99191

PHIL 104   Introduction to Philosophy

from a Multicultural Perspective

Daniel Berthold

M . W . .

9:00 - 10:20 am

OLIN 201

HUM

This course is an introduction to such major themes in the history of philosophy as the nature of reality and our capacity to know it; issues of ethics and justice; and conceptions of how one should live.  Readings will include selections from a diverse range of traditions, including Western, Hindu, Buddhist, Chinese, African, Native American, and feminist texts.

 

99193

PHIL 108   Introduction to Philosophy

David Shein

. T . Th .

4:00 -5:20 pm

OLIN 204

HUM

Western philosophers address questions that most of us naturally find puzzling, such as: do we have free will?; do we know what the world around us is really like?; does God exist?; how should we treat one another? We will critically examine historical and contemporary texts that address these and other central themes of the philosophical tradition.     

 

99194

PHIL 230   Philosophy and the Arts

Garry Hagberg

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 201

HUM

This course explores the ways that philosophers (and philosophically engaged critics) have approached issues concerning the nature and value of art.  After a discussion of Plato’s influential account of representation and the place of art in society, we will turn to questions raised by painting, photography and film, and music.  From there, we will turn to broader topics that cut across various art forms: Are serious (or “high”) and popular (or “low”) art to be understood and evaluated differently?  How do we evaluate works of art, and why do we so often disagree on their value?  And what, if anything, do the various items and activities that we classify as “art” have in common?  Readings include Hume and Kant on taste,  Stanley Cavell on the moving image, and Theodore Adorno and Walter Benjamin on mass culture. 

 

99195

PHIL 237   Symbolic Logic

Robert Martin

. . W . F

10:30 - 11:50 am

AVERY 117

MATC

Cross-listed: Cognitive Science   An introduction to logic, requiring no prior knowledge of philosophy or mathematics.  This course does not aim at communicating or justifying results about logical systems but instead aims at imparting a skill – the ability to recognize and construct correct deductions and refutations.  There is software for the course, called Logic 2000, developed by Robert Martin and David Kaplan at UCLA in the 1990s and subsequently rewritten for the internet, that will assist students by providing instant feedback on exercises. The software is based on the natural deduction system of Kalish and Montague, and covers sentential and predicate logic.    

 

99196

PHIL 255   Medical Ethics

Daniel Berthold

. T . Th .

9:00 - 10:20 am

OLIN 203

HUM

Cross-listed: GIS; Human Rights, STS    Through a reading of both theoretical literature and case studies, we will examine a range of topics in contemporary debates over medical ethics: issues of genetics, reproduction, death and dying, medical research and experimentation, involuntary psychiatric hospitalization and treatment, informed consent, confidentiality, and paternalism. On the theoretical side, we will look at competing ethical positions philosophers have proposed as models for understanding and resolving issues of medical ethics and study basic concepts with which all such theories grapple (autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice). On the practical side, we will examine the ways these theories and concepts are applied to actual cases and consider the conflict between philosophical-ethical reasoning and social, religious, and legal concerns.

 

99493

PHIL 262   Aristotle and the Experience

of Nature

Adam Rosen

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

RKC 115

HUM

Cross-listed:  STS   Contrary to modern mechanicist theories of nature wherein nature is considered from the standpoint of technical control and figured as a systematically integrated field of laws, Aristotle’s Physics and Metaphysics testify to an experience of nature as that which exceeds and encompasses the human, that which cannot be brought back to human interests and endeavors, to an experience of nature as in some sense divine. And against both modern physicalism and substance dualism, Aristotle’s Physics and Metaphysics seek to disclose the belonging together of the distinctively human – the technical, spiritual, and reflective – and the physical, that is, to elaborate an experience of nature as enchanted or ensouled (or to put it the other way around, an experience of soul as enmattered). By turning back to ancient experiences, we will seek to unsettle some of modernity’s most entrenched assumptions about nature, value, divinity, knowing, the relation between theory and practice, and indeed the meaning of “life.” We will focus primarily on Aristotle’s Physics and Metaphysics but will also draw from Aristotle’s Ethics, Generation of Animals, De Caelo, and De Anima as well as Plato’s Republic, Symposium, Phaedrus, and Timaeus.

 

99492

PHIL 264   Contemporary Feminist Philosophy

Adam Rosen

. . W . F

10:30 - 11:50 am

ASP 302

HUM/DIFF

Cross-listed: Gender & Sexuality Studies   This course will pursue the question of the future of feminism by drawing attention to how the various philosophical resources feminist philosophers draw upon – Nietzsche, Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze, Rawls, Kant, Arendt, Freud, Lacan – influence their articulations of the tasks, strategies, and goals of feminist philosophy and politics. Remaining attentive to the enabling and constraining impact of their primary philosophical influences and interlocutors, as well as the specific manner in which influences are appropriated and interlocutors engaged, we will attempt to stage a multiparty dialogue between Irigaray, Kristeva, Butler, Braidotti, Cavarero, and Cornell about the tasks and future of feminism.

 

99197

PHIL 350   Pragmatism

Garry Hagberg

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 308

HUM

A detailed examination of the content and methods of a number of classic works of American philosophy, emphasizing issues in epistemology. Authors include Peirce, William James, Royce, Dewey, Santayana, Mead, and more recent writers. The philosophical movements discussed include transcendentalism, pragmatism, empiricism, and realism. The investigation of these works will involve problems in the philosophy of religion, ethics, aesthetics, the philosophy of language, the philosophy of education, and social and political philosophy.

 

99491

PHIL 390   Politics and the Arts: Art, Philosophy, and Democratic Culture

Norton Batkin

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 309

HUM

Cross-listed: Art History   Plato banished poetry and the arts from his good city, at least until they could answer arguments that they corrupted its citizens, even its philosopher-rulers. How do we, citizens of a democratic republic in its third century, conceive the value and role of the arts in our democracy? What contribution do we think the arts make to our political culture, to our conception of ourselves as citizens? What images do they offer of the individual and his or her society in our democratic culture? In debates about public arts funding in this country, art has been defended as illustrative of democratic freedoms, particularly, freedom of expression. Is art in other ways fundamental to our democratic culture, even essential to its continuation? The last question defines a philosophical task, a reconsideration of founding conceptions of democracy in this country. It also defines a task of critical writing in and about art and culture. The course will take up topics from Ralph Waldo Emerson's hopes for American culture, to Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s, to the debates over public funding of artists during the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s, to works by Bruce Nauman, Glenn Ligon, and other contemporary artists who confront us with our moral and spiritual culture, to critical writing on the arts, popular culture, and related matters by Robert Warshow, Stanley Cavell, Toni Morrison, Michael Brenson, Dave Hickey, Mari Carmen Ramírez, and Ann Lauterbach, among others. There will be short written assignments over the course of the semester and a final paper. Prerequisites: One course in philosophy and permission of the instructor.