GLOBALIZATION AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (NYC CAMPUS)

Course

BGIA 339   The United Nations

Professor

Barbara Crosette

CRN

97489

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP

In an age of multiple global disorders, the United Nations remains a singular organization, offering venues for international action on everything from avian influenza to nuclear disarmament. In over 60 years of existence, it has evolved, expanded, diversified and experimented -- always looking over its collective shoulder at the big powers, mostly the United States. But the title "UN" is used liberally and too casually by most outsiders. It is not a single entity but a collection of its parts, and knowing what they are, how they work and what they can and cannot do is essential to intelligent analysis of this system, which includes everything from the Security Council to the World Bank. What role does the UN play in world politics? Is the UN still relevant? Where has the UN had the greatest impact and where are its biggest shortcomings? What challenges will it face in the coming years? This course will address these and other questions by analyzing the UN structure and its functions. We will take advantage of our proximity to UN headquarters by bringing in people who work within various parts of the system who can talk practically about the potential and the limitations of their work. We will also hear from some outside, independent monitors of the UN's work and some accredited diplomats from around the world who are based in missions in New York, which is in effect a global capital of diplomacy. The ultimate aim of the course would be to turn out a group of students who are well grounded in the realities of the organization and well placed to write or comment on international events and issues faced collectively by governments.

 

Course

BGIA 342   Power, War and Terror in International Affairs

Professor

Scott Silverstone

CRN

97490

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP

From the Peloponnesian War among the Greek city-states in the 5th century B.C., to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the terrorist attacks of 9/11, and America's invasion of Iraq in 2003, power has remained a central feature of world politics, motivating the behavior of states and nonstate actors alike. Yet the character and distribution of power has changed dramatically since the rise of the modern state system in the 17th century. For nearly two decades now, American primacy has defined the global power structure. This fact is an historic anomaly; at no time in history has any one state amassed the degree of military, economic, and political power the United States now enjoys. In fact, contemporary American foreign policy is premised on the assertion that the United States must sustain its primacy against any potential challengers for the indefinite future. This course explores the character of power and war in this era of American hegemony. We will examine the vigorous debates over the objectives of American power, unilateralism versus multilateralism as rival approaches to exercising power, debates over what military power can actually achieve, and the potential for a global backlash against the United States. Among other specific issues this course will address is the rise of China and India and the implications for global security and economic issues; rogue states and nuclear proliferation; the preventive war option to address shifting threats; the political and strategic future of the Middle East; terrorism as an alternative form of the power struggle and as a type of asymmetric warfare waged by nonstate actors; the continuing problem of humanitarian crises, failed states and intervention in the post-9/11 world; and the changing nature of global energy politics as an acute security issue.

 

Course

BGIA 334  International Human Rights: Sources and Applications

Professor

Alan Sussman

CRN

97484

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

The language of rights, since the 17th century, has played a pivotal role in political discourse, and since the end of the Second World War has assumed an increasingly important position in international law as well. Rights are normally invoked to assert fundamental claims of human dignity or liberty which impose limits upon social and governmental power and control. But upon what authority do rights exist? This is the principal question to be addressed in this course, which will be approached from political, philosophical and legal perspectives. In charting the transformation of natural law to natural rights and human rights, we will read a number of essential works by Cicero, Grotius, Locke, Constant, and Kant, modern observers including Dworkin, Sen, and Meron, and foundational documents such as the United States Bill of Rights, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man, the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Charter of the Nuremberg Tribunal. In the latter part of the course we will read and discuss recent decisions issued by international courts concerning matters of torture, rape, and crimes against humanity and consider the complex relationship among individual responsibilities, obligations of the state and the status of rights in international law.

 

Course

BGIA 310  Realism Reconsidered: Ethics and International Relations

Professor

Joel Rosenthal

CRN

97485

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP

Thucydides punctuates his history of the Peloponnesian war with the quote of the Athenian generals, ‘The strong do what they will, the weak do what they must.’ In the twentieth century, this sentiment is echoed by the great realists, Hans Morganthau and Henry Kissinger, who argued that power and interest were the guideposts for foreign policy. What values guide us as we make choices about the use of force, resolving conflict, promoting human rights, encouraging democracy and participating in international organizations. This course will examine competing claims of morality, reason and power in contemporary international relations.

 

Course

BGIA 330  Reporting on International Affairs

Professor

Michael Moran

CRN

97486

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

This course will put a heavy emphasis on reporting, writing and developing the sensibilities needed for success as an international news correspondent. We will focus heavily on the techniques of the craft, always in the context of contemporary world events and the realities of modern English-language media. A series of lecturers, and a visit to one of New York City's great newsrooms, will be included during the semester. This is not a course for purists, but rather a broad look at a varied, complex discipline. We will examine briefly many of the topics an international journalist will confront today. We also will touch upon the broadcast and Internet skills that no journalist who strives to be in interesting places at interesting times can afford to ignore in this modern world.

 

Course

BGIA TUT  BGIA Core Seminar

Professor

 

CRN

97495

 

Schedule

TBA

Distribution

Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP

The Core Seminar is divided into two parts: 1) major topics in global affairs; and 2) research and writing related to the specific professional internship that the student is undertaking for the duration of the semester. As such, the Core Seminar bridges BGIA’s formal and non-formal educational program, providing students with opportunities to explore major issues in international affairs and providing them with an academic framework to contextualize their professional internship experiences. The format challenges students to develop skills in critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and written and oral expression. The Core Seminar is divided into two parts: 1) major topics in global affairs; and 2) research and writing related to the specific professional internship that the student is undertaking for the duration of the semester. As such, the Core Seminar bridges BGIA’s formal and non-formal educational program, providing students with opportunities to explore major issues in international affairs and providing them with an academic framework to contextualize their professional internship experiences. The format challenges students to develop skills in critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and written and oral expression.