99076

ITAL 110   Accelerated Italian

Anna Cafaro

Tutoring session

M T W Th .

 .  .  .  .  F

1:25 -2:25 pm

1:25 -2:25 pm

OLINLC 118

OLINLC 118

FLLC

This beginning course is designed for the student with little or no prior exposure to Italian. The course will cover the major topics of grammar and give intensive practice in the four skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing). The grammar textbook will be supplemented by traditional homework exercises and a variety of multimedia work in the Bard Foreign Language Resource Center.  Student must also enroll in a required weekly tutorial to practice oral skills.  The course is designed as an indivisible, one-year sequence and includes a semester of language study in the fall (4 credits); the Intersession Intensive Italian Program in Italy (4 credits); and a final spring semester of language study (4 credits).    

 

99073

ITAL 201   Intermediate Italian I

Joseph Luzzi

Tutoring session:

. T W Th .

. . . . F

10:30 - 11:50 am

10:30 - 11:30 am

RKC 200

RKC 200

FLLC

For students who have completed Italian 106 (Intensive) Italian 110 (Accelerated)  or the equivalent of Italian 101 and 102. Comprehensive review through practice in writing and conversation. Discussion, compositions and oral reports based on Italian literary texts and cultural material. Interested students should contact Prof. Luzzi to determine eligibility. (jluzzi@bard.edu)

 

99538

ITAL 230   History of Italian Theater (Literature in Translation)

Anna Cafaro

 . T . Th .

4:30 – 5:50 pm

OLINLC 208

FLLC

Cross-listed:  Theater   This course introduces students to the world of Italian theater from the Renaissance to today. Students are led to a comprehensive historical overview of Italian theater, its protagonists, and its fundamental role in the evolution of Italian society, through audiovisual expositions, and discussions that include interdisciplinary themes. Plays of Commedia dell’Arte, Goldoni, Pirandello, De Filippo, Fo, Maraini will be studied within their historical, social and aesthetic contexts.  Readings/course work in English; students have option of doing work in Italian with instructor's approval.

 

99054

ITAL 301   Advanced Italian: Origins

of Italian Literature

Amelia Moser

. . W . F

3:00 -4:20 pm

OLINLC 118

FLLC

The debt of gratitude authors like Chaucer, Shakespeare, Sydney, Pope  and numerous others owed to Italian literature is well known. But what  was it about Italian poetry that gave it such outstanding authority?  Much of the answer lies in early Italian poets’ obsession with  redefining “love” and distinguishing the array of nuances within it.  The growing discourse over love’s scientific essence superceded the  view of its predominantly religious make-up, and generated new ideas  about its role in obtaining knowledge of the self, nature and god, in  addition to its influence in creating an ideal society on earth. Such ideas challenged the social parameters (and over time, many legal parameters) put into place by Christianity. This course will examine the various permutations of the concept of love from the medieval to the early-modern age, also exploring how literary genres (lyric/epic poetry, novelle, dialogues, medical / magical treatises, letters, memoirs, theatre) reflected beliefs about how and when one was to learn the lessons of love or become a victim to it.  Authors include Lentini, Cavalcanti, Guinizelli, Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Ficino,  Ariosto, Bembo, Machiavelli, Aretino, Franco, Michelangelo, Stampa,  Patrizi, Bruno, Marino, Pallavicino, and Casanova. The course is taught in Italian with critical readings in Italian and English.  Advanced grammar review will be incorporated into the written work.    

 

99234

ARTH 230   The Early Renaissance

Jean French

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 102

AART

Cross-listed:  Italian Studies;  Science, Technology & Society    A survey of Italian painting and sculpture of the fourteenth  and fifteenth centuries.  Major trends from Giotto and Duccio through Piero della Francesca and Botticelli are analyzed within a wider cultural context.  Consideration is given to the evolution of form, style, technique, and iconography; contemporary artistic theory; and the changing role of the artist in society. Open to all students.

 

99551

HIST 184   Inventing Modernity: Peasant Commune, Renaissance and Reformation in the German and Italian Worlds,   1291-1806

Gregory Moynahan

M . W . .

3:00 -4:20 pm

OLINLC 208

HIST

Cross-listed: German Studies, Italian Studies, STS     Using as its starting point Jacob Burckhardt's classic account The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, this course will examine the role of the drastic upheavals of the early modern period in defining the origins of such modern institutions as capitalism, political individuality, religious freedom, democracy, and the modern military. The geographic focus will be the towns, cities, and peasant communes of the Italian and German speaking regions of Europe, particularly the Italian peninsula, Holy Roman Empire, and Switzerland.  Two apparently opposed developments will be at the center of our approach: first, the role of the autonomous peasant commune, particularly in Switzerland, as a model and spur for political forms such as democracy and anarchism; second, the development of modern capitalism and technology as they came to impinge on the traditional feudal and communal orders. The course will also address the historiography and politics -surrounding the "invention" of the Renaissance in the late nineteenth century, looking particularly at Burckhardt's relation with Ranke, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

 

99074

LIT 323   Economies of Modern European Literature

Joseph Luzzi

. T . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

RKC 200

ELIT

See Literature section for description.

 

99438

MUS 222   Music and Spectacle in

Baroque Rome

Frederick Hammond

. T . Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 104

AART

Cross-listed: Italian Studies   We will examine musical patronage through historical documents, works of art and architecture, the decorative arts, and music.  Our principal focus will be on Rome and Venice, with special emphasis on the music of Claudio Monteverdi.  We will consider such forms of spectacle as festivals, chivalric combat, opera, and chamber entertainments.  The course is recommended for music historians, cultural historians, art historians, and Italianists.  It fulfills a music history requirement for moderated music majors.  Cross-listing: Italian Studies, Art History, Dance and Theater Arts. On-line registration.