By the time of graduation, all music majors will be expected to have taken three semesters of Music Theory and three semesters of Music History, including at least one course above the 200 level in each case.  In addition, all music majors are expected to take one class in composition, or 4 credits in some other equivalent course involving personal musical creativity (such as small jazz ensemble); and performance class, accompanied by two semesters’ worth of private performance lessons (performance class may be replaced by some other class involving regular public performance).  It will be expected that half of these requirements be completed by time of moderation.

For a Moderation Project, students usually give a concert of about 25-40 minutes of their own music and/or other composers’ music.  Occasionally, a substantial music history or theory paper can be accepted as a moderation project. 

The Senior Project consists of two concerts from 30 to 60 minutes each.  In the case of composers, one concert can be replaced by an orchestra work written for performance by the American Symphony Orchestra.  In certain cases involving expertise in music technology, and at the discretion of the appropriate faculty, it is possible to submit finished, sophisticatedly produced recordings of music rather than live performances.  An advanced research project in music history or theory can also be considered as a senior project.

 

College & Community Ensembles

Unless otherwise noted, each ensemble is for one credit.  It is possible to participate in more than one ensemble and receive additional credit accordingly.  If private lessons are taken in conjunction with an ensemble one or two credit may be added.  Private lessons must be separately registered.

Scholarship auditions will be held on Wednesday September 9th, 2009.

 

99001

MUS 104   Bard College Orchestra

Nathan Madsen

. . W . .

7:30 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

This is a yearlong course. Students earn 2 credits per semester, and an additional 2 credits for registering in private lessons, which are strongly recommended. Auditions will be held on Monday, August 31st, 2009 for new members. Please call to set up appt., 845-758-7131. * First Orchestra rehearsal will be on Monday, September 7th, 2009 from 7:30 pm until 10:30 pm in Olin Hall. * (Please be prepared to play two pieces—one slower and lyrical, and one faster.)

 

99002

MUS 105   Bard College Symphonic Chorus

James Bagwell

. T . . .

7:00 - 10:00 pm

OLIN AUDT

PART

First rehearsal will be on Tuesday September 8th, 2009.

 

99425

MUS 106   Bard Community Chamber Music

Luis Garcia-Renart

TBA

 

.

PART

 

99426

MUS 108B   Ensemble: Contemporary

Joan Tower

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM HALL

PART

 

99427

MUS 108D   Ensemble: Chamber Singers

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

4:00 -6:00 pm

BLM HALL

PART

2 credits. Auditions will be held by appointment for new members.  First rehearsal will be on Thursday,  September 3rd, 2009.

 

99428

MUS 108F   Ensemble:Jazz Big Band

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

99429

MUS 108H   Ensemble: Balinese Gamelan

Richard Davis

M . . . .

7:00 -9:00 pm

OLIN 305

PART

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies

 

99892

MUS 108I   Electro Acoustic Ensemble

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM

PART

 

99430

MUS 108J   Ensemble: Percussion

Thurman Barker

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

99431

MUS 108N   Contemporary Jazz Composers

Erica Lindsay

. T . . .

4:30 -6:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

This class will involve the interpretation of contemporary composer’s works, ranging from sextet to big band.  This will be an advanced class restricted to instrumentalists (and vocalists) who have the necessary reading, technical, and interpretive skills to perform demanding music.  There will be a featured composer who will visit as a guest artist and perform in concert with the ensemble each semester.  Pieces written by student composers involved in the jazz composition classes will also be performed.  Class size will vary according to the amount of qualified instrumentalists and the instrumentation requirements of the featured composer.  Interested students are encouraged to sign up at registration, although confirmation of participation will only be given after auditions are held. Auditions will be conducted during the first scheduled class meeting. 

 

MUSIC COURSES

 

99432

MUS 122   Introduction to Music Theory

Blair McMillen

. . W . .

3:00 -4:20 pm

BLM N211

AART

 

 

 

. . . Th .

4:00 -5:20 pm

BLM N217

AART

This course will serve as an introduction to reading, studying, and analyzing tonal music. Introduction to Music Theory is geared toward non-music majors as well as potential music majors who have had little or no exposure to reading music. We will begin with the basics of musical notation, progressing to the identification of scales, triads, and seventh chords. Enrollment limited to 18.

 

99433

MUS 142   Western Art Music for the

Non-Specialist

Frederick Hammond

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 104

AART

This course is intended to provide all students with a basic repertory of music in the Western art tradition.  We will cover the major composers and genres from ca. 1600 to the end of the twentieth century, including Monteverdi, Bach, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner, Verdi, Brahms, Schoenberg, and Stravinsky, whose works will be presented in a larger historical context.  No specialized training or knowledge is required.  This course does not count toward a music history requirement for music majors.

 

99434

MUS 171   Jazz Harmony

John Esposito

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N211

PART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies  This course will include acquisitions of the basic skills that make up the foundation of all Jazz styles. We will also study the Jazz language from ragtime to the swing era. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.   

 

99435

MUS 201   Music Theory I

Kyle Gann / Sharon Bjorndal

.  . W . F

. T . Th .

1:30 -2:50 pm

1:00 -2:20 pm

BLM

BLM

AART

This course serves as an introduction to music theory and music making, and is the entry-level course to the classical theory sequence. Basics of musical notation will be the starting point, after which we will move quickly to scales and recognition of triads and seventh chords, as well as rhythmic performance. At all times the course will emphasize analysis of real music, and an ear-training component will reinforce the theoretical knowledge with practical experience. There are no prerequisites; the course serves as prerequisite for Music Theory II and all high-level theory courses. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.    

 

99436

MUS 211   Jazz in Literature I

Thurman Barker

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N210

AART

This course serves as an introduction to music theory and music making, and is the entry-level course to the classical theory sequence. Basics of musical notation will be the starting point, after which we will move quickly to scales and recognition of triads and seventh chords, as well as rhythmic performance. At all times the course will emphasize analysis of real music, and an ear-training component will reinforce the theoretical knowledge with practical experience. There are no prerequisites; the course serves as prerequisite for Music Theory II and all high-level theory courses. This course fulfills a music theory requirement for music majors.    

 

99437

MUS 217   Voice, Body, Machine:

Women Artists & the Evolution of the Composer

Marina Rosenfeld

. . W Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N119

AART

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies   This class explores the works and legacy of a diverse group of artists, mostly female, whose hybrid, often interdisciplinary practices challenged conventional ideas of embodiment, performance, expression and technology, and redefined the fields of experimental and electronic music during the last half-century.  Course work includes critical writing as well as creative compositional and/or performance work.  Artists considered include Pauline Oliveros, Yoko Ono, Joan La Barbara, Alison Knowles, Maryanne Amacher, Eliane Radigue, Diamanda Galas, Laetitia Sonami, Pamela Z. Terre Thaemlitz, Slits, Kembra Pfahler, Kaffe Matthews, Fe-Matt, Sachiko M, and others.

 

99438

MUS 222   Music and Spectacle in

Baroque Rome

Frederick Hammond

. T . Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 104

AART

Cross-listed: Italian Studies   We will examine musical patronage through historical documents, works of art and architecture, the decorative arts, and music.  Our principal focus will be on Rome and Venice, with special emphasis on the music of Claudio Monteverdi.  We will consider such forms of spectacle as festivals, chivalric combat, opera, and chamber entertainments.  The course is recommended for music historians, cultural historians, art historians, and Italianists.  It fulfills a music history requirement for moderated music majors.  Cross-listing: Italian Studies, Art History, Dance and Theater Arts. On-line registration.

 

99439

MUS 228   Renaissance Counterpoint

Kyle Gann

. T . Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N217

AART

The ancient musical technique of counterpoint seems of questionable relevance today.  And yet, its premise- that human attention is riveted when a unified impression is created via maximum variety- is a fertile psychological principle relevant to many fields.  Overall, this course will follow classical species counterpoint as outlined by the eminent Knud Jeppesen, based on the style of  Palestrina.  However, we will also examine the freer styles of earlier composers such as Josquin and Ockeghem, and generalize from contrapuntal concepts to such derivatives as the dissonant counterpoint of Charles Seeger and others.  The ability to read music,  and basic knowledge of musical terminology (intervals, cadences) are prerequisites.  The course counts as a music theory credit for music majors.

 

99440

MUS 238   The History and Literature of Electronic & Computer Music

Richard Teitelbaum

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

Related interest:  STS   In the 1920’s, a number of new electronic instruments such as the Theremin, the Ondes Martenot and the Trautonium were invented, and a number of composers, including Hindemith and Messiaen, composed new works for them.  After the invention of  magnetic recording tape in the late 40’s electronic music became an enterprise that was produced in special studios and fixed on tape for later playback. Starting around 1960, John Cage and David Tudor began experimental performances with such works as Cartridge Music (1960), Variations II and other pieces that reintroduced  the live performer to the electronic medium.  Many composers, such as Mumma, Behrman, Lucier, Ashley, Stockhausen, Nono, and Boulez, as well as collective improvisationally-based groups such as AMM Music in London, and Musica Elettronica Viva in Rome soon followed suit.  During the 60’s and 70’s, with the advent of smaller and the more personal synthesizers invented by Moog, Buchla and others, the field of live electronic music became a practical reality. Some ten years later, a similar sequence of events took place with regard to computer music, where the large mainframes of the 50’s and 60’s were superseded by the PC revolution of the late 70’s and 80’s.  This was followed by the more recent  development of the laptop that has enabled performers to carry powerful, portable computers on stage. This course will trace these developments, examine the literature of the field, encourage live performances of “classic” pieces, and the creation and performance of new compositions and improvisations. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken in conjunction with Electro-Acoustic Ensemble. 

 

99441

MUS 251   Expressions of National

Identity in Music

Peter Laki

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N217

AART

We routinely associate music with the country it comes from and few would disagree that geography has always played a major role in the evolution of musical styles.  Yet the idea that a country should have a distinctive musical “voice” is relatively new: it arose in the 19th C., paralleling (but not identical with) political nationalism.  In this course, we shall explore a wide range of repertoire that is narrowly linked to a particular nation.  Students will be allowed to propose countries of their choice to be included in the discussions.  There will be one term paper and a number of “symposia” where students will respond to one another’s presentations.  Students should contact Prof. Laki prior to registration to determine eligibility for enrollment.

 

99442

MUS 254A   Pronunciation and Diction

for Singers I: Italian, French, German, English & Latin

Sharon Bjorndal

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

PART

This two-semester course is an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), its symbols and practical use in performing or preparing Italian, French, German and English vocal literature.  The fall semester will be devoted to the Italian and French languages, the spring to German, English, and Latin.  Through songs, arias, and choral literature, students will take from this course a basic understanding of pronunciation rules and rhythm of each language.  While it is geared towards singers and collaborative pianists, the course is also useful for other instrumentalists and students seeking to refine pronunciation and accent.  Grading will be based on a series of quizzes and two exams, including the preparation and performance of one song per language.  Ability to read music is not required.  No previous knowledge of the languages is required.    

 

99443

MUS 264   Literature and  Language of Music I

James Bagwell

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N217

AART

A survey of selected musical works composed from Gregorian chant in the Middle Ages to the early works of Beethoven around 1800.  Works will be placed in a broad historical context with specific focus on stylistic and compositional traits.  In addition, musical terminology, composers and historical and theoretical methodology will be introduced and described in relationship to the repertoire.  Students will be evaluated on the basis of short essays and two listening exams.  As we will be using scores in our discussions, basic skills in music reading are expected.  This course is primarily designed for music majors including sophomores. This course counts towards the music history requirement for music majors.  It is not required that students take the second semester, which will survey music from Beethoven to the present day.    

 

99444

MUS 266A   American Popular Song

1900-1929

John Esposito

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

BLM N211

AART/DIFF

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies   This performance-based course is a survey of the major American popular song composers of the Tin Pan Alley era, whose work forms the core of the jazz repertoire. Composers studied will include Gershwin, Berlin, Porter, Ellington, Warren, Rodgers, and others. The course will include readings, recorded music, and films. The students and instructor will perform the music studied in a workshop setting. Prerequisite: Jazz Harmony II or permission of the instructor.

 

99445

MUS 285   Intro to Ethnomusicology

Tomie Hahn

. . W . .

. . . . F

1:30 -2:50 pm

10:30 - 11:50 am

BLM N210

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Anthropology   Ethnomusicology is the study of music in context in relation to other aspects of culture (i.e. language, religion, politics, social organization, etc.). This course will introduce students to the history, scope of subject matter, theory, and methodology of the field of ethnomusicology. We will begin by examining how the ethnomusicological study of music developed in connection with the various nuanced understandings of what “culture” is over the latter half of the past century and music’s position within these different conceptual frameworks, roughly describable as “music in culture,” “music as culture” and, finally, “music-culture”. We then move on to the study of the main research methodologies borrowed from anthropology – ethnographic fieldwork and participant observation – and how these have been adapted to and eventually became hallmarks of ethnomusicological research. By nature, ethnomusicology is a field of growing data and competing theories and approaches, and students will have to not only absorb the contents of readings from the history and present publications of the field, but also consider, debate, and evaluate the statements and theories of others in terms of their own understandings and experiences of music, culminating in a medium-length written work at the end of the semester. The course therefore cannot be “taken” by passive observation, but has to be participated in through discussion, debate, and application of students’ own individual interests in order to serve its purpose.

 

99446

MUS 304   Arithmetic of Listening

Kyle Gann

. . W . F

3:00 -4:20 pm

BLM N217

AART/DIFF

An introduction to the overtone series and the history of tuning. Learn how tuning shapes the course of a culture’s music; trace the parallel development of music and the number series back 2500 years to the teachings of Pythagoras. Hear how Bach's and Beethoven’s music sounded in its original tunings. Learn how to discriminate the pitch subtleties that differentiate Indian music; Balinese music, and even the blues from our conventional European tuning. Discover the possible uses of music in meditation; most importantly, sensitize yourself to aspects of listening that we 21st century Westerners have been trained to filter out. Learn to hear what is actually there, not just what you think is there! Final project in this class may take the form of a tuning-based analysis of either European (pre-20th century) or world music; design and/or construction of a musical instrument; or a performance of original work involving alternate tunings. Basic ability to read music is strongly recommended for this course, though it may be compensated for by a background in mathematics or acoustics. 

 

99447

MUS 324   Mahler & Fin-de-Siecle Vienna

Christopher Gibbs

. T . . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

BLM N210

AART

This course will explore the fascinating musical, cultural, and political world of fin-de-siecle Vienna through a thorough investigation of the music of Gustav Mahler.  We will consider the genesis of his songs and symphonies, their literary and intellectual sources, and the initial reception of his works in Vienna.  Mahler’s accomplishment will be situated with regard to his older and younger musical contemporaries, most notably Wagner, Brahms, Strauss, Schoenberg, Webern, and Berg.  Taking a broader view as well, we will look at Mahler’s relationship to the artistic, intellectual, and political trends of his time through figures like Sigmund Freud (whom Mahler consulted when his marriage to the beautiful Alma Schindler was in trouble), Arthur Schnitzler, Karl Kraus, and Gustav Klimt.  Students will give seminar presentation and write a term paper.

 

99448

MUS 331   Jazz: The Freedom Principle I

Thurman Barker

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

Cross-listed: Africana Studies, American Studies, SRE   A jazz study of the cross-pollination between Post-Bop in the late fifties and Free Jazz. The course, which employs a cultural approach, is also designed to look at the social climate surrounding the music to examine its effects on the music from 1958 to the mid-sixties. Emphasis will be on artists and composers such as Cecil Taylor, Ornette Coleman, Art Blakey, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Max Roach, Eric Dolphy, Charles Mingus, and Horace Silver. Illustrated with recordings, films, and videos.

 

99564

MUS 334   Topics in Music History

and Theory: Disorder, Chaos and Madness 

Raphael Mostel

. . . . F

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N210

AART

From the Chaos Overture of Hadyn's "Creation" to Wozzeck's madness in Berg's opera to Ligeti's elegant "Desordre," composers throughout history have sought to give form to non-form. This seminar will examine the concepts, contradictions and achievements when composers walk on the wild side. Each student will be expected to make individual presentations in class of selected examples, to be critiqued and enlarged on by the class. The revised, collected presentations as pdf or powerpoint will be the final. 

 

99451

MUS 346   Interactive Performance and Composition Using MAX/MSP

Robert Bielecki

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

MAX/MSP is an object oriented graphical programming environment for algorithmic music composition, interactivity, live processing, multimedia and more.  This course covers beginning, intermediate, and advanced methods of using MAX/MSP.  This will be a hands-on course with examples from artist’s work, several programming assignments and a final project.  Knowledge of computer programming and MIDI is not necessary, but would be helpful.

 

99452

MUS 352   Electronic, Electroacoustic

 and Computer Music Composition

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N119

PART

This course, intended primarily for music majors, will be focused on the individual creative work of the students enrolled.  Each will be expected to bring in his or her ongoing work as computer programs, digital or analog recordings and scores for live electronic realization.  These will be examined and commented on by the instructor and other class members.  Installations and mixed media works will also be welcomed.  Analyses and class presentations of classic works by such composers as Stockhausen, Cage, Xenakis, etc., will also be expected of the students during the semester.  Public presentations of student work will be made at the end of the semester. By consent of the instructor.

 

99453

MUS 366A   Advanced Contemporary Jazz Techniques I

John Esposito

. . . Th .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course introduces methods for the jazz improviser to deconstruct and reorganize the basic harmonic and rhythmic elements for a composition.  Issues addressed will include reharmonization, remetering, metric modulation, variations in phrasing, tempo, and dynamics; that is, the arrangement and reorganization of compositional elements.  This is performance oriented class and repertoire will include jazz standards and compositions of the instructor.  This class is open to moderated upper college students who have successfully completed Jazz Harmony I and II, and previous jazz repertory classes.  This course fulfills an upper level music theory requirement for music majors.

 

99454

MUS 367A   Jazz Composition I

Erica Lindsay

. . W . .

6:00 -9:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

This course explores the strategies of Jazz Composition including basic modal harmony, melodic and rhythmic development.    

 

WORKSHOPS:

 

99455

MUS WKSHA II  Workshop: Composition

Joan Tower

M . . . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

BLM HALL

PART

This workshop is for both composers and performers- primarily music majors who can read music. The process is one of learning how to put one's  musical soul onto the page, pass that  page first to players in the class and then  eventually to professionals(the  Da Capo Players) who give a concert of some of that music at the end  of each semester. All along the way, the hope is that the music will "come back" to the composer as he or she had intended it to with some kind of profile and excitement.  Students should contact Prof. Tower prior to registration to determine eligibility.

 

99456

MUS WKSHB   Workshop: Performance Class

Luis Garcia-Renart / Blair McMillen

. T . Th .

. . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

4:00 -6:20 pm

BLM HALL

BLM HALL

PART

This class is conceived as a unifying workshop for performing musicians within the department. Please meet with the instructor prior to or during registration. 

 

99457

MUS WKSHG   Workshop: Vocal & Voice

Arthur Burrows

. . W . .

10:00 - 12:00 pm

BDH

PART

2 credits In this singing class we explore the art songs of America, England, France and Germany, including some opera arias and ensembles depending on the make-up of the class. At the same time we learn the necessary technique to perform them successfully. Each class will be divided into two parts. The first will deal with vocal technique, and the second with technical issues that arise from individual performance. Requirements: the ability to match pitches, and an adequate vocal range. Pianists will be assigned individual singers to work with and coached in the various musical styles.   

 

99458

MUS WKSHL   Workshop: Opera Workshop

Rufus Müller /

Ilka LoMonaco

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BDH

PART

4 credits   Work is to be decided.  For more information see Professor Muller.   Contact  Prof. Müller by email: rumu2000@earthlink.net to arrange an audition before registration.

 

99459

MUS WKSHM   Workshop:

Full Fathom Five

Rufus Muller

M . . . .

2:00 -4:20 pm

BDH

PART

In this course we shall study Shakespeare song settings from all eras and in all languages.  Both singers and pianists are highly encouraged to participate in this exploration of performance and communication with the listener.  The course ends with a public recital.

 

99460

MUS WKSP3   Workshop: Jazz Improvisation I

Erica Lindsay

. . . Th .

4:00 -7:00 pm

BLM N211

PART

2 credits This class serves as an introduction to jazz improvisation. It is intended for incoming jazz ensemble players who would like to develop as improvisers, or classical players who would like to explore improvisational techniques in a jazz framework. Class size limited. Open to First-Year Students.

 

99461

MUS WKSP7   Jazz Vocal Workshop

John Esposito

. . . Th .

7:00 -9:30 pm

BLM N211

PART

 

99504

MUS WKSPX  Music Software for Composition and Performance

Richard Teitelbaum

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

BLM N110

PART

This workshop will explore popular software used in music today. The main focus will be on Ableton Live, both as a composing/performing tool and as a host for software instruments and audio plugins. Programs such as Kontakt, Absynth, Reason, and Reaktor will also be explored as well as the use of hardware controllers. Students will learn how to integrate audio processing with acoustic instruments, use audio clip s and re-sampling in an interactive environment, and mix finished compositions. Creative use of these techniques will be encouraged and the student's own work shared through weekly listening sessions and a final concert. Students should have their own copy of Ableton Live (LE or full version) or arrange regular access to the department's computers.

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS:

Special Projects are designed for music majors only, to pursue individual or group projects with a particular Professor. Schedules are arranged individually.

 

99462

MUS PROJ B  Special Projects

James Bagwell

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

99463

MUS PROJ EL  Special Projects

Erica Lindsay

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

99464

MUS PROJ R  Special Projects

Luis Garcia-Renart

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

99465

MUS PROJ U  Special Projects

Kyle Gann

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

99466

MUS PROJ V  Special Projects

Joan Tower

. . . . .

 

.

PART

 

99467

MUS PROJ Z  Special Projects

Thurman Barker

. . . . .

 

.

PART