Course

FILM 109A   The History and Aesthetics of Film

Professor

Gerard Dapena

CRN

90231

 

Schedule

Tu (screening)  7:00 - 10:00 pm  Avery 110

Th               9:30 – 12:30 pm  Avery 217

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Art

A one-semester survey course comprising weekly screenings and lectures designed for first-year students, especially those who are considering film as a focus of their undergraduate studies. Films by Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Rossellini, Hitchcock, Deren, and others are studied. Readings of theoretical works by authors including Vertov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Munsterberg, Bazin, and Arnheim. This course is for first-year students only.

 

Course

FILM 109B   The History and Aesthetics of Film

Professor

John Pruitt

CRN

90868

 

Schedule

Wed (screening)  7:00 - 10:00 pm  Avery 110

Th                   1:30 -4:30 pm   Avery 217

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Analysis of Art

A one-semester survey course comprising weekly screenings and lectures designed for first-year students, especially those who are considering film as a focus of their undergraduate studies. Films by Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Rossellini, Hitchcock, Deren, and others are studied. Readings of theoretical works by authors including Vertov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Munsterberg, Bazin, and Arnheim. This course is for first-year students only..

 

Course

FILM 167   Survey of Media Art

Professor

Ed Halter

CRN

90225

 

Schedule

Mon            1:30 -4:30 pm      Avery 110

Sun screening  7:00 - 10:00 pm  Avery 110

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Analysis of Art

An introduction to the history of moving-image art made with electronic media, with a focus on avant-garde traditions. Topics include video art, guerrilla television, expanded cinema, feminist media, Net art, music video, microcinema, digital feature filmmaking and art made from video games. This course is for first-year students only.

 

Course

FILM 201 A    Introduction  to the Moving Image: Video

Professor

Les LeVeque

CRN

90226

 

Schedule

Th               9:00 -12:00 pm     Avery 338

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

Introduction to the basic problems (technical and theoretical) related to film and/or electronic motion picture production. Coupled with Film 202 (offered in Spring), this course is designed to be taken in the sophomore year and leads to a spring Moderation project in the Film and Electronic Arts Program. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200- level course in Film or Video History.

 

Course

FILM 201 B     Introduction  to the Moving Image: Video

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

CRN

90229

 

Schedule

 Wed           9:30 - 12:30 pm   Avery 117

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

Introduction to the basic problems (technical and theoretical) related to film and/or electronic motion picture production. Coupled with Film 202 (offered in Spring), this course is designed to be taken in the sophomore year and leads to a spring Moderation project in the Film and Electronic Arts Program. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200- level course in Film or Video History.

 

Course

FILM 201 C    Introduction  to the Moving Image: Film

Professor

Peter Hutton

CRN

90232

 

Schedule

Th               1:30 -4:30 pm      Avery 319

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

Introduction to the basic problems (technical and theoretical) related to film and/or electronic motion picture production. Coupled with Film 202 (offered in Spring), this course is designed to be taken in the sophomore year and leads to a spring Moderation project in the Film and Electronic Arts Program. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200- level course in Film or Video History.

 

Course

FILM 201 D    Introduction  to the Moving Image: Film

Professor

Kelly Reichardt

CRN

90233

 

Schedule

Th               9:00 - 12:00 pm    Avery 319

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

Introduction to the basic problems (technical and theoretical) related to film and/or electronic motion picture production. Coupled with Film 202 (offered in Spring), this course is designed to be taken in the sophomore year and leads to a spring Moderation project in the Film and Electronic Arts Program. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200- level course in Film or Video History.

 

Course

FILM 203  Electronic Media Workshop:   Sound and Image

Professor

Les LeVeque

CRN

90434

 

Schedule

 Wed           1:30 -4:30 pm      Avery 333

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

This production course examines the major aesthetic elements of the visual and the aural. The primary focus is the artful juxtaposition of sound and image through the production of short film / video projects. The course consists of technical instruction, readings, in-class screenings and critiques of student projects.

 

Course

FILM 211   Screenwriting I

Professor

Marie Regan

CRN

90227

 

Schedule

Tu               4:00 -7:00 pm      Avery 338

Distribution

OLD: B/F

NEW: Practicing Arts

An intensive workshop for committed writers/cineasts. From an idea to plot, from an outline to full script ‘ character development and dramatic/cinematic structure. Continuous analysis of students’ work in a seminar setting. Students who wish to participate in this workshop should have a demonstrable background in film or in writing, and be able to share their work with others. Limited enrollment, priority given to Sophomores and Juniors, or by permission of the professor. Submission of work and/or an interview prior to registration is recommended.

 

Course

FILM 218   Theories of Film

Professor

Gerard Dapena

CRN

90441

 

Schedule

Tu   10:00 am – 12:50 pm  AVERY 217

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Analysis of Art

Theories of Film is designed as an introduction to some of the major developments in classic and contemporary film theory and criticism. The course covers key texts and authors (Kracauer, Eisenstein, Bazin, Metz, Mulvey, Bordwell) and examines the cultural contexts that gave rise to these debates and arguments. Among the issues under review: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; the way meaning is constructed in the process of viewing a film; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; the representation of women and racial and sexual minorities; and the formation of film canons and hierarchies. The syllabus pairs writings on a central principle of film analysis with cinematic examples (one or more feature films or shorts) that allow students to apply and/or question the main ideas presented in the various readings. Class time will be divided between discussion of the critical texts and the projection of sequences that may clarify the ideas and debates at hand.

 

Course

FILM 247   Video Strategies

Professor

Les LeVeque

CRN

90291

 

Schedule

Th               1:30 -4:30 pm      Avery 333

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Art

An advanced production course centered on the basic issues (aesthetic, theoretical and technical) related to electronic media production. The course consists of technical instruction, readings, in-class screenings and critiques of student projects.

Course

FILM 278   Film Production Workshop

Professor

Kelly Reichardt

CRN

90435

 

Schedule

Wed  1:30 – 4:30 pm               Avery 319

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Art

This class functions as a rotating production team: the talent, imagination, and industry of class members combine in the creation of an original 16mm film. Each student has an opportunity to write, direct, and edit one scene, and act as crew or cast in other scenes. Issues of art direction, narrative continuity, and collaboration are addressed as they arise. The primary goal is for students to develop technical and storytelling proficiency through working in a variety of roles in a film production.

 

Course

FILM 301   MC: Live Video & Surveillance

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

CRN

90370

 

Schedule

Tu   1:30 – 4:30 pm  AVERY 116

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: Practicing Arts

Cross-listed: Human Rights; Integrated Arts; Science, Technology & Society

This is a course intended to give students a better understanding of live video production as a vehicle for artistic expression. Course participants develop ways of working with video's most unique property: its ability to produce an immediate and continuous stream of images and sounds. Surveillance, streaming media, spinning, call-in talk shows, and cell phone usage have primed audiences and spectators to expect immediate access to and feedback from their media. How does the media artist respond? Course participants will work on individual projects using cameras, monitors, switchers, surveillance systems, and software-based video mixers. We will also work collectively to produce one live piece which will be broadcast to an audience. In addition, we will carry on a continued discussion about the larger cultural and psychological impact of live video production. This conversation will be supplemented by readings and viewings of work by Nam Jun Paik, Richard Serra, Dan Graham, Rosalind Krauss, Raymond Carver, Julia Scher, the Surveillance Camera Players, and others. Please contact goss@bard.edu for information.

 

Course

FILM 307   Landscape & Media

Professor

Peter Hutton

CRN

90234

 

Schedule

 Fr               1:30 -4:30 pm      Avery 117

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: Practicing Arts

A class designed for Junior level film and video majors. The class will study and compare representations of the American landscape through the history of film and painting vs. the depiction of landscape and environmental issues manifest through television and video. Students will be required to complete a short film or video referencing these issues. Required reading: B. McKibbon’s The Age of Missing Information.

 

Course

FILM 319   The American Graphic Film: Abstraction, Animation and Collage

Professor

John Pruitt

CRN

90290

 

Schedule

Mon screening  7:00 - 10:00 pm  Avery 110

Tu               1:30 -4:30 pm      Avery 217

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW:

Cross-listed:  Integrated Arts

The seminar will provide an in-depth study of a significant tradition within the American avant-garde film that connects quite directly to modernist practice in the graphic arts, particularly painting and printmaking. Most of the films under discussion eschew dramatic narrative for imagery that provides a direct "adventure of visual perception." Because the images move over time, we will inevitably have to deal with intricate matters of abstract musical form, in many cases a deep source of inspiration for these artists. Other theoretical issues to be discussed include the intention behind the drive towards visual abstraction in the first place, and the inherent tension within a photographic medium between the so-called real and the imagined. At first we will focus on the works of several "classic" practitioners who worked primarily in the 50's, 60's and 70's: Joseph Cornell, Harry Smith, John and James Whitney, Robert Breer, Larry Jordan, Pat O'Neill, Jordan Belson, Bruce Conner, George Landow, Paul Sharits and Stan Brakhage. We will then turn our attention to a younger generation who emerged from the 80's onwards and are still quite active today: Jennifer Reeves, Mark Street, Michele Smith, Eve Heller, Craig Baldwin, Lewis Sklar et al. Open primarily but not exclusively to juniors and seniors; there is no prerequisite course but priority will be given those students with background in film, studio arts, or art history. Weekly screenings and required readings. Term paper project. 

 

Course

FILM 328   Cinematic Adaptation

Professor

Marie Regan

CRN

90499

 

Schedule

 Wed   9:30 am - 12:30 pm     Avery 338

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: Practicing Arts

Is adaptation translation or response? This workshop takes on all kinds of inspirational forms:  music, science, painting, literature, dance, philosophy etc. and uses them as roots for cinematic adaptation.  We'll explore the process of adaptation by looking at a number of different works and their source materials then, through a series of exercises, students will engage an outside work and not simply translate it to film, but respond to the initial work in their adaptation. 

 

Course

FILM 405   Senior Seminar

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

CRN

90230

 

Schedule

 Wed           6:00 -8:00 pm      Avery 217

Distribution

OLD: n/a

NEW:

0 credit As a newly established component of the Film Program's requirements for all majors, the Senior Seminar is an opportunity to share working methods, knowledge, skills and resources among the seniors working on Senior Project. The course will have a number of film and video makers in to discuss their process and techniques, artistic life-after-Bard skills workshop, a review of distribution and grant writing opportunities and critique of works in progress. The course is an integral aspect of Senior Project for all seniors in Film.