Course

PHIL 101   Problems in Philosophy

Professor

William Griffith

CRN

95020

 

Schedule

Mon Wed     10:30 -11:50 am    ASP 302

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES

An introduction to the problems, methods, and scope of philosophical inquiry. Among the philosophical questions to be discussed are those associated with morality, the law, the nature of mind, and the limits of knowledge. Philosophers to be read include Plato, Descartes, David Hume, William James, A. J. Ayer, Sartre, C. S. Lewis, and Lon Fuller.

 

Course

PHIL 103  Introduction to Philosophy

Professor

Garry Hagberg

CRN

95841

 

Schedule

Tue Th        1:00 –2:20 pm       OLIN 202

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES

Cross-listed:  Classical Studies

A critical examination of the work of some major figures in the history of philosophy, emphasizing historical continuities and developments in the subject. Authors include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Nietzsche, and Russell.

.

Course

PHIL 104: Introduction to Philosophy:  Multicultural Perspectives

Professor

Daniel Berthold

CRN

95461

 

Schedule

Wed Fr        1:30 -2:50 pm       OLIN 203

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES

This course is an introduction to such major themes in the history of philosophy as the nature of reality and our capacity to know it; issues of ethics and justice; and conceptions of how one should live.  Readings will include selections from a diverse range of traditions, including Western, Hindu, Buddhist, Chinese, African, Native American, and feminist texts.

Course

PHIL 230   Philosophy and the Arts

Professor

Garry Hagberg

CRN

95022

 

Schedule

Mon Wed     3:00 -4:20 pm       OLIN 201

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES

Cross-listed: Integrated Arts

We will critically investigate a wide range of theories and problems in the philosophy of art, emphasizing issues of artistic meaning. Among the topics to be discussed are whether there exists an aesthetic experience unique to the art world; the nature of representation and mimetic theories of art; the role of expression in artistic definition and criticism; formalism and the form/content distinction; the logic of aesthetic evaluation and its relation to ethical argument; and subjectivity and objectivity in aesthetic perception. We will examine both classical and contemporary theories as they apply to questions arising out of architecture, dance, drama, film, literature, music, painting, and photography. No Prerequisites. Open to first year students.

 

Course

PHIL 251   Ethical Theory

Professor

William Griffith

CRN

95023

 

Schedule

Tu Th          10:30 -11:50 am    OLIN 101

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES

What is it to be a “moral” being, i.e., what is the “moral dimension” of our lives?  What are its key elements?  Is there such a thing as “happiness,”  “the good life,” “virtue,” “wisdom?” Are there “rights,” “duties?”  If so, how do we recognize them?  We will critically examine the primary texts of four philosophers whose thoughts on these fundamental questions have had a permanent influence on western philosophical thought:  Aristotle, Epictetus, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill.  (No Prerequisites.  Open to First Year students.)

 

Course

PHIL 260   Feminist Philosophy

Professor

Daniel Berthold

CRN

95024

 

Schedule

Wed Fr        9:00 -10:20 am     OLIN 202

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES / RETHINKING DIFFERENCE

Cross-listed: Gender Studies, Human Rights

The course will examine a variety of feminist philosophical approaches to issues surrounding modern culture's production of images of sexuality and gender.  Some background readings will provide a sketch of a diverse range of feminist theoretical frameworks -- liberal, socialist, radical, psychoanalytic, and postmodern -- with readings from Alison Jaggar, Simone de Beauvoir, Annie Leclerc, Christine Delphy, Julia Kristeva, Luce Irigaray, Sarah Kofman, and Hélène Cixous.  However, this is primarily an "applied" philosophy course rather than a course focusing on theory.  We will explore such issues as the cultural enforcement of both feminine and masculine gender identities, the mass-marketing of popular cultural images of sexuality, gender, and race, the urban environment and women's sense of space, the intersection of feminism and environmentalism, the logic of subjection governing cultural ideals of women's bodies (dieting, exercise, clothing, bodily comportment), issues of rape, sexual violence and harassment, pornography, and feminist perspectives of different ethnic groups.  We will also screen a number of films and videos, including the Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas hearings, Madonna's "Truth or Dare," and documentaries on the pre-Stonewall femme-butch bar-scene culture of the 1950s and 60s, anorexia, rape on campus, the pornographic film industry, and several others. 

 

Course

PHIL 352   Philosophy of Language

Professor

Garry Hagberg

CRN

95025

 

Schedule

Tu               7:00 -9:20 pm       ASP 302

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES

Beginning with the question asking why the study of language is relevant to philosophical inquiry, we will examine a number of arguments for and against taking the “linguistic turn” in recent analytical philosophy, this will lead us to ask whether metaphysical questions are disguised linguistic perplexities and whether linguistic analysis is a viable method for facing traditional philosophical problems. From this point we will turn to mid-century speech-act theory, the development of “Oxford philosophy”, and to a detailed look at the employment of that method in treating questions of sense-perception and knowledge. Lastly, we will consider some recent work on metaphor, including its nature, some of its functions in ethics and aesthetics, and its remarkable power as a shaping influence on our understanding of persons. At the very end of our investigations we should find ourselves equipped to reflect on Wittgenstein’s gnomic utterance: “The limits of my language are the limits of my world.”

 

Course

PHIL 355   Philosphy of Music

Professor

Robert Martin

CRN

95026

 

Schedule

Tu               9:30 -11:50 am     AVERY N210

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES

Philosophical questions about music cluster by topic, such as the following: (1) Definitions and classifications (Are they helpful?); (2) Music and nature (The physiology of pulse and rhythm.  The musical expression of human emotion.  The power of music.  Is tonality natural or conventional?);  (3) Music and language (Parallels and differences.  Toward a theory of music); (4) Music, politics, and ideology.   We will engage these topics through readings, listening to music, seminar presentations (each with a commentator) and class discussions.  Readings include: Plato, Aristotle, Schopenhauer, Hanslick, Wittgenstein and a large number of recent and contemporary writers.  

 

Course

PHIL 357   Law and Ethics

Professor

William Griffith / Alan Sussman

CRN

95019

 

Schedule

Tu               1:30 -3:50 pm       ASP 302

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: HUMANITIES

Cross-listed:  Human Rights

This course will combine elements of two disciplines, law and philosophy, and will be taught jointly by a member of the philosophy program and a constitutional lawyer.  Issues to be studied, broadly conceived, include justice, equality, liberty, and responsibility.  More specifically, these will include affirmative action, sexuality,  the right to die, and the insanity defense.  We shall study opinions of the United States Supreme Court, and judges on Circuit Courts, as well as works by philosophers, including Aristotle, J. S. Mill, John Rawls, H. L. A. Hart, Lon Fuller, Isaiah Berlin, and Ronald Dworkin.   Enrollment limited to 15.  Permission of instructor required.  Priority for admission will be given to students with upper-college standing and/or a previous course in philosophy.