore our musical past by playing it!  Also improving sight reading, the course will  cover a sampling of chamber music from different eras.  Members will build familiarity with a wide variety of harmonies and musical styles (mostly European) from the Renaissance through the present.  Background readings and class discussion about the composers will provide historical context for the works being played. Parts and scores will be provided one week in advance for those who prefer to prepare their sight-reading.  Composers may include but are not limited to: Dufay, di Lasso, Sweelinck, Purcell, Frederick the Great, J.S. Bach and his sons, Vivaldi, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Dvorak, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Ravel, Copland, Cage, Carter, Rzewski and many more.  Works will not be rehearsed to a performance level, but may occasionally be repeated.   Class size: 20

 

91542

MUS WKSHV   Chinese Music Ensemble

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:00 pm

BLM 117

PART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies   2 credits.  A beginner's workshop for students interested in learning to play Chinese folk music through performance on instruments of the "silk and bamboo" (Chinese string and wind instruments) category. Students acquire basic skills on one of several instruments that may include the di (bamboo transverse flute), the erhu (2-stringed fiddle), zheng (21-string plucked board zither), yangqin (hammered dulcimer), pipa (short-necked pear-shaped plucked lute), and sanxian (long-necked 3-stringed plucked lute), with the goal of eventually playing together in ensemble.  Class size: 15

 

91540

MUS WKSP3   Workshop: Jazz

Improvisation I

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40 -7:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits This class serves as an introduction to jazz improvisation. It is intended for incoming jazz ensemble players who would like to develop as improvisers, or classical players who would like to explore improvisational techniques in a jazz framework. Open to First-Year Students.  Class size: 14

 

91541

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

John Esposito /

Pamelam Pentony

M . . . .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits Class size: 16

 

91543

MUS WKSPX   Music Software for Composition & Performance

Richard Teitelbaum / Miguel Frasconi

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

2 credits This workshop will explore popular software used in music today. The main focus will be on Ableton Live, both as a composing/performing tool and as a host for software instruments and audio plugins. Programs such as Kontakt, Absynth, Reason, and Reaktor will also be explored as well as the use of hardware controllers. Students will learn how to integrate audio processing with acoustic instruments, use audio clip s and re-sampling in an interactive environment, and mix finished compositions. Creative use of these techniques will be encouraged and the student's own work shared through weekly listening sessions and a final concert. Students should have their own copy of Ableton Live (LE or full version) or arrange regular access to the department's computers. Class size: 20

 

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS: Special Projects are designed for music majors only,  to pursue individual or group projects with a particular Professor.

 

91545

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91544

MUS PROJ JB  Special Projects

James Bagwell

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91548

MUS PROJ JT  Special Projects

Joan Tower

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91547

MUS PROJ KG  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91546

MUS PROJ LGR  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91549

MUS PROJ TB  Special Projects

Thurman Barker

. . . . .

 

.

PART