Course

BIO 123   Sex and Gender

Professor

Felicia Keesing

CRN

90371

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   10:30 - 11:50 am  Hegeman 102

 

Tu (Lab A)  9:00 - 12:00 pm   Rose 305/HDR

or

Tu (Lab B)  1:30 -4:30 pm      Rose 305/HDR

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

Cross-listed: Gender and Sexuality Studies

Why are there so many differences in the social behaviors of men and women? Why are there two sexes? Why do women get depressed more often than men but commit suicide less often? Why are women, on average, shorter than men? Why do they live longer? Students in this course, intended for nonscientists, examine the biological bases of sex and gender. They consider evidence for hypotheses that attempt to explain differences in behavior between males and females, including data from behavioral studies on both humans and other animals. The genetic and hormonal determinants of sex and gender are investigated, and the arguments for how and why sex evolved in the first place are considered, especially in light of the strong evolutionary advantages of self-cloning. No specific science or mathematics background beyond algebra is required.

 

Course

BIO 130   Field Study in Natural History

Professor

William Maple

CRN

90372

 

Schedule

Tu Th          1:30 -5:00 pm      Hegeman 308

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

Cross-listed:  Environmental Studies

Designed to acquaint the interested nonscience student with the plants and animals that make the Bard campus their home, including trees and shrubs in their winter condition and fall wildflowers.  Animal tracks and bird migrations also are objects of study. Although the course includes some lab work on preserved specimens, especially during severe weather, most class meetings are field trips. Participants must have clothing appropriate to the weather and terrain: good walking shoes or boots, warm clothing and rain gear. Some Saturday field trips and early morning meetings may be required. Limited to 10 students.

 

Course

BIO 141 A   Subcellular Biology

Professor

John Ferguson

CRN

90373

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   2:20 -4:20 pm      Hegeman 102

Th (Lab A)  9:00 am – 12:00 pm Rose 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Laboratory Science

(Note: This course has a choice of lab sections.  See below.)

An introductory survey of life at the cellular level primarily intended for prospective biology majors, but also open to interested students not majoring in science. Beginning with an introduction to the evolution and complexity of life, including the prokaryotes and the viruses, the course proceeds to examine the commonality of life at both the biochemical and cellular levels. A central section deals with energy transfer in living systems (fermentation, respiration, and photosynthesis), followed by another major section dealing with information transfer (genetics, nucleic acid replication, transcription, and translation). The course ends with discussions of more complex topics (genetic engineering, human genetics, and immunology). The laboratory portion of the course provides an introduction to the methodologies and instrumentation found in the modern biology lab. This course is appropriate for those interested in a career in the health professions and others interested in a broadly based view of modern biology. Offered every fall. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in Chemistry 141 concurrently. Prerequisite: eligibility for Q courses, and experience in high school biology and chemistry.

 

Course

BIO 141 B   Subcellular Biology

Professor

John Ferguson

CRN

90492

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   2:20 -4:20 pm      Hegeman 102

Th (Lab B)  1:30 pm – 4:30 pm   Rose 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Laboratory Science

(Note: This course has a choice of lab sections.  See above.)

 

Course

BIO 201   Eukaryotic Genetics

Professor

Michael Tibbetts

CRN

90374

 

Schedule

Wed Fr       9:00 - 10:20 am   ALBEE 106

 

Fr (Lab A)  1:00 -3:00 pm      Hegeman 308

or

Fr (Lab B)  3:00 -5:00 pm      Hegeman 308

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

This course is an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance and the generation of diversity in eukaryotic organisms.  This course takes a modern approach to the study of genetics in which classical ideas about genotype, phenotype and inheritance are integrated into the modern molecular and genomic understanding of the processes involved in the generation of diversity.  In addition to discussions of the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication,  recombination, the generation and repair of mutations, and the relationship between genotype and phenotype, special consideration is given to our understanding of the processes involved in generating population-level variation in complex traits and how this understanding can help us identify the myriad genetic and non-genetic factors influencing these traits.  The laboratory consists of a semester long project involving the genetic manipulation of a model organism’s genome to address one or more topics in the course.  Offered every fall.  Prerequisites: One year of college biology.

 

Course

BIO 206   Botany

Professor

William Maple

CRN

90375

 

Schedule

Wed Fr       3:00 -4:20 pm      Hegeman 201

Wed            9:30 - 12:30 pm   Rose 305

Distribution

OLD: E/G/Q

NEW: Laboratory Science

Cross-listed:  Environmental Studies

This course consists of lectures, labs, and frequent field trips. The first part of the course surveys the plant kingdom and focuses on anatomy, histology, and physiology, with an emphasis on form, function, and adaptation. The last third of the semester covers local flora, taxonomy, and plant ecology. Prerequisites: Biology 141-142, Chemistry 141-142 or permission of the instructor.

 

Course

BIO 303   Microbiology

Professor

John Ferguson

CRN

90377

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   10:30 – 12:30 pm Preston 110

Fri (Lab)       1:30 -   4:30 pm  Rose 306

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

The biology and ecology of the prokaryotes and the viruses.  Every attempt is made to organize the diversity of the prokaryotes into a modern phylogenetic context based on the latest results of molecular evolutionary analyses.  The first portion of the course deals with prokaryotic cell biology and growth, the second with plant viruses, viroids, bacteriophages, animal viruses, and prions, and the third with the diversity of the prokaryotes, ranging from the Archaea through both pathogenic and nonpathogenic Bacteria. Laboratory work provides practical experience in dealing with prokaryotes and bacteriophages. This course is appropriate for both those interested in a career in the health professions and those interested in ecology. Offered in alternate fall semesters; this course is a prerequisite for Biology 310.  Prerequisites: Biology 141-142, Chemistry 141-142;

Chemistry 201-202 is recommended concurrently.

 

Course

BIO 307   Aquatic Ecology

Professor

Catherine O'Reilly

CRN

90376

 

Schedule

Mon            1:00 -5:00 pm      Field Station

Wed            1:30 -2:50 pm      OLIN 202

Distribution

OLD: E/G

NEW: Laboratory Science

Cross-listed:  Environmental Studies

Freshwater ecosystems span a wide range of varied environments. This course will explore the physical and chemical processes that structure these ecosystems and examine how these influence the abundance and diversity of plants and animals. We will subsequently be able to look at how different human activities are affecting our freshwater resources. The course is lab/field work-intensive and will involve studying several lakes, wetlands, streams, and rivers in the area. Prerequisites: Chem 142 and two Biology courses, at least one at the 200 level.

 

Course

BIO 321   Molecular Evolution

Professor

Robert Cutler

CRN

90378

 

Schedule

Mon Wed   2:20 -4:20 pm      HDR 101A

Distribution

OLD: n/a

NEW:

This lecture/lab examines the apparent evolution of nucleotide (and amino acid) sequences in biology and the extent to which species phylogeny can be reliably reconstructed from such sequences. Students learn how to retrieve sequences from computerized data banks, align them, and construct phylogenic trees by parsimony analysis. The course concludes with a project in which the students perform these manipulations on sets of sequences of their own choosing.  Offered in alternate fall semesters. Prerequisites:  Biology 201 and Biology 301.

 

Course

BIO 415   Advanced Seminar in Ecology

Professor

Felicia Keesing

CRN

90379

 

Schedule

Th               9:50 - 11:50 am   OLIN 309

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW: n/a

Cross-listed:  Environmental Studies

Infectious disease involves interactions among at least two species, the pathogen and the host. For many diseases, there is also a vector species. All of these species interact with a multitude of competitors and predators within ecological communities. These ecological interactions play an important role in the transmission of infectious diseases. In this advanced seminar, we will read a combination of current case studies, syntheses, and theory to develop an understanding of the ecology of infectious diseases. Enrollment limited to 10 students. Prerequisite: Ecology.