By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

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College & Community Ensembles

 

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credit may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

Scholarship auditions will be held on Wednesday September 8th, 2010.

 

91401

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Theresa Cheung

. T . . .

7:00 - 10:00 pm

FISH

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held on Monday August 30th, 2010 from 6:00 pm until 9:00pm for new members. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7131. * First Orchestra rehearsal will be on Wednesday September 1st, 2010 from 7:00 pm until 10:00 pm in Sosnoff Theatre. * (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.)

 

91001

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

First rehearsal will be on Tuesday September 7th, 2010.

 

91402

MUS 106   Bard College Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

TBA

 

.

PART

 

91403

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Joan Tower

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PART

 

91404

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits. Auditions will be held by appointment for new members.  First rehearsal will be on Thursday September 2nd, 2010.

 

91405

MUS 108H   Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Mercedes Dujunco

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

Olin 305

PART

 

91406

MUS 108I   Ensemble: Electro-Acoustic

Marina Rosenfeld

. T . . .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM N110

PART

 

91407

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:40 -6:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

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Music Courses

 

91408

MUS 122   Introduction to Music Theory

Blair McMillen

. . W . .

. . . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

11:50 -1:10 pm

BLM N217

BLM N211

AART

This course will serve as an introduction to reading, studying, and analyzing tonal music. Introduction to Music Theory is geared toward non-music majors as well as potential music majors who have had little or no exposure to reading music. We will begin with the basics of musical notation, progressing to the identification of scales, triads, and seventh chords. Enrollment limited to 18.

 

91409

MUS 141   The Operas of Mozart - 1756-1791

Frederick Hammond

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

OLIN 104

AART

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) is arguably the best-loved composer in the Western Classical tradition, and his operas are at the center of his achievement.  We will experience his seven major masterpieces-the Baroque grandeur of Idomeno, the sentimental romance of The Abduction from the Seraglio, the delirious complications of The Marriage of Figaro, the dark splendor (and comic touches) of Don Giovanni, the elegant wit of Cosi fan tutte, the enchantment of Magic Flute and Mozart’s final coronation opera, The Clemency of Titus. This course fulfills a Music History requirement for unmoderated Music Majors and is intended for the general music lover.    Online registration.

 

91410

MUS 171   Jazz Harmony I

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  This course will include acquisitions of the basic skills that make up the foundation of all Jazz styles. We will also study the Jazz language from ragtime to the swing era. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.   

 

91411

MUS 185   Introduction to

Ethnomusicology

Mercedes Dujunco

. . W . F

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Anthropology   Ethnomusicology is the study of music in context in relation to other aspects of culture (i.e. language, religion, politics, social organization, etc.). This course will introduce students to the history, scope of subject matter, theory, and methodology of the field of ethnomusicology. We will begin by examining how the ethnomusicological study of music developed in connection with the various nuanced understandings of what “culture” is over the latter half of the past century and music’s position within these different conceptual frameworks, roughly describable as “music in culture,” “music as culture” and, finally, “music-culture”. We then move on to the study of the main research methodologies borrowed from anthropology – ethnographic fieldwork and participant observation – and how these have been adapted to and eventually became hallmarks of ethnomusicological research. By nature, ethnomusicology is a field of growing data and competing theories and approaches, and students will have to not only absorb the contents of readings from the history and present publications of the field, but also consider, debate, and evaluate the statements and theories of others in terms of their own understandings and experiences of music, culminating in a medium-length written work at the end of the semester. The course therefore cannot be “taken” by passive observation, but has to be participated in through discussion, debate, and application of students’ own individual interests in order to serve its purpose.

 

91412

MUS 190   Death Set to Music

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will discuss and analyze a number of key musical works that use death and mourning as subject matter.  Works to be analyzed will include the Requiems of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Giuseppe Verdi, Johannes Brahms, Benjamin Britten and Paul Hindemith.  Other works will include Johann Sebastian Bach’s Johannes-Passion, and Ich habe genug (Cantata 82).  Evaluation will be based on two exams and a research paper.  This course fulfills a music history requirement for music majors.

 

91413

MUS 201   Music Theory I

Kyle Gann /

Sharon Bjorndal Lavery

M T . Th F

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course serves as an introduction to music theory and music making, and is the entry-level course to the classical theory sequence. Basics of musical notation will be the starting point, after which we will move quickly to scales and recognition of triads and seventh chords, as well as rhythmic performance. At all times the course will emphasize analysis of real music, and an ear-training component will reinforce the theoretical knowledge with practical experience. There are no prerequisites; the course serves as prerequisite for Music Theory II and all high-level theory courses. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.    

 

91414

MUS 226   Music of China

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N217

AART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies  This course will examine various forms of Chinese music, focusing in particular on instrumental genres.  The goal is to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of musical styles, concepts and recurring themes in Chinese music history.  Although the specific aim is not to present the history of Chinese music per se, the topical organization of the course will follow a more or less chronological order as attention is drawn to certain issues and prominent characteristics of music and musical life in China from the ancient times to the present.  Material will be drawn from lecture-discussions, assigned readings, listening and viewing assignments, and performance demonstrations by guest artists.  This course can be used to fulfill a music history elective for music majors. 

 

91415

MUS 234   Analyzing Beethoven

Kyle Gann

. . W . F

3:10 -4:30 pm

BLM N217

AART

Contrary to his public image, Beethoven wasn’t really more experimental than his predecessors Haydn and Mozart; rather, he accepted his inherited forms, but vastly increased the range of drama and dynamic contrast inherent in sonata form.  In so doing he arrived at music so logical that it can sometimes be memorized after a reading or two, and created archetypes for musical expression that dominated Europe for a century and continue to resonate today.  This analysis course will follow the development of Beethoven’s formal ideas, leading up to a detailed examination of the astonishing late  piano sonatas and string quartets, still considered by some the most “avant-garde” music ever written, in which he seemed to try to synthesize the entire Classical era by superimposing sonata form, variation form, and fugue all at once.  Our examination of  sonata form will be based on the latest musicological views as propounded in William E. Caplin’s Classical Form (1998), and we will also read literature relevant to the public image of Beethoven’s late music, such as Thomas Mann’s Doctor Faustus, and Rose Rosengard Subotnick’s “Adorno’s Analysis of Beethoven’s Late Style:  Early Symptom  of a Fatal Condition.”  Prerequisites: Theory I and II (formally Fundamentals I and II) or the equivalent (familiarity with Roman numeral analysis, secondary dominants, and augmented sixth chords).  The course fulfils a theory requirement for music majors.

 

91317

MUS / ITAL 251   The Novel and the Opera: Manzoni’s Betrothed and Verdi’s Operas

Frederick Hammond

M . W . .

10:10 – 11:30 am

Olin 104

FLLC

See Italian Section for description.

 

91416

MUS 254A   Pronunciation and Diction

for Singers I

Sharon Bjorndal Lavery

. T . Th .

10:10 – 11:30 am

BDH

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the Italian and French languages, the spring to German, English, and Latin.  Through songs, arias, and choral literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series of quizzes and two exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required.    

 

91417

MUS 257   Production & Reproduction

Robert Bielecki

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N110

PART

This course will focus on the theory and practice of sound recording. Students will learn the use of recording equipment including digital tape recorders, mixing consoles, signal processing devices, and microphones. A/B listening tests will be used to compare types of microphones, microphone placement and many different recording techniques. ProTools software will be available for digital editing and mastering to CD. Assigned projects will include both multitrack and direct to stereo recordings of studio and concert performances. Enrollment is limited. 

 

91418

MUS 264   Literature and Language

of Music I

Peter Laki

M . W . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed from Gregorian chant in the Middle Ages to the early works of Beethoven around 1800.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students take the second semester, which will survey music from Beethoven to the present day.    

 

91563

MUS 266C  Jazz Repertory:Masters of

Be-Bop

John Esposito

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

This performance based course is a survey of the principal composers and performers of the BEBOP Era.  Musicians included are Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro, Bud Powell, Max Roach and others.  The course will include readings, recorded music and films.  The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony I or permission of instructor. This can be taken as a companion course with Jazz Harmony II.   

 

91420

MUS 339   Twelve Tone Analysis

Kyle Gann

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BLM N210

AART

Dominating the central 20th Century, 12-tone music was a bold experiment in coming up with a consistent musical language to replace tonality, which seemed threadbare and superceded. The technique of the 12-tone row was invented by Arnold Schoenberg in 1921, and won only a few adherents until after World War II, when it spread internationally like wildfire, determining much of what was taken seriously in music until the late 1980s, at which point it fell rapidly out of favor. Though it failed as a universal language, 12-tone technique sparked dazzling innovations in musical texture, and in the right hands was capable of producing a thoughtful, counterintuitive beauty. The technique also generated its own style of pitch-set analysis, applicable to other styles of music as well. This seminar will examine 12-tone works by Schoenberg, Webern, Berg, Dallapiccola, Stockhausen, Boulez, Berio, Rochberg, Sessions, Babbitt, and others, to see how the technique refined itself and spread into areas of rhythm, dynamics, and form – and how, in so doing, it eventually sowed the seeds of its own demise. Intended as a theory course for upper-level music majors, or all those who have mastered the principles of first-year music theory and harmonic analysis.

 

91421

MUS 343   Happy Endings:Comic Opera

Christopher Gibbs

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

This course will explore comic operas – a genre that has proved a relative rarity among the greatest composers of the standard operatic repertoire. (Most famous operas end with lots of dead bodies and tears.) We will begin by looking at the genre in relation to traditional theories of comedy from Aristotle to Freud, Bergson, and beyond. We will explore the issue of humor and wit in music generally. The course will ultimately focus on a limited number of operas, including Pergolesi’s La serva padrona (1733), Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro (1784) and The Magic Flute (1791), Rossini’s The Barber of Seville (1816), Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg (1868), Verdi’s Falstaff (1893), Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi (1918), and Stravinksky The Rake’s Progress (1951). For each work we will consider the musical and literary sources (among the Beaumarchais, Shakespeare, and Dante), genesis, reception, and production history. Students will be expected to study the featured works thoroughly, give a seminar presentation, and write a final research paper on a relevant topic of their choosing. The ability to read music is not required. This course counts toward the music history requirement in the music program.

 

91422

MUS 352   Electronic, Electroacoustic & Computer Music Composition

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N110

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing work as computer programs, digital or analog recordings and scores for live electronic realization.  These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members.  Installations and mixed media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Xenakis, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor.

 

91423

MUS 356A   Arranging Techniques

for Jazz I

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

 

This composition class will focus on the various techniques used in jazz ensemble writing from trio to quintet ensembles with heavy emphasis on rhythm section arranging.  Final projects will be recorded or performed live at the end of the semester.  This is an advanced seminar class for moderated music majors.  Prerequisite are Jazz Composition I and II or the permission of the instructor.  Class size  limited.

 

91424

MUS 366C   Advanced Contemporary Jazz Technique III

John Esposito

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

 

This course will focus on strategies for improvisation without predetermined chord structures or rhythmic frameworks and on methods for shaping performances spontaneously.  We will also explore collaboration with artists from other disciplines such as dance, spoken word and visual arts. This class is open to moderated upper college students who have successfully completed advanced contemporary Jazz techniques A & B.

 

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Music Workshops

 

91425

MUS WKSHA   Workshop: Composition for Performers and Composers

Joan Tower

M . . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should email Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility.

 

91426

MUS WKSHB   Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart /

Blair McMillen

. T .  .  .

. . W . .

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

4:40 -7:00 pm

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration.  Students choose one of the three sessions.  Students must contact Prof. Garcia-Renart  by phone (x6147) or in person (Blum 201)  prior to on-line registration.

 

91427

MUS WKSHG   Workshop: Vocal & Voice

Arthur Burrows

. . W . .

10:10 - 12:10 pm

BDH

PART

Music of Stephen Foster, Cole Porter, George Gershwin & Leonard Bernstein

 

91428

MUS WKSHL   Workshop: Opera Workshop

Rufus Muller /

 Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits   Work is to be decided.  For more information see Professor Muller.   Contact  Prof. Müller by email: rumu2000@earthlink.net to arrange an audition before registration.

 

91429

MUS WKSHM   Les Liaisons Dangereuses

Rufus Muller

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits  Love, Death and Nature in French Art Song.  Recitals are often boring.  This performance-oriented course is for singers and pianists interested in developing ways of communicating vividly with an audience, as well as providing guidance on French diction.  We shall focus on French Art Song of the 19th and 20th centuries. Contact  Prof. Müller by email: rumu2000@earthlink.net to arrange an audition before registration.

 

91430

MUS WKSHN   "Hands-on" Music History

Patricia Spencer /

Peter Laki

. T . . .

4:40 -7:00 pm

BDH

PART

Members of this class will explore our musical past by playing it!  Also improving sight reading, the course will  cover a sampling of chamber music from different eras.  Members will build familiarity with a wide variety of harmonies and musical styles (mostly European) from the Renaissance through the present.  Background readings and class discussion about the composers will provide historical context for the works being played. Parts and scores will be provided one week in advance for those who prefer to prepare their sight-reading.  Composers may include but are not limited to: Dufay, di Lasso, Sweelinck, Purcell, Frederick the Great, J.S. Bach and his sons, Vivaldi, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Dvorak, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Ravel, Copland, Cage, Carter, Rzewski and many more.  Works will not be rehearsed to a performance level, but may occasionally be repeated.

 

91432

MUS WKSP3   Workshop: Jazz Improvisation I

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:40 -7:40 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits This class serves as an introduction to jazz improvisation. It is intended for incoming jazz ensemble players who would like to develop as improvisers, or classical players who would like to explore improvisational techniques in a jazz framework. Class size limited. Open to First-Year Students.

 

91433

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

John Esposito

M . . . .

4:40 –7:00pm

BLM N211

PART

 

91431

MUS WKSPO   Introduction to Electronic Music

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This hands-on workshop will serve as an introduction to music technology and will focus primarily on the creation of original work, including a final project, through the use of digital and analog recording techniques and devices. Foundational practices in electro- acoustic sound production will be explored alongside their contemporary/digital analogues, with particular emphasis on digital signal processing, instrument "discovery" and exploration, field   recording, and modes of electronic diffusion, including multichannel installation, performance, and multimedia. Students will be given instruction in the use of ProTools, Quicktime with Protools for soundtrack production, and will become familiar with sampling, multi- track recording, editing, and mixing. Throughout the semester, students will produce field recordings and other original recordings  in diary format and will receive instruction and guidance in utilizing  this work for electronic composition. Examples from the history of electronic music will assist students in exploring the aesthetic, political, historical and personal implications of music technology and its uses. Enrollment in this course automatically gives students access to the Bard electronic music studios.

 

91558

MUS WKSHV   Chinese Music Ensemble

Mercedes Dujunco

. T . Th .

4:40 – 6:00 pm

BLM

PART

Cross-listed: Asian Studies   2 credits.  A beginner's workshop for students interested in learning to play Chinese folk music through performance on instruments of the "silk and bamboo" (Chinese string and wind instruments) category. Students acquire basic skills on one of several instruments that may include the di (bamboo transverse flute), the erhu (2-stringed fiddle), zheng (21-string plucked board zither), yangqin (hammered dulcimer), pipa (short-necked pear-shaped plucked lute), and sanxian (long-necked 3-stringed plucked lute), with the goal of eventually playing together in ensemble. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.   

 

91517

MUS WKSPX   Music Software for Composition and Performance

Richard Teitelbaum

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This workshop will explore popular software used in music today. The main focus will be on Ableton Live, both as a composing/performing tool and as a host for software instruments and audio plugins. Programs such as Kontakt, Absynth, Reason, and Reaktor will also be explored as well as the use of hardware controllers. Students will learn how to integrate audio processing with acoustic instruments, use audio clip s and re-sampling in an interactive environment, and mix finished compositions. Creative use of these techniques will be encouraged and the student's own work shared through weekly listening sessions and a final concert. Students should have their own copy of Ableton Live (LE or full version) or arrange regular access to the department's computers.

 

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Special Projects are designed for music majors only to pursue individual or group projects with a particular Professor.

 

91434

MUS PROJ B  Special Projects

James Bagwell

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91435

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91436

MUS PROJ R  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91437

MUS PROJ U  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

91438

MUS PROJ V  Special Projects

Joan Tower

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

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PRIVATE MUSIC LESSONS

All matriculated Bard students may be eligible to receive academic credit and scholarships for private instrumental or voice lessons. The choice of teachers is to be worked out on a case by case basis by the student and the Music Department. The teacher and student arrange payments and schedule.

Requirements for academic credit:
1) Registered, matriculated Bard College student.

2) Assignment of grade, based on performance in a departmental concert or audition by an evaluating panel at the end of each semester.
3) Participation in a music course that provides the student a larger forum of music making. A waiver of this requirement is possible in certain circumstances and is subject to Music Department review.

Credits awarded for the courses:
     Lessons:  1 or 2 credits
     Performance class:  2 credits
     Ensembles:    1 or 2 credits  (check description)
     Chorus:  1 credit
Requirements for scholarship:
1) Selection for scholarship by departmental evaluating panel, either through performance in a departmental concert or through audition.
2) Registration in an ensemble or performance class.

Maximum of  12 lessons @ $30.00 per lesson (towards lesson cost) available, applied as credit to student’s Bard account.