Course

PS 104   International Relations

Professor

Sanjib Baruah

CRN

90086

 

Schedule

Wed Fr       3:00  -4:20 pm     OLIN 202

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW:Social Science

Cross-listed: Global & Int'l Studies, Human Rights 

How does evangelical Christianity impact the United Nations? Why are so many UN peacekeepers from Fiji? Could a book have led to the war in Iraq? Why are most suicide bombers from the educated middle class? This course looks to provide students with an understanding of the hows and whys of state behavior: the "nuts and bolts" of international affairs. Topics will include: international relations theory; how foreign policy is made; international organizations; and some of the "hot" issues in the world today, such as terrorism, preventive war, globalization, and the spread of democracy. The goal of the class is to see how (or if) theories of international relations can explain the "way of the world."    

 

Course

PS 105   Introduction to Comparative Government

Professor

Nara Dillon

CRN

90041

 

Schedule

 Wed Fr      10:30  - 11:50 am OLIN 307

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Related interest: Global & Int'l Studies

The intellectual premise of the field of comparative politics is that we can better understand the politics of almost any country by placing it in its larger, global context. This comparative perspective allows us to address some of the most fundamental questions of politics. What are the different ways in which groups and individuals participate in politics around the world? Why have some countries developed stable democratic political systems, while others experience frequent changes in government, or even revolutions? What relationship does a country’s political organization have with its economic performance, social stability, and relations with other countries? In exploring these and other questions, we will examine advanced industrial democracies (Germany and the United States), communist/post-communist countries (China), and third world countries (Brazil and Iran). This course is a requirement for all political studies majors.

 

Course

PS 115 A  Introduction  to Political Thinking

Professor

Elaine Thomas

CRN

90570

 

Schedule

 Mon Wed  12:00  - 1:20 pm  OLIN 202

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

Related interest: Human Rights

Hobbes or Rousseau? Plato or Locke? Machiavelli or Aristotle? None of the above? Serious political debate and political study are conducted against the background of a shared history of reflection. This is no less true of political thought that aims to break away from ‘the classics’ than of political thought that finds in them a constant resource for both critical and constructive thinking. This course reflects on politics through reading and discussion of a core body of writings. Looking comparatively at texts from diverse historical eras from ancient times to the present, we will critically examine different ways of thinking about key political concepts, such as justice, democracy, authority, and ‘the political.’ We will also reconstruct (and perhaps deconstruct) key strategic alternatives to such enduring questions as the relationship between the state and the individual; the conditions for peaceful political order; and the relationship between political action, intellectual contemplation, and morality. This course is a requirement for all political studies majors.    

 

Course

PS 115 B  Introduction  to Political Thinking

Professor

Elaine Thomas

CRN

90097

 

Schedule

 Mon Wed  1:30  -2:50 pm     OLIN 306

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Social Science

Related interest: Human Rights

Hobbes or Rousseau? Plato or Locke? Machiavelli or Aristotle? None of the above? Serious political debate and political study are conducted against the background of a shared history of reflection. This is no less true of political thought that aims to break away from ‘the classics’ than of political thought that finds in them a constant resource for both critical and constructive thinking. This course reflects on politics through reading and discussion of a core body of writings. Looking comparatively at texts from diverse historical eras from ancient times to the present, we will critically examine different ways of thinking about key political concepts, such as justice, democracy, authority, and ‘the political.’ We will also reconstruct (and perhaps deconstruct) key strategic alternatives to such enduring questions as the relationship between the state and the individual; the conditions for peaceful political order; and the relationship between political action, intellectual contemplation, and morality. This course is a requirement for all political studies majors.    

 

Course

PS 122   American Politics: Issues and Institutions

Professor

Mark Lindeman

CRN

90090

 

Schedule

 Tu Th         1:00  -2:20 pm     OLIN 305

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: American Studies

This course introduces students to the basic institutions and processes of American government. The class is meant to provide students with a grasp of the fundamental dynamics of American politics and the skills to be an effective participant in and critic of the political process. During the semester, we will examine how the government works, interpret current political developments and debates, and consider how to influence the government at various levels.   

 

Course

PS 153   Introduction to Latin American Politics and Society

Professor

Pierre Ostiguy

CRN

90091

 

Schedule

 Tu Th         4:00  -5:20 pm     OLIN 203

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science / Rethinking Difference

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies, LAIS

This course examines political life in Latin America in the postcolonial period. The course covers the entire region but emphasizes the most representative countries: Argentina, Dominican Republic, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Mexico. The overarching purpose of the course is to understand change and continuity in this region. We will endeavor to accomplish this by emphasizing both the historical development of institutions and political actors in Latin America (e.g. the state, capital, labor, the church, the military) as well as the variety of theoretical frameworks that scholars have constructed to understand the dynamics of political development throughout the region (e.g. modernization, dependencia, and political culture). Among the major themes covered in the course are the legacies of European colonialism, state building, revolution, corporatism and populism, military rule, and redemocratization. Open to all students.   

 

Course

PS 214   US-Latin American Relations

Professor

Omar Encarnacion

CRN

90053

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   12:00  -1:20 pm    OLIN 201

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: American Studies; GISP; LAIS

Related interest:  Human Rights

A comprehensive examination of the relationships between the United States and the nations of Latin America, how this process was affected by historical and ideological events, and what possibilities exist for its future. The course is divided into three sections: first, historical overview of the events that shaped U.S.-Latin American relations, emphasizing U.S. military interventions in Latin America, U.S. attempts to establish political and economic hegemony, and U.S. efforts to export democratic government; second, an examination of the principal issues that currently dominate the relations between the U.S. and its southern neighbors: economic integration, trade, drugs, and immigration; third, a close look at the relationships between the United States and three countries of special interest to it and its domestic politics: Cuba, Mexico and Puerto Rico.   

 

Course

PS 222   Dependency, Development and Democracy: Latin American Political Economy

Professor

Omar Encarnacion

CRN

90054

 

Schedule

 Mon Wed  3:00  -4:20 pm     OLIN 201

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

Cross-listed: GISP, Human Rights, LAIS

This course examines the intersection of politics and economics in Latin America. Perhaps unlike any other region of the developing world, economic factors feature prominently in the political development of Latin America.  This is especially the case with respect to democracy, whose fortunes in Latin America for much of the 20th century have been intimately linked to shifting conditions in the world economy. The course is divided into three sections.  The first looks at the political consequences of a variety of economic models implemented in Latin America since the colonial period; from the formation of single crop economies during late 19th century, through the rise of developmentalism during the 1950s-1960s to the advent of neo-liberalism in the 1990s.  The second part looks at a number of political science explanations to account for conditions of economic under-development in Latin America.  The third and last section reviews contemporary developments in Latin American political economy such as economic integration (NAFTA, CAFTA and Mercosur in particular), the consequences of industrial re-structuring on the labor movement, and the role of the United States and international financial organizations (the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund) in the economic life of Latin American nations. Prerequisite: some social science background on Latin America.    

 

Course

PS 239  United Nations and Model UN

Professor

Jonathan Becker

CRN

90443

 

Schedule

Wed            4:30 – 5:50 pm    OLIN 201

Distribution

OLD: n/a

NEW: n/a

Related interest:  GISP, Human Rights

1 credit* The course will be divided into two parts. The first part will explore the history of the United Nations and will introduce students to its structure and principal aims. It will also focus on the role of specialized agencies and the ways in which alliances impact on the UN’s day-to-day operations. The second part of the course will focus on an assigned country (for each Model UN, each college is assigned a country to represent: this year Bard  represented Azerbaijan and Moldova). It will entail a study of the country’s history, politics and economics and will conclude with the writing of ‘position papers’ that reflect that country’s approach to issues confronting the UN. In addition, there will be a public speaking component. Students taking the course will have the opportunity to participate in a Model United Nations. Students wishing to participate should e-mail jbecker@bard.edu with 1-2 paragraphs indicating why they would like to participate.

*One credit per semester, two-credit course. Students must take both halves to obtain credit.    

 

Course

PS 247   American Foreign Policy Traditions

Professor

Walter Mead

CRN

90101

 

Schedule

 Th              7:00  -9:20 pm     OLIN 202

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

Cross-listed: Global & Int’l Studies, Human Rights

This course will be an introduction to the history of American foreign policy and to the connections between foreign policy and domestic policy that have developed throughout the course of American history. Students will be introduced to the principal geopolitical, economic and ideological pillars that have shaped American strategic thought. Particular attention will be devoted to how popular religious, cultural and political movements have attempted to influence American foreign policy, including anti-war movements: What, for example, are the similarities between today’s anti-war movements and those that have existed since the War of 1812? In the context of the course, students will be asked to read key documents that have defined American foreign policy.

 

Course

PS 256   Politics and News Media

Professor

Jonathan Becker

CRN

90093

 

Schedule

 Mon Wed  10:30  - 11:50 am OLIN 107

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

PIE Core course

Related interest: Global & Int’l Studies, Social Policy

This course examines broad questions about the relationship between the news media and politics. It addresses the interaction between government and news media, concentrating on the characteristics of different national media systems, legal regulation of the media, the impact of corporate ownership and globalization, and the role of new media technologies. Particular attention will be devoted to the role of media in elections and restrictions related to national security concerns. A little more than half of the course will be devoted to media and the system of political communication in the United States. The rest of the course will involve thematic comparisons of media in a number countries, including Russia, Hungary, Sweden, Italy, Germany, the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.   

 

Course

PS 258   Strategies of Radical Political  and Social Change

Professor

Pierre Ostiguy

CRN

90092

 

Schedule

 Mon Wed  8:00  -9:20 pm     ASP 302

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: Human Rights, Sociology

Related interest: GISP

How can we change the political condition of society? A century ago, Lenin concisely asked ‘What is to be Done?’ Can we achieve political change through force of will, organization, and political strategies, as ‘Che’ Guevara or Mao, on the left, argued? Or is long-lasting political change a product of slower, more ‘passive’ transformations of the social fabric, such as industrialization, increased literacy and education, or the rise of so-called ‘post-materialist values’? Somewhere between will and structure, social scientists have highlighted the importance of historical repertoires of collective action in the form our protests take, while Gramscians have stressed the need to think about hegemony, cultural traditions, and the ‘role of the party’ or political organization. This course examines various strategies designed to trigger and achieve social and political change. Within the voluntaristic views, two drastically opposed strategies have existed for a long time: violence as a trigger of change, and non-violent strategies. Which one is more effective? Which one more ethical? We will look at and discuss, for example, the guerrilla strategy used historically in Latin America. Such armed struggles are then compared to non-violent strategies, from Gandhi to contemporary civil disobedience. While there are certainly ethical reasons for choosing one over the other, we will also discuss key factors such as state penetration of society, stricter and more standardized legal codes, as well as developments in law enforcement technologies.   

 

Course

PS 265   Congress: Campaigns and Policymaking

Professor

Mark Lindeman

CRN

90096

 

Schedule

 Tu Th         10:30  - 11:50 am OLIN 205

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  Social Policy

By constitutional design, the U.S. Congress ‘ particularly the House of Representatives ‘ is the branch of the federal government most often and directly accountable to the citizens who elect its members. It is also the least trusted of the major government institutions ‘ and yet, its members usually win reelection. Who are the people whom Americans choose to make our laws, and why are we so ambivalent about them? We will consider how Congress is organized and how it has changed over time, how it is influenced by various forms of lobbying, and how it interacts with the executive and judicial branches. We will pay special attention to the impact of Republican control of Congress since the ‘Republican Revolution’ of 1994, and to the ongoing congressional campaigns culminating in November.    

 

Course

PS 268   Revenge and the Law

Professor

Roger Berkowitz

CRN

90119

 

Schedule

 Tu Th         1:00  -2:20 pm     OLIN 101

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: Human Rights

To speak of revenge in a course on law is to lay bare an open wound at the heart of law. On the one hand, law is built upon the exclusion of vengeance. On the other hand, revenge remains a constant presence in criminal law. In spite of the best efforts of philosophers, moralists, and jurists to banish it, revenge remains an irrepressible social and legal force. This course asks the question: Can revenge be a just motive for criminal punishment? By considering those in the victims’ rights movements who argue for the importance and justice of “legalizing” and thus legitimating revenge, we ask whether justice is actually something other than legalized revenge. To do so, we explore the phenomenon of revenge as it has been practiced, imagined, and conceived throughout history. Through a close reading of texts, films, and works of art, we will ask: why does revenge persist as an ideal of justice despite the best efforts of lawyers to banish it?    

 

Course

PS 270  The Power of Healing: The  Politics of Medicine in East Asia

Professor

Nara Dillon

CRN

90095

 

Schedule

 Tu Th         10:30  - 11:50 am OLIN 307

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed: GISP, Asian Studies

This course examines the history, culture, and politics of health, disease, and medicine in East Asia. The first part of the course focuses on the development of East Asian healing traditions, with a particular emphasis on traditional Chinese medicine. The second part of the course explores the political conflicts that ensued after the introduction of Western biomedicine to the region. In addition to tracing the impact of these conflicts on ideas, institutions, and practices in East Asia (primarily China, Japan and Korea), we will also look at parallel conflicts in the United States over acupuncture and other Asian medical practices. The third part of the course focuses on a variety of contemporary issues in the politics of medicine in East Asia, including public health, family planning, mental health, and newly emerging diseases. Course readings are drawn from the disciplines of history, anthropology, sociology, and political science.

 

Course

PS 311   Immigration & Citizenship

Professor

Elaine Thomas

CRN

90098

 

Schedule

Tu               1:00  -3:20 pm     OLIN 303

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science / Rethinking Difference

Cross-listed:  GISP, Human Rights, Social Policy, SRE

Related interest:  French Studies, German Studies

PIE Core course

This course examines the ways that responses to immigration have affected existing policies and practices of citizenship. The course will focus primarily on the post-World War II experience of developed countries and the practical and theoretical issues it has raised. One of the challenges that migration to these countries has presented has been that of politically integrating culturally and religiously diverse new social groups of immigrant origin. The course will explore the often contrasting ways in which different countries have confronted this task and the historical, social, and intellectual roots of variations in their approaches, and levels of enthusiasm. Topics addressed include multiculturalism, minority rights, visions of state and nationhood, nationality law, alien voting rights, migration-related social movements, and citizenship of the EU.   

 

Course

PS 330   Politics of Democratization

Professor

Omar Encarnacion

CRN

90057

 

Schedule

 Tu              4:00 – 6:20 pm    OLIN 310

Distribution

OLD: A/C

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  GISP, Human Rights; PIE Core course

The American invasion of Iraq and the attempt to implant democracy in the very heart of the Middle East has awakened interest in the politics of democratization. Underlying this interest is a cluster of questions and inquiries such as what makes for a successful transition from dictatorship to democracy? Can democracy be successfully imposed from the outside? What kind of governing institutions (parliamentary versus presidential, for instance) are best suited for a new democracy? Is the stability and longevity of democracy the result of structural factors such as the level of social and economic development, the density of civil society or the talents of politicians? These questions are examined in this seminar through the lenses of the expansive literature on democratization accumulated since the late 1970s. The course is divided into three main sections. The first looks at key concepts in the study of democratization. The second examines theoretical approaches to understanding the sources of democratic stability and performance. The final section examines the politics of democratization in four distinct historical and geographic settings: Spain, Brazil, Russia and Iraq.   

 

Course

PS 347  Civil Society and Democracy in Africa

Professor

Geoffrey Nyarota

CRN

90449

 

Schedule

Th               1:30  -3:50 pm     OLIN 306

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Social Science

This course examines the extent to which freedom of expression has empowered civil society and opposition political parties in challenging threats to democracy in various states on the African sub-continent. Where authoritarian regimes have curtailed the right of civil society to freedom of expression and prevented the media from effectively playing their role as a watchdog over government and as a cornerstone of democracy, abuse of human rights, poverty, corruption and a general decline in living standards have proliferated. The course will analyze case studies of countries where civil society, working in tandem with the political opposition, the media, the church, the trade unions and the judiciary, have effectively challenged dictatorship. We will also investigate the role of censorship and ownership of mass media by government, as well as the complex role of Western NGOs and media coverage in the struggles of post-colonial Africa.  A number of southern African countries, which have endured threats to democracy under the rule of authoritarian regimes will be considered case studies during this course, while parts played by the forces of resistance will also be highlighted.

 

Course

PS 349   Bard – West Point Seminar: The Nature of Power

Professor

Jonathan Cristol

CRN

90886

 

Schedule

Wed   4:30 – 6:50 pm   OLIN 205

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: History

Hans Morgenthau, one of the preeminent international relations theorists, wrote in his “Six Principles of Political Realism” that, “power may comprise anything that establishes and maintains control of man over man.  Thus power covers all social relationships which serve that end, from physical violence to the most subtle psychological ties by which one mind controls another.”  This seminar will investigate “physical violence,” “subtle psychological ties,” and everything in between in an attempt to understand the nature and role of power in the state system.  The seminar will focus on the great books of international relations that explore power in all of the major schools of international relations theory.  Each week we will read and discuss one of the major books on power and the international system, including: Morgenthau’s Politics Among Nations, Mearsheimer’s The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, Zakaria’s From Wealth to Power, Nye’s Soft Power, Keohane’s Power and Interdependence, and Kagan’s Of Paradise and Power, among others. Our debates on the nature and use of power will benefit from joint sessions with Professor Scott Silverstone and his students at the United States Military Academy, West Point.  (Approximately one third of class meetings will be with West Point cadets.)
Prerequisite:  PS 104 or the permission of the instructor.

Please note:  This class will occasionally travel by van to West Point for 7:35 am classes and on two days during term will spend the bulk of the day there.  It will also require reading one book per week.  Please be sure the class fits into your schedule before you register.

 

Course

PS 361   The Great Asian Transformation

Professor

Sanjib Baruah

CRN

90094

 

Schedule

 Fr               9:30  - 11:50 am  OLIN 107

Distribution

OLD: 

NEW: Social Science

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies, GISP

There has been much interest lately in what appears to be a global shift in economic power towards Asia.  The dramatic economic growth of Asian countries -- notably of China and India -- undoubtedly will have consequences for global politics. But it would be misleading to view it entirely through traditional state-centric lenses, for there is a change in the spatial organization of the world economy. After all, manufacturing in Asia is incorporated into the global supply chains of transnational companies, and for many such companies a technology hub in Asia is a link in a global innovation chain.  It has also become difficult to draw sharp lines between countries and their neighborhoods. A number of East Asian countries and the overseas Chinese for instance, are a part of the story of China's transformation. The course will look closely at these dimensions of the Asian transformation and ask a few long-term questions: Can this pattern be sustained? What are its consequences for the well being of the people in the region and elsewhere? How would one make sense of this shift in world historical terms?