98489

FILM 109   The History and Aesthetics of Film

Gerard Dapena

. . . Th .

. . .W. .

9:30 -12:30 pm

7:00 - 10:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

AART

(Screening)

A one-semester survey course comprising weekly screenings and lectures designed for first-year students, especially those who are considering film as a focus of their undergraduate studies. Films by Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Rossellini, Hitchcock, Deren, and others are studied. Readings of theoretical works by authors including Vertov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Munsterberg, Bazin, and Arnheim. Open to first-year students only.

 

98488

FILM 113   History of Film

John Pruitt

.  W .

.  T ...

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 - 10:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

AART

(Screening)

A lecture survey course that traces the medium of film as an art form from its origins to the end of the silent era. An emphasis will be placed on particularly prominent "schools" of filmmaking: The American Silent Comedy, German Expressionism, The Soviet and European Avant-gardes. The long list of film artists to be screened and studied include: the Lumiere Brothers, George Melies, D.W. Griffith, Lois Weber, Germaine Dulac, Sergei Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Yasujiro Ozu, Carl Dreyer, Fernand Leger, Luis Bunuel, Man Ray, Erich von Stroheim, F. W. Murnau, Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. Readings will consist mostly of classic aesthetic studies from the era itself, those by Eisenstein, Vertov, Munsterberg, Arnheim, et al. Course is limited to First-Year students only and is highly recommended for (but not restricted to) those students who are contemplating film as a major course of study. Two essay exams and a term paper.  Open to first-year students only.

 

98350

FILM 167   Survey of Media Art

Ed Halter

. . . Th .

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 - 10:00 pm

AVERY 110

AVERY 110

AART

(Screening)

An introduction to the history of moving-image art made with electronic media, with a focus on avant-garde traditions. Topics include video art, guerrilla television, expanded cinema, feminist media, Net art, music video, microcinema, digital feature filmmaking and art made from video games. Open to first-year students only.

 

98341

FILM 201 A  Intro to the Moving Image:Film

Kelly Reichardt

. T . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PART

Introduction to the basic problems (technical and theoretical) related to film and/or electronic motion picture production. Coupled with Film 202 (offered in Spring), this course is designed to be taken in the sophomore year and leads to a spring Moderation project in the Film and Electronic Arts Program. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200- level course in Film or Video History.

 

98344

FILM 201 B  Intro to Moving Image: Video

Jacqueline Goss

. . W . .

1:30 - 4:30 pm

AVERY 116/333

PART

See above.

 

98348

FILM 201 C  Intro to Moving Image: Video

Les LeVeque

. . . Th .

9:30 - 12:30 pm

AVERY 116

PART

See above.

 

98353

FILM 201 D  Intro to Moving Image: Film

Peter Hutton

. . . Th .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PART

See above.

 

98342

FILM 205   Narrative Film Workshop

Kelly Reichardt

. .W . .

9:30 - 12:30 pm

AVERY 117

PART

A filmmaking workshop for students especially interested in narrative form.  Approaches to visual storytelling, examination of narrative strategies, hands-on shooting, and solutions of practical and/or aesthetic problems, as they are encountered in the making of a film.   

 

98514

FILM 212   Screenwriting I

Marie Regan

. . W . .

9:30 -12:30 pm

AVERY 338

PART

Screenplays are the foundation of much of our popular culture, but can they be art? This intensive writing workshop examines the art and practice of the screenplay form, its root in classical narrative structure, how it differs from the other written arts and how one can engage its particular tools to express original ideas. Weekly writing assignments and class critique form the heart of this workshop. Students should be prepared to share their work with others and participate fully in class discussion.   

 

98487

FILM 213 Topics in Film History: Latin American Cinema

Gerard Dapena

. T  . .

M . . . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

7:00 – 11:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 110

AART

(Screening)

This course seeks to provide students with an historical overview of filmmaking in Latin America and an introduction to the theoretical premises and aesthetic trends that have marked its development. Beginning with the arrival of sound and ending with the return to popular genres (melodrama, comedy, horror) in the 1980s and ’90s, the readings and film screenings will illustrate, among other points, the question of national cinema and of film’s role in promoting the idea of the nation; the struggle for economic viability; the suitability of hermeneutic categories devised for European and Hollywood cinema to the study of Latin America’s film production; the impact of Hollywood cinema, Italian neo-realism and the French New Wave; the continuity/discontinuity of generic paradigms and thematic concerns across time and borders; the dichotomy of art cinema versus popular cinema; the idea of the filmmaker as witness and cinema as an instrument for political and social change; and possible links between film and literature (magical realism), the visual arts (surrealism), and music (tango, bolero). Among the filmmakers whose work will be screened and/or discussed are Luis Buñuel, Glauber Rocha, Jorge Sanjinés, Patricio Guzmán, Maria Luisa Bemberg, and Fernando Solanas. Readings will be in English, but students who wish to read materials in the original Spanish are encouraged to do so, and those fluent enough may also write their papers in Spanish. The coursework will entail regular attendance to lectures and screenings, a midterm paper, and a final paper or exam.

 

98346

FILM 247   Video Strategies

Les LeVeque

. . W . .

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 117

PART

An advanced production course centered on the basic issues (aesthetic, theoretical and technical) related to electronic media production. The course consists of technical instruction, readings, in-class screenings and critiques of student projects.   

 

98349

FILM 248   Framing the Election

Jacqueline Goss

. . . Th .

9:30 - 12:30 pm

AVERY 117

PART

Cross-listed:  American Studies   If a canon of film, video and new media exists, it includes provocative media made in response to presidential elections. Fiction and documentary works like Haskell Wexler’s “Medium Cool,” TVTV’s “Four More Years,” Robert Altman’s “Tanner 88” and “Nashville,” Jason Simon’s “Spin,” DA Pennebaker’s “War Room,” and RTMark’s “voteauction” and “gwbush.com” websites successfully capture the complex narratives and legacies of the last four decades’ election years. Designed to coincide with the months immediately prior and following the US presidential election in November, “Framing the Election” provides a structure for the course participant to capture, process, frame and produce some aspect of presidential politics in terms of one’s own personal experience. Following the chronology of the election, we will use the first two months of the semester to gather source material and consider texts produced out of prior elections. The latter part of the semester is dedicated to the production of films, videos, sound works or internet-based projects made in response to the results of this election. Works may reflect any political persuasion and take any form including documentary, diary, personal essay, fiction and music. Prerequisite: a familiarity with and access to the tools one intends to use to produce work.   

 

98351

FILM 307   Landscape & Media

Peter Hutton

. . . . F

1:30 -4:30 pm

AVERY 319

PART

A class designed for Junior level film and video majors. The class will study and compare representations of the American landscape through the history of film and painting vs. the depiction of landscape and environmental issues manifest through television and video. Students will be required to complete a short film or video every two weeks referencing sites visited. Required reading: B. McKibbon’s The Age of Missing Information.

 

   98486

FILM 318   Film as Art: The Classical Theories

John Pruitt

M . . .

. . . Sun .

1:30 –  4:30 pm

7:00 - 10:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 117

AART

(Screening)

A survey devoted to the major theories of film from the so-called "classical period" (largely the first half of the twentieth century), when both critics and writer/filmmakers were manifestly trying to establish a groundwork for how to think of the relatively new medium of cinema as an expressive form worthy by itself of serious consideration among its more established sister arts. Class discussions will primarily evolve from close readings of sometimes highly complex aesthetic arguments that think through the properties of the medium. We will scrutinize the answers to various questions such as: Can what is deemed "cinematic" ever be isolated from other art forms? Can film be thought of as constituting a language? Select film screenings will support our understanding of the written texts. A number of readings will offer a more general philosophical questioning of the nature of art itself, since cinema seems to invite speculation that technology and modern consciousness may have brought dramatically new pressures to bear on aesthetic thinking. Writers to be discussed include C. S. Peirce, Benedetto Croce, Ferdinand de Saussure, Hugo Munsterberg, Erwin Panofsky, Sergei Eisenstein, Rudolf Arnheim, Siefried  Kracauer, Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Hollis Frampton, Andrei Tarkovsky, Laura Mulvey, Walter Benjamin, Andre Bazin, Susan Sontag, Gilles Deleuze, Umberto Eco, Christian Metz, et al. Limited to upper college students who preferably have taken at least one course in film history. A required short mid-term essay and an extended written term project.    

 

98352

FILM 319   Film Aesthetics: Women's

Experimental Cinema

Ed Halter

. . . . F

. . . Th .

10:00 – 1:00 pm

7:00 - 10:00 pm

AVERY 217

AVERY 117

AART

(Screening)

Cross-listed:  Gender & Sexuality Studies  A critical analysis of experimental film and electronic art produced by women. Artists studied will include Ackerman, Cha, Rainer, Menken, Friedrich, Wieland, Mihn-ha, Mendieta, Thornton, Subrin, Colburn and Benning, among others. The course will investigate the relationship of experimental production to topics in feminist film theory, including ideas of female authorship, representation, spectatorship, transgression, postcolonialism, queer identity, gender performance, cyberfeminism, and “post-feminism.”   

 

98345

FILM 328   Cinematic Adaptation

Marie Regan

. T . . .

1:30 - 4:30 pm

AVERY 338

PART

Is adaptation translation or response? This workshop takes on all kinds of inspirational forms:  music, science, painting, literature, dance, philosophy etc. and uses them as roots for cinematic adaptation.  We'll explore the process of adaptation by looking at a number of different works and their source materials then, through a series of exercises, students will engage an outside work and not simply translate it to film, but respond to the initial work in their adaptation.     

 

98458

FILM 336   Notes of the Cinematographer

Jacqueline Goss

. .  . .F

9:30 - 12:30 pm

AVERY 117

PART

"Provoke the unexpected. Expect it." "Make the objects look as if they want to be there." "Build your film on white, on silence, and on stillness." "Debussy himself used to play with the piano's lid down." Robert Bresson's elliptical and influential book "Notes on the Cinematographer" contains twenty-five years of the French director's memos, observations, and critiques of his own filmmaking. With these brief aphorisms, one discerns his philosophy of filmmaking and its relationship to theater, painting, music, literature, and nature. Using "Notes On the Cinematographer" as our guide, course participants will produce

a series of short film/video works in response to specific "directives" chosen from Bresson's book. We will also view Bresson's films "A Man Escapes," "Pickpocket," "Mouchette," and "Au Hasard Balthazar" as iterations of the ideas expressed in "Notes" and use these as texts to respond to with our own productions. Through these exercises, course participants will develop a deeper understanding of Bresson's work and develop their own personal philosophies of cinema. A final project that is designed, shot and edited during the second half of the semester is required of each student. All genres of film and videomaking are welcome and expected. Prerequisite: FM201/202 or comparable experience shooting and editing film or video.   

 

98347

FILM 405   Senior Seminar

Les LeVeque

. . W . .

6:00 -8:00 pm

AVERY 117

 

0 credits As a newly established component of the Film Program's requirements for all majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among the seniors working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film.