99209

THTR 101 A  Introduction to Acting

Victoria Zischke

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

FISH

PART

3 credits  This course, intended for prospective theater majors, focuses on accessing the beginning actor’s imagination and creative energy.  Using theater games, movement work, and improvisational techniques, the intent is to expand the boundaries of accepted logic and to encourage risk-taking in the actor.  Course work includes intensive classroom sessions, individual projects designed to promote self-discovery, and group projects focused on the process of collaborative work. 

 

99210

THTR 101 B  Introduction to Acting

Jonathan Rosenberg

 . T. Th .

10:30 –12:00 pm

FISH

PART

See above.

 

99218

THTR 101 NT  Introduction to Acting

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

3:20 -5:20 pm

FISH

PART

2 credits    Scene preparation and beginning scene technique.  Emphasis on relaxation, breathing, and concentration.  Teaching the actor to make choices and implement them using sense memory and to integrate this work with the text.  Group and individual exercises and improvisations. Continuous work on the acting instrument stressing freedom, spontaneity, and individual attention. Materials: poems, monologues, stories, and scenes.  Reading of American plays, 1930 to present. 

 

99214

THTR 103   Acting Company

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

FISH

PART

3 credits Corresponding with Directing Seminar, actors work with student directors on scene work for in-class presentation. Open to first year students.

 

99215

THTR 131   Voice for Majors

Elizabeth Smith

. T . . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

FISH

PART

2 credits This course is designed to develop an awareness of the importance of physical relaxation, breath capacity and control, resonance and placement. There will also be an emphasis on clarity of articulation and the use of vocal range and inflection. This course is intended for moderated and prospective theater majors.

 

99208

THTR 141   Alexander Technique I

Judith Muir

. . W . .

12:00 – 1:20 pm

FISH

PART

1 credit. A world-respected technique developed over 100 years ago; the Alexander Technique is a valuable tool for performers, writers, scholars, and artists. It is a simple and practical approach to improving balance, coordination and movement. During this course we will learn about habits of thinking and moving that cause stress and fatigue. This awareness will enable different choices to be made in ourselves and how we respond to the environment.

 

99222

THTR 206   History of Theater

Jean Wagner

. T . Th .

1:00 -2:20 pm

OLINLC 115

AART

4 credits   This course looks at the major periods and forms of Western dramatic literature from its primal roots, through Greek and Roman Tragedy and Comedy, Medieval Theater, Tudor Comedy, Renaissance Drama, Commedia dell-arte, Elizabethan Theater, and the Spanish Golden Age. We will read plays from each of these periods as well as theoretical and critical writings which will elucidate the social and aesthetic conditions of the day. This course will provide the student with an understanding of the development of theater as an art form, and explore how theater relates to and reflects the intellectual, social, political and spiritual climate of the broader culture. This course is open to all students, and is a requirement for moderation in Theater.   

 

99223

THTR 207 A  Playwriting I

Chiori Miyagawa

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

FISH

PART

4 credits   An introductory course that focuses on discovering the writer’s voice. Through writing exercises based on dreams, visual images, poetry, social issues, found text, and music, each writer is encouraged to find his or her unique language, style, and vision.  A group project will explore the nature of collaborative works.  Students learn elements of playwriting through writing a one-act play, reading assignments, and class discussions.   This course is for sophomores and upper-college students only. 

 

99225

THTR 207 B  Playwriting I

Zakiyyah Alexander

. . . Th .

1:30 - 3:50 pm

FISH

PART

See above.

 

99224

THTR 208   Playwriting II

Chiori Miyagawa

. .T  . .

6:30 -  8:50 pm

FISH

PART

4 credits   This course will function as a writer’s workshop. Students focus on developing a full-length play, with sections of the work-in-progress presented in class for discussions.  Students grow as playwrights by developing characters and themes that are sustained through a full-length play.  The students will also read a wide range of dramatic literature and be exposed to diverse styles of playwriting. Prerequisite: Playwriting I or Theatrical Adaptations. 

 

99217

THTR 209   Scene Study

Jean Wagner

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISH

PART

3 credits   A course intended for students who have taken one semester of Intro to Acting and would like to continue their study. The course deals with movement from a games oriented curriculum into work with theatrical texts and discovery of the processes of scene study.  

 

99538

THTR / ITAL 230   History of Italian Theater

Anna Cafaro

 . T . Th .

4:30 – 5:50 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

See Italian section for description.

 

99213

THTR 303   Directing Seminar

Jonathan Rosenberg

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISH

PART

4 credits This is a studio course that covers the practice of directing from text analysis, ‘table work’, imagining the world of the play, design, casting, space, rehearsal and blocking in different configurations. The work will proceed from scenes to a full-length work. By permission of the instructor.

 

99212

THTR 307   Advanced Acting

Lynn Hawley

M . . . .

12:00 – 3:00 pm

FISH

PART

3 credits This is a studio acting class where students will explore scenes from challenging plays of varied styles. Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required. Pre-requisites: Intro to Acting and Scene Study. Maximum enrollment: 12 students.

 

99219

THTR 307 NT  Advanced Acting

Naomi Thornton

. . . Th .

1:00 -3:00 pm

FISH

PART

3 credits This is a studio acting class where students will explore scenes from challenging plays of varied styles. Extensive rehearsal time outside of class is required. Pre-requisites: for acting majors,  Intro to Acting and Scene Study. For all others, Intro to Acting. Maximum enrollment: 12 students.

 

99216

THTR 310   Survey of Drama: Two Revolutionary Playwrights: Georg Büchner & August Strindberg

JoAnne Akalaitis

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

FISH

AART

Modern drama began with an astounding jolt when the young German playwright Georg Büchner wrote Woyceck - a fragmentary unfinished play - often said to be both the first tragedy about a common man and the first modern play.  Terse, cinematic, alogical and at the same time emotional, poetic

and psychological, he wrote two other plays, Danton’s Death and Leonce and Lena and a novella Lenz and died at the age of 23.  Many have said he could have been a new Shakespeare. August Strindberg, "the Swedish Shakespeare", is a spiritual descendant of Büchner.  He was a painter, novelist, alchemist, journalist, poet and dramatist.  At the center of his work are his plays.  He wrote 50 plays, some of which are extraordinary and have influenced almost every modern playwright: Albee, Williams, Pinter, and Beckett, (who wrote Waiting for Godot after seeing The Ghost Sonata.)  He led

a tortured life and embraced strange beliefs such as that woman are inherently evil.  (At the same time, he wrote some of the greatest, most juicy women characters in drama). We will read all of Büchner’s plays including his political tract The Hessian Messenger, a range of Strindberg.  Plays: Dance of Death, A Dream Play, Easter, Ghost Sonata, parts of Inferno Diaries, and Getting Married.   Papers, scene work and visual presentations will be part of the course.

 

99220

THTR 310 B  Survey of Drama: Solo Performance; Examining the One Person Play

Zakiyyah Alexander

. . . . F

9:30 - 11:50 am

FISH

AART

One of the most complicated and difficult forms of dramatic narrative involve a single performer.  How is the one-person play constructed?  What is the intention of this work?  What are the challenges and benefits that this form of theater holds?  Who is the performer and why?  In this course we will examine different models and styles that comprise the one person show from the traditional narrative to more ambitious styles.  Works will include: Douglas Wright's, 'I Am My Own Wife,' Sarah Jones', 'Bridge and Tunnel,' Will Power's 'Flow,' as well as selected works of Stanya Kahn, Karen Finley and Anna Deveare Smith.  We will consider if structure of the solo show has a direct correlation to the time the piece was presented, the differences/connection of social commentary vs. art, as well as an investigation of the artists’ intentions.  This class will function as a workshop; students will both analyze each published work as well as complete and present their own one person play in a rehearsed staged reading.

 

99211

THTR 340   Voice in Performance

Elizabeth Smith

M . . . .

3:00 -5:00 pm

FISH

PART

2 credits This course is designed for those students who have  already had some training in voice and will concentrate on addressing demands which occur in performance such as speaking over underscoring, sustaining dialogue in fights or dances, and developing power and range. Technical exercises will be used to promote coordination of speech and movement.