91295

ARTH 227   Roman Urbanism

Diana Minsky

. T . Th .

3:10 -4:30 pm

FISHER ANNEX

AART

Cross-listed: Classical, Italian, and Environmental & Urban Studies  Politicians and popes – from the city’s founder (Romulus) to recent governments (including Francesco Rutelli, former mayor of Rome) – conscious of the historic significance of urban topography and architectural type, have crafted Rome into a capital that expresses their ideological aims.  This class focuses on the commissioning of large-scale representational architecture, the creation of public space, and the orchestration of streets at seven sites in continuous use since antiquity.  By charting the chronological development of these sites, the class examines the ongoing dialogue between the past and present in Rome.  Ideally, students should come to the class with some knowledge of either the art, architecture, or politics of Rome during some period of its history.  Requirements include critical essays, quizzes, and class presentations.  This class counts towards the 1400-1800 requirement in Art History.  Completion of this class qualifies as a prerequisite for Roma in situ (ARTH 248), taught during January in Rome and in the Spring at Bard.

 

91221

ITAL 110   Accelerated Italian

Anna Cafaro

         Review with tutor:

M T W Th

. . . . F

12:00 -1:00 pm

1:00 -2:00 pm

Olin L. C. 118

Olin L. C. 118

FLLC

This beginning course is designed for the student with little or no prior exposure to Italian. The course will cover the major topics of grammar and give intensive practice in the four skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing). The grammar textbook will be supplemented by traditional homework exercises and a variety of multimedia work in the Bard Foreign Language Resource Center.  Student must also enroll in a required weekly tutorial to practice oral skills.  The course is designed as an indivisible, one-year sequence and includes a semester of language study in the fall (4 credits); the Intersession Intensive Italian Program in Italy (4 credits); and a final spring semester of language study (4 credits).    

 

91057

ITAL 201   Intermediate Italian I:

Origins of Italian Literature

Joseph Luzzi

         Review with tutor:

 . T W Th .

M . . . .

10:10 - 11:30 am

10:10 - 11:30 am

Olin L. C. 120

FLLC

For students who have completed Italian 106 (Intensive) Italian 110 (Accelerated)  or the equivalent of Italian 101 and 102. Comprehensive review through practice in writing and conversation. Discussion, compositions and oral reports based on Italian literary texts and cultural material. Interested students should contact Prof. Luzzi to determine eligibility. (jluzzi@bard.edu)

 

91776

ITAL 225   Dante

Joseph Luzzi

. T  . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

Olin 107

FLLC

This course will introduce students to the world and work of the so- called “founder of all modern poetry,” Dante Alighieri. Our close   reading of the entire Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso)   will consider such issues as the phenomenology of poetic  inspiration,  medieval theories of gender, Dante’s relationship with  the literary  ghosts Virgil and Cavalcanti, the sources and shapes  of the human  soul, and how the weight of love (pondus amoris) can  save this same  soul. We will also read from Dante’s other works, including the story  of his poetic apprenticeship (The New Life) and  his linguistic  treatise (On Eloquence in the Vernacular). Conducted in English, readings in English translation; option of work in Italian for qualified students, if student wishes. Weekly section for Writing Intensive course, time tba.

 

91318

ITAL 234   Italian Cinema in the

New Millennium

Anna Cafaro

M . W . .

3:10 -4:30 pm

Olin 310

FLLC

The eminent film historian Lino Miccichè labeled Italian filmmakers of the 1980s and 1990s “orphans,” because of both the disappearance of great masters like Antonioni, Fellini, and Rossellini and the increased dominance of television in Italian life. But recent years have witnessed the resurgence of compelling work by new Italian directors, especially in films about the cultural changes created in Italy by the major waves of immigration from Asia, Northern Africa, and Eastern Europe. This course will focus on engaging works of contemporary Italian cinema, with special attention given to such themes as immigration; politics and corruption; work and social conditions; family and society. Films include Il Divo (Sorrentino); Best of Youth (Giordana); I’m not Afraid (Gabriele Salvatores). Course conducted in Italian.

 

91317

ITAL 251   The Novel and the Opera: Manzoni’s Betrothed and Verdi’s Operas

Frederick Hammond

M . W . .

10:10 – 11:30 am

Olin 104

FLLC

Cross-listed:  Music  Alessandro Manzoni’s I promessi sposi (The Betrothed), a panoramic fresco of seventeenth-century Italy during the great plague of 1631, is regarded as the greatest Italian novel of the nineteenth century. Giuseppe Verdi drew direct and indirect inspiration from Manzoni’s work, as well as dedicating his towering Requiem to Manzoni’s memory. We will read the novel, exploring the historical circumstances depicted and the parallels with Verdi’s operas, especially La forza del destino (The Force of Destiny). All course work in English.