99157

HIST 101   Europe from 1350-1815

Alice Stroup

. T . Th .

9:00 - 10:20 am

OLIN 205

HIST

The millennium opened a new era of European ascendancy. For three hundred years, Europe basked in warmer weather. Northern Europeans improved agriculture and lived longer, and a new middle class revived cities as centers of commerce and culture, on both sides of the Alps. Inventions like mechanical clocks, cannons, and mills inaugurated a first industrial revolution (complete with water- and air-pollution). Then came the apocalypse: a little ice age and the Black Death shaped the material conditions of life for the next five centuries. After fifty percent of Europeans died (1340-1350), famine and epidemic kept the population in check until the 1700s. Yet we associate these five hundred years with the invention of the printing press and the rise of literacy; with socio-intellectual ferments associated with Renaissance, Reformations and Counter-Reformations, Enlightenment, and Scientific Revolution; with socio-political revolutions that modernized the Netherlands, England, and France; and with the creation of a global empire. How can we explain the continued ascendancy of Europe in such hard times? To understand the paradoxical making of Europe, we will read primary sources and modern historical analyses.     

 

99419

JS / HIST 120   Jewishness Beyond Religion

Cecile Kuznitz

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

ASP 302

HIST/DIFF

See Jewish Studies for description.

 

99166

HIST 130   Origins of American Citizen

Christian Crouch

M . W . .

12:00 -1:20 pm

OLIN 202

HIST

Cross-listed:  American Studies; Human Rights;  SRE   The United States is often portrayed historically as emerging triumphantly in 1776 to offer inclusive citizenship and a transcendent, tolerant “American” identity to all its indigenous and immigrant residents.  Yet the reality of American history belies this myth. The nation’s history is transnational and yet we focus mostly on its Anglophone roots, ignoring that the “U.S.” was carved out of the contests of many empires and grew on internationally based forced labor regimes.  It is a story of individuals, alone and/or together, contesting, reacting towards, rejecting, influencing, and embracing the changing notions of what “the United States” and “America” were from the sixteenth century well into the nineteenth century. The course focuses on six moments that definitively challenged and shaped conceptions of “American identity”, “citizen”, and “the United States”: the early colonial period, the Constitutional Convention, Cherokee Removal, the era of the internal slave trade and the “Market Revolution”, the Mexican-American War, and Reconstruction.    

 

99418

HIST 139   City Cultures

Cecile Kuznitz

. T . Th .

10:30 - 11:50 am

ALBEE 106

HIST

Cross-listed: Environ.  & Urban Studies   The built environment of cities is a powerful indicator of the social and cultural history of urban populations.  In this course we will look comparatively at five cities in the U.S. and Western and Eastern Europe, considering a variety of physical structures and spaces from the industrial and postindustrial eras. We will examine features of the urban landscape including parks, tenements, cafes, freeways, and even sewers. We will read these sites for what they reveal about urban life across time, including such issues as technological innovation, new forms of leisure, changing relationships to the environment, the development of working class culture, and the imposition of political hegemony. Cities to be studied include New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Paris, and Vilna.

 

99159

HIST 140   Intro to Russian Civilization

Gennady Shkliarevsky

M . W . .

3:00 -4:20 pm

OLIN 203

HIST

Cross-listed: Medieval Studies, Russian and Eurasian Studies   This course examines the origins and evolution of Russian civilization from the founding of the first Eastern Slavic state through the eighteenth century, when Russia began to modernize by borrowing from Western culture. Among the topics to be considered are the ethnogeny of early Russians, the development of state and legal institutions, the relationship between kinship and politics, the role of religion in public and private spheres, economic organization, social institutions, family, gender relations, sexuality, popular culture, and the impact of the outside world (both Orient and Occident) upon Russian society. The sources include a variety of Russian cultural expressions (folk tales, literature, art, film, music), original documents, and scholarly texts.

 

99013

HIST / CLAS 157   The Athenian Century

Carolyn Dewald

. T . Th .

2:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 202

HIST

Cross-listed: Classical Studies    In the fifth century BCE, Athens dramatically developed from a small, relatively unimportant city-state into a dominant power in the Aegean basin. Athenian political, artistic, literary, and intellectual traditions continue to reverberate through the world today: democracy, tragedy and comedy, rhetoric, philosophy, and history itself, as well as the classical style of sculpture and architecture stem from this remarkable culture. The course will confront some of the ambiguities and tensions (slavery, exclusion of women and non-citizens from political power), as well as the glories, of Athenian art, literature, and history during this period. We will read selections from the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, many of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, the comedies of Aristophanes, and one or two dialogues of Plato.   

 

99551

HIST 184   Inventing Modernity: Peasant Commune, Renaissance and Reformation in the German and Italian Worlds,   1291-1806

Gregory Moynahan

M . W . .

3:00 -4:20 pm

OLINLC 208

HIST

Cross-listed: German Studies, Italian Studies, STS     Using as its starting point Jacob Burckhardt's classic account The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, this course will examine the role of the drastic upheavals of the early modern period in defining the origins of such modern institutions as capitalism, political individuality, religious freedom, democracy, and the modern military. The geographic focus will be the towns, cities, and peasant communes of the Italian and German speaking regions of Europe, particularly the Italian peninsula, Holy Roman Empire, and Switzerland.  Two apparently opposed developments will be at the center of our approach: first, the role of the autonomous peasant commune, particularly in Switzerland, as a model and spur for political forms such as democracy and anarchism; second, the development of modern capitalism and technology as they came to impinge on the traditional feudal and communal orders. The course will also address the historiography and politics -surrounding the "invention" of the Renaissance in the late nineteenth century, looking particularly at Burckhardt's relation with Ranke, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

 

99880

HIST 185   Introduction to the History

of the Middle East

Mouannes Hojairi

M . W .  .

10:30-11:50 am

OLIN 306

HIST/DIFF

Cross-listed: Middle Eastern Studies   This course is designed to introduce students to the history of the region between the Atlantic Ocean and Central Asia, commonly known as the Middle East. It will cover the period from the end of the sixth century AD, eve of the rise of Islam, until the early sixteenth century and the demise of the Mameluke Sultanate. The course is designed to familiarize students with the social and the intellectual history of the region in the period spanning from the rise of Islam until the modern era. The course will explore the emergence of Islam as a world religion and the forces it set in motion; it will also address Islamic civilization and its characteristic political, social, and religious institutions and intellectual traditions. The readings will include a cross section of intellectual production, a myriad of cultural expressions as well as primary and secondary historical sources from the sixth century AD to the present. We will be examining a multitude of sources such as pre-Islamic poetry from the Arabian Peninsula, Quranic script, and theological, philosophical and scientific productions from the Medieval Islamic Empire.

 

99494

HIST 2122   The Arab-Israel Conflict

Joel Perlmann

. T . Th .

4:00 -5:20 pm

OLIN 202

SSCI/DIFF

Cross-listed: GIS, Human Rights, Jewish Studies, Middle East Studies    This course is meant to provide students with an understanding of this conflict from its inception to the present. Considerable attention will be given to the present; nevertheless, the conflict is simply incomprehensible without a solid understanding of its evolution - incomprehensible not merely in terms of details, but in terms of broader themes and aroused passions. Among the themes to be discussed are the following. A Jewish national movement arose in the late nineteenth century to oppose the conditions of Jewish life in Europe, and an Arab national movement (as well as a specifically Palestinian movement) arose to oppose Ottoman and European rule of Arab peoples. Out of the clash of these movements emerged the State of Israel and the Palestinian refugees in 1948. The political character of the conflict has changed over the decades: first it involved competing movements (before 1948), then chiefly a conflict of national states (Israel vs. Egypt, Syria, Jordan, etc), and now it is conceived as chiefly a conflict between Israeli military rule of territories (occupied since the 1967 war) and an insurgent Palestinian independence movement. Military realities also changed greatly, as did the accusations about the role of ‘terror’ as a tactic (from the Jewish Irgun to Hamas) and the role of religion. And not least, the conflict has been shaped by strategic and economic considerations of the great powers (Ottoman, British, American/Soviet, hegemonic American) as well as by considerations of domestic political culture in Israel and in the Arab world.     

 

99169

HIST 2481   Mao's China & Beyond:

A History of the People’s Republic

Robert Culp

M . W . .

10:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 205

HIST

Cross-list: Asian Studies, GIS   No individual shaped modern China, and arguably any one human society, more than Mao Zedong. This course uses Mao’s life and writings as a framework and material for exploring twentieth-century Chinese history. We will focus first on the course of China’s twentieth-century revolutions, and relate those movements to other social, cultural, and economic trends, including urbanization, industrialization, the urban-rural gap, consumerism, various intellectual and cultural movements, and the expansion of the mass media. For the Maoist period (1949-1978) we will address topics related to youth culture, socialist citizenship, and political violence, using sources like memoirs and party propaganda to explore the dynamics of Chinese state socialism and the Cultural Revolution decade (1966-1976). The final third of the course will focus on contemporary China in light of the history of the period of Reform and Opening (1978-present), since Mao’s death. Fiction, film, television, advertisements, and other mass media will help us understand how contemporary China has developed in reaction to the Maoism of the previous decades. No prior study of China is necessary; first year students are welcome.

 

99479

HIST 2551   Joyce’s Ulysses, Modernity,

 and Nationalism

Gregory Moynahan

M . W . .

12:00 -1:20 pm

RKC 200

HIST

Cross-listied:  Irish & Celtic Studies; STS; Victorian Studies   Although it concerns only the day of June 16th, 1904, each chapter of James Joyce’s Ulysses is famously written in a radically different historical and literary style.  In this course, we will complement Joyce’s stylistic innovation by using contemporary documents (newspaper accounts, advertising, folksongs, etc.) and historical texts  (epic, medieval chronicle, heroic, modern ironic) to unfold the historical context and resonance of each of Joyce’s chapters.  The course as a whole will then question how these various means of casting the reader in time and history illuminate the modernism and political reality of Dublin in 1904, and particularly the ethnic, religious, and social tensions that led Joyce to a life of exile from the Ireland of his text.  The goal will be both a survey of historical methodologies and an historical introduction to the problems of modernism and nationalism using this highly documented example.  Key issues addressed will be the function of historical and mythical time in everyday life, Joyce’s narrative as an anti-nationalist (yet, somehow, nationalist) epic, the role of popular scientific writing and technology in the creation of reality, the politics of gender and sexuality in the fin-de-siècle, the function of terrorism in politics, and the effect of politics and mass media on “personal” experience.  Required Texts:  James Lydon, The Making of Ireland: A History ; James Joyce, Hans Walter Gabler (Editor), Ulysse;  Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce’s Ulysses: A Study;  James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Penguin)

 

99167

HIST 2631   Capitalism and Slavery

Christian Crouch

M . W . .

1:30 -2:50 pm

OLIN 202

HIST

Cross-listed:  American Studies,   Human Rights (core course)   Scholars have argued that there is an intimate relationship between the contemporary wealth of the developed world and the money generated through four hundred years of chattel slavery in the Americas and the transatlantic slave trade. Is there something essential that links capitalism, even liberal democratic capitalism, to slavery? How have struggles against slavery and for freedom and rights, dealt with this connection? This course will investigate the development of this linkage, studying areas like the gender dynamics of early modern Atlantic slavery, the correlation between coercive political and economic authority, and the financial implications of abolition and emancipation.  We will focus on North America and the Caribbean from the early 17th century articulation of slavery through the staggered emancipations of the 19th century. The campaign against the slave trade has been called the first international human rights movement – today does human rights discourse simply provide a human face for globalized capitalism, or offer an alternative vision to it?  Questions of contemporary reparations, rising colonialism and markets of the nineteenth century, and the 'duty' of the Americas to Africa will also be considered.  Readings will include foundational texts on capitalism and a variety of historical approaches to the problem of capitalism within slavery, from economic, cultural, and intellectual perspectives.  There are no prerequisites, although HIST 130, 2133, or 263 all serve as introductory backgrounds.   

 

99160

HIST 279   East Central Europe after WWII

Gennady Shkliarevsky

. T . Th .

4:00 -5:20 pm

OLIN 201

HIST

Cross Listed:  GIS;  Russian and Eurasian Studies   The course will cover the history of East Central Europe from 1945 to the present. After a brief summary of the history of the region before and during World War II, the course will concentrate on the region’s evolution since the war. In addition to surveying the period and examining the turning points in its evolution (for example, the Berlin uprising of 1953, the Hungarian revolution and reforms in Poland in 1956, the "Prague spring" of 1968, the Solidarity movement in Poland, and the revolutions at the end of the 1980s), we will explore a variety of specific topics, including political systems, economic organization, ethnic conflicts, and gender relations. Readings will include a textbook, specialized studies, original sources, and works of fiction.

 

99163

HIST / AFR 310   Captivity and Law

Tabetha Ewing

. . . . F

9:30 - 11:50 am

OLIN 101

HIST

See Africana Studies for description.

 

99170

HIST 3103   Political Ritual in the 

Modern World

Robert Culp

. . . Th .

1:00 -3:20 pm

OLIN 308

HIST/DIFF

Cross-list: Anthropology; Asian studies; GIS; Human Rights   The Imperial Durbar, Bastille Day, the US presidential inaugural, Japan’s celebration of victory in the Russo-Japanese War, pageants reenacting the Bolshevik Revolution, and the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics. In all these forms and many others, political ritual has been central to nation-building, colonialism, and political movements over the last three centuries. This course uses a global, comparative perspective to analyze the modern history of political ritual. We will explore the emergence of new forms of political ritual with the rise of the nation-state in the nineteenth century and track global transformations in the performance of politics as colonialism spread the symbols and pageantry of the nation-state. Central topics will include state ritual and the performance of power, the relationship between ritual and citizenship in the modern nation-state, the ritualization of politics in social and political movements, and the power of mediated mass spectacle in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Seminar meetings will focus on discussion of secondary and primary materials that allow us to analyze the intersection of ritual and politics in a variety of contexts. These will range from early-modern Europe, pre-colonial Bali, and late-imperial China to revolutionary France, 19th-century America, colonial India, post-colonial Africa, several fascist and socialist states, Europe in 1968, Asad’s Syria, and the contemporary global marketplace. In addition to common readings and seminar participation, students will write a final seminar paper exploring one aspect or instance of political ritual. Moderated history students can use this course for a major conference.

 

99417

HIST 3108   Jewish Women: Gender Roles

& Cultural Change

Cecile Kuznitz

M . . . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

OLIN 301

HIST

Cross-listed:   Gender and Sexuality Studies    This course will draw on both historical and memoir literature to examine the lives of Jewish women and men and their changing social, economic, and religious lives across the medieval and modern periods.  We will consider the status of women in Jewish law and then look at issues including forms of women’s religious expression; marriage and family patterns; the differing impact of enlightenment and secularization on women in Western and Eastern Europe; and the role of women in the Zionist and labor movements in Europe, Israel, and the 

United States. Among the central questions we will ask is how women’s roles changed from the medieval to the modern period. Did modernity in 

Fact herald an era of greater opportunity for Jewish women? How did their experiences differ from those of Jewish men?

 

99158

HIST 3112   PLAGUE!

Alice Stroup

M . . . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 308

HIST

Cross-listed:  EUS; Human Rights; Medieval Studies   The cry “Plague!” has struck fear among people around the world, from antiquity to the present.  What is plague?  How has it changed history?  Starting with Camus’ metaphorical evocation of plague in a modern North African city, we will examine the historical impact of plague on society.  Our focus will be bubonic plague, which was epidemic throughout the Mediterranean and European worlds for four hundred years, and which remains a risk in many parts of the world (including the southwestern United States) to this day.  Topics include: a natural history of plague; impact of plague on mortality and socio-economic structures; effects on art and literature; early epidemiology and public health; explanations and cures; the contemporary presence of bubonic plague and fears about “new plagues.”  Readings include: literary works by Camus, Boccaccio, Manzoni, and Defoe; historical and philosophical analyses by ancients Thucydides and Lucretius; contemporary literature on history, biology, and public health.  Upper College Seminar: open to fifteen moderated students.   

 

99394

HIST 315   Education and Social Policy

in the U.S., 1954 – 2002

Ellen Condliffe Lagemann

. . W . .

1:30 -3:50 pm

OLIN 302

HIST

Cross-listed: Sociology;  Social Policy     In this seminar, we will explore the history of education and social policy in the United States from Brown v. Board of Education (1954) to passage of No Child Left Behind (2002).  We will be concerned with the roles of institutions (notably, research and advocacy organizations, think tanks, and philanthropic foundation), social movements and political parties, the mass media of communication, and individual men and women in the shaping of public policy.  All students will be expected to complete weekly reading assignments and to be active participants in every class.  There will be several short response papers and each student will write a major research paper on a topic of his or her choosing. 

 

99481

HIST 3234   Your Papers Please? Technocracy, Technology, and Social Control in Nazi Germany, the DDR and BRD

Gregory Moynahan

. T . . .

4:00 -6:20 pm

OLIN 309

HIST

Cross-listed: GIS;  Human Rights, Science, Technology & Society    In this research course, we will address the coercive and violent powers of the modern state as they were refined through technologies and techniques in National Socialist Germany, and then alternately condemned and utilized in the two German nations of the (East) German Democratic Republic (DDR) and the (West) German Federal Republic (BRD).  Topics will range from the development of new techniques of propaganda and military oversight to the manipulation of social technologies such as identification papers, the census, racial pseudo-science, and, most horrifically, the concentration camp system.  At the end of the Nazi period, the DDR defined itself through its resistance to the Nazi party, and nearly the entirety of its ideology was grounded in anti-Fascism and cosmopolitanism.  The means of organizing and controlling society were often directly carried over from the Nazi past.  Similarly, the liberal capitalist ideology of the BRD defined itself in complete opposition to the Nazi past, but here as well there were surprising number holdovers from the Nazi era, ranging from the system of registering with the police to the retention of leading bureaucrats.  By comparing the two movements, ideologically complete opposites yet organizationally often surprisingly similar, we can address some of the most disturbing issues of modern techniques of social control.  Similarly, protests within each system against specific moments of state power – ranging from issues such as the use of the census and identity cards to methods of police surveillance and conscription – were frequently couched in terms of their links with the Nazi era.  Please note that the core of this course will be spent writing and refining an independent historical research paper of approximately 30 pages in length.  No previous knowledge of German history is required, although students without such knowledge will need to set aside time for some background reading.