Course

SHP 222†† TheHistory of Science before Newton

Professor

Peter Skiff

CRN

95255

 

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††† 4:00-5:20 pm††††† HEG 102

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW:

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society; Theology

Related interest:Classical Studies

An introduction to the history and philosophy of science. T. S. Kuhn's model of historical progress will be used to examine selected parts of discourses involving pre‑Socratic philosophy, mythology, Copernican astronomy, Galileo's trial, and Newton's philosophy. A critique of method will introduce modern historiographic and philosophic controversy. Designed as a core course for studies in history, philosophy, and sociology of science; no prior mathematical or technical expertise will be presumed at this level. Readings include excerpts from the Enuma Elish, the Milesians, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Plato, Aristotle, Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Newton. Secondary commentary by Nahm, Butterfield, Kuhn, Munitz, and others.

 

Course

SHP 225†† Einstein

Professor

Peter Skiff

CRN

95256

 

Schedule

Tu Th††††††††† 1:00-2:20 pm††††† HEG 102

Distribution

OLD: E

NEW:

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society

An examination of Einsteinís life and work, the impact of his work on current world views, and some of the many controversies involved therein, using biography and popular descriptions of the relativity theories, atomic theories, and optical theories. We will compare the advantages of methods of positivism and realism in philosophy and of "internalism" and "externalism" in the history of science. Readings include some primary sources; secondary authors include Overbye, F`lsing and Holton. Accessible to students with no prior college‑level scientific or mathematical experience.