The German Immersion program will be offered in the Spring 2008 semester, therefore Basic German (101-102) will not be offered in the fall of 2007.  Students interested in the Immersion course should contact Professor Kempf early in the fall semester.

German Immersion:

Intensive study (12 credits) of a foreign language helps to create a highly effective and exciting learning environment for those who wish to achieve a high degree of proficiency in the shortest possible time. German immersion is designed to enable students with little or no previous experience in German to complete two years of college German within five months (spring semester at Bard, plus June in Germany for 4 additional credits). To achieve this goal, students take fifteen class hours per week during the semester at Bard, and twenty hours per week during June at Collegium Palatinum, the German language institute of Schiller International University in Heidelberg. Each participant will be able to enroll concurrently in one other course at Bard. This will allow the student to pursue a more balanced study program or to fulfill certain requirements (e.g., First Year Seminar).

 

Course

GER 110   Transitional German

Professor

Stephanie Kufner

CRN

97090

 

Schedule

M T W Th Fr   11:55 - 12:55 pm  OLINLC 208

Distribution

Foreign Language, Literature & Culture

This course is for students with varied backgrounds in German whose proficiency is not yet on the level of Ger 201. While the emphasis will be on a complete review of elementary grammar, all four language skills (speaking, comprehension, reading, writing), as well as cultural proficiency, will be honed. Extensive comprehension, speaking and vocabulary training exercises in the Language Lab as well as at home will be combined with conversational practice, reading, writing simple compositions, and the dramatization of modern German texts. Successful completion of this accelerated course (covering 3 semesters’ worth of material) will allow students to continue with German 202 in the Spring of 2008. 

 

Course

GER 201   Intermediate German I

Professor

Florian Becker

CRN

97087

 

Schedule

M T Th        12 noon-1:00 pm OLINLC 118

Distribution

Foreign Language, Literature & Culture

For students who have completed a year of college German (or equivalent). The course is designed to deepen the proficiency gained in GER 101 and 102 by increasing students’ fluency in speaking, reading, and writing, and adding significantly to their working vocabulary. Students improve their ability to express their own ideas and hone their strategies for understanding spoken and written communication. Selected 20th-century literary texts and audivisual materials, including an unabridged comedy by Friedrich Dürrenmatt. 

 

Course

GER 309   Sympathy for the Devil: Goethe's Faust

Professor

Franz Kempf

CRN

97043

 

Schedule

Tu Th          2:30 -3:50 pm      OLINLC 120

Distribution

Foreign Language, Literature & Culture

An intensive study of Goethe's drama about a man in league with the devil. The dynamics of Faust's striving for knowledge of the world and experience of life and Mephistopheles' advancement and subversion of this striving provides the basis for our analysis of the play's central themes, individuality, knowledge and transcendence, in regard to their meaning in Goethe's time and their relevance for our time. To gain a fuller appreciation of the variety, complexity, and dramatic fascination of Goethe's Faust, we will also consider Faust literature before and after Goethe and explore the integration of Faust in music, theater, and film (e.g. Arrigo Boito's opera Mefistofele, Friedrich W. Murnau's film Faust).  Taught in English. Students with an advanced proficiency in German who want to read  (some of) the texts in the original can sign up for a 2 or 4 credit    tutorial in German. Please see instructor for details.

 

Course

GER 387 / LIT 287  Richard Wagner:

The Ring of the Nibelung

Professor

Franz Kempf

CRN

97044

 

Schedule

Tu          10:30 - 11:50 am       OLINLC  120

Fr           10:00 – 11:20 am      OLINLC  120

Fr                12:15 -6:15 pm     CAMPUS WEIS

Distribution

Literature in English

A study of Richard Wagner’s cycle of four immense music dramas. A story about “gods, dwarves (Nibelungs), giants and humans, it has been read and performed as a manifesto for socialism, as a plea for a Nazi-like racialism, as a study of the workings of the human psyche, as forecast of the fate of the world and humankind, as a parable about the new industrial society of Wagner’s time.” As we travel down the Rhine and across the rainbow and on through the underworld, our tour-guides will be Heinrich Heine, the Brothers Grimm, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, as well as the anonymous author of the medieval epic, the Nibelungenlied. Musical expertise neither expected nor provided. Taught in English. Students with an advanced proficiency in German who want to read  (some of) the texts in the original can sign up for a 2 or 4 credit tutorial in German. Please see instructor for details.

 

Course

GER 410   Revolution in German Literature

Professor

Florian Becker

CRN

97088

 

Schedule

Tu Th          4:00 -5:20 pm      OLINLC 118

Distribution

Foreign Language, Literature & Culture

Cross-listed: Human Rights

In 1834, the poet Heinrich Heine warned his (French) audience that “a play” was soon to “be performed in Germany” that would “make the French Revolution look like a harmless idyll.” The fusion of politics and aesthetics in Heine’s prediction points to the central place that the problem of revolution occupied in German literature from the late 18th century to the end of the 20th century. This seminar will undertake a close examination of novellas, plays, and poems about several political revolutions. Do these texts figure revolutionary violence as a manifestation of genuine political agency or as the terrible price that has to be paid for its eventual achievement? Does revolution necessarily destroy the modes of subjectivity and solidarity that alone could make it successful? What do these texts say about their own status as literature? Do they demand to be read as products of political agency (affirmative or critical), or do they undermine such claims? Authors include Lenz, Kleist, Büchner, Heine, Toller, Brecht, Müller, and Seghers. All readings will be in German. Short seminar presentations and sustained work on writing skills. Conducted in German.