Course

GRE 101 Basic Greek I

Professor

James Romm

CRN

90129

 

Schedule

Mon Wed 10:30 - 11:30 am OLIN 306

Tu Th 10:30 11:30 am PRE 101

Distribution

OLD: D

NEW: Foreign Language, Literature, Culture

Ancient Greek is the language of the epics of Homer, the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, the comedies of Aristophanes, the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, etc. In this course, students will learn the grammar of Greek and acquire a fundamental vocabulary. Attention will also be given to pronunciation and recitation of poetry and prose. Discussions of Greek culture and thought will occasionally result. In the second half of the Spring semester we will read substantial portions of

Euripides' play Alcestis.

 

Course

GRE 201 Intermediate Greek

Professor

Carolyn Dewald

CRN

90130

 

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 -2:50 pm OLIN 304

Distribution

OLD: D

NEW: Foreign Language, Literature, Culture

The third and fifth semesters of Ancient Greek meet together. We will read extensively in Homer's Odyssey. For students

in both semesters the goals are: (1) to solidify knowledge of vocabulary, morphology, and syntax, in the context of Homeric Greek; (2) to gain greater fluency in reading Greek, and managing the dactylic hexameter; and (3) to better understand the language, its first literature, and the archaic culture that produced it. Third-semester students are encouraged to begin working with Liddell's and Scott's intermediate lexicon; fifth-semester students are required to use the lexicon and are responsible for additional work. Prerequisite: successful completion of either Greek 102 or Greek 202, or permission of instructor.

 

Course

GRE 301 Advanced Greek

Professor

Carolyn Dewald

CRN

90131

 

Schedule

Mon Wed 1:30 -2:50 pm OLIN 304

Distribution

OLD: D

NEW: Foreign Language, Literature, Culture

The third and fifth semesters of Ancient Greek meet together. We will read extensively in Homer's Odyssey. For students

in both semesters the goals are: (1) to solidify knowledge of vocabulary, morphology, and syntax, in the context of Homeric Greek; (2) to gain greater fluency in reading Greek, and managing the dactylic hexameter; and (3) to better understand the language, its first literature, and the archaic culture that produced it. Third-semester students are encouraged to begin working with Liddell's and Scott's intermediate lexicon; fifth-semester students are required to use the lexicon and are responsible for additional work. Prerequisite: successful completion of either Greek 102 or Greek 202, or permission of instructor.