*There is a per semester fee of $100.00 for students taking one of more Film production classes.  This fee aids in the cost of equipment and supplies.

 

Course

FILM 109   The History and Aesthetics of Film

Professor

John Pruitt

CRN

95366

 

Schedule

Wed  9:30 - 12:30 pm   AVERY 217

Tu     7:00 - 10:00 pm   AVERY 110 (screening)

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: ANALYSIS OF ARTS

A one-semester survey course comprising weekly screenings and lectures designed for first-year students, especially those who are considering film as a focus of their undergraduate studies. Films by Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Renoir, Rossellini, Hitchcock, Deren, and others are studied. Readings of theoretical works by authors including Vertov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Munsterberg, Bazin, and Arnheim. This course is for first-year students only.

 

Course

FILM 167  Survey of Media Art: Popular Culture and Personal Vision

Professor

Ed Halter

CRN

95470

 

Schedule

Tu  1:30 –   4:30 pm   AVERY 217

Su  7:00 – 10:00 pm  AVERY (screening)

Distribution

OLD:  A

NEW: ANALYSIS OF ARTS

An introduction to the history and esthetics of the moving image through an exploration of the ways in which audio-visual technologies have been used to produce both mass-produced entertainment and works of individual expression, with a special focus on how modes of commercial and artistic production have influenced and reacted to one another. Topics include: experimental cinema, home movies, Hollywood and the avant-garde; documentary; television, video art, music video, and early electronic arts; radio, sound art, and Net Art; video games, homebrew games, and game art. This course is for first-year students only.

 

Course

FILM 201 A     Introduction to the  Moving Image:Video

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

CRN

95367

 

Schedule

Wed             9:30 - 12:30 pm    AVERY

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

Introduction to the basic problems (technical and theoretical) related to film and/or electronic motion picture production. Coupled with Film 202 (offered in Spring), this course is designed to be taken in the sophomore year and leads to a spring Moderation project in the Film and Electronic Arts Program.

Prerequisite: a 100 or 200- level course in Film or Video History.

 

Course

FILM 201 B    Introduction to the Moving Image: Film

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

CRN

95368

 

Schedule

Th               10:00 -1:00 pm      AVERY

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

See description above.

 

Course

FILM 201 C  Introduction to the Moving Image: Film

Professor

Peter Hutton

CRN

95369

 

Schedule

Th               1:30 -4:30 pm       AVERY

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

See description above.

 

Course

FILM 201 D     Introduction to the  Moving Image:Video

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

CRN

95471

 

Schedule

Wed             1:00 – 4:00 pm     AVERY

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

See description above.

 

Course

FILM 204   Documentary History

Professor

Peggy Ahwesh

CRN

95370

 

Schedule

Th     3:00 -5:00 pm  AVERY 217

Wed  7:00 - 10:00 pm  AVERY 110 (screening)

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: ANALYSIS OF ARTS

The course provides a historical overview and critique of the documentary form, with examples from ethnographic film, social documentary, cinema verité, propaganda films, and travelogues. The class investigates the basic documentary issue of truth and/or objectivity and critiques films using readings from feminist theory, cultural anthropology, general film history/theory, and other areas.

 

Course

FILM 211   Screenwriting I

Professor

Marie Regan

CRN

95365

 

Schedule

Tu               1:30 -3:50 pm       AVERY 338

Distribution

OLD: B/F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

An intensive workshop for committed writers/cineasts. From an idea to plot, from an outline to full script – character development and dramatic/cinematic structure. Continuous analysis of students’ work in a seminar setting. Students who wish to participate in this workshop should have a demonstrable background in film or in writing, and be able to share their work with others. Limited enrollment, priority given to Sophomores and Juniors, or by permission of the professor.  Submission of work and/or an interview prior to registration is recommended.

 

Course

FILM 239   Asian Cinema

Professor

Jean Ma

CRN

95362

 

Schedule

Mon   1:30 -4:20 pm     AVERY 110

Th      7:00 - 10:00 pm  AVERY 110 (screening)

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: ANALYSIS OF ARTS / RETHINKING DIFFERENCE

Cross-listed:  Asian Studies

This course will concentrate on the feature film production of Japan, China, and India. In addition to the fundamental goal of teaching students to appreciate a range of unfamiliar film texts, the course seeks to develop an understanding of the changing place of cinema in a wider cultural landscape. For example, the role of cinema in promoting national citizenship, the relation between commercial and non-commercial film production, and the importance of transnational and subnational conditions of film reception in the development of film culture. The course hopes to encourage students who have already developed an interest in Asian Studies to include film in their thinking. Enrollment preference will be given to students in film studies or Asian studies.

Course

FILM 280   Designed Obstacles and Spontaneous Response

Professor

Joan Tewkesbury

CRN

95475

 

Schedule

Th       1:30 – 5:30 pm  AVERY

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

A class created to explore the process of story or script development through spontaneous written response to assigned problems, situations, complications and possibilities. The purpose:  To unhinge caution and access story by putting aside logic and judgment in the initial stages of creating an idea, character and plot. Later in the semester, elements of structure, balance, collaboration and evaluation will be added to the mix. All assignments are handwritten in class and read aloud.  No computers as work is sometimes handed off around the room. Think of it as a scavenger hunt for the imagination. Open to all students interested in writing for Literature, Theater or Film.

 

Course

FILM / IA 301   MC:Live Video and Systems of  Surveillance

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

CRN

95396

 

Schedule

Tu               1:30 -4:30 pm       AVERY 116

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

Cross-listed Human Rights, Science, Technology & Society

This is a course intended to give students a better understanding of live video production as a vehicle for artistic expression. Course participants develop ways of working with video's most unique property: its ability to produce an immediate and continuous stream of images and sounds. Surveillance, streaming media, spinning, call-in talk shows, and cell phone usage have primed audiences and spectators to expect immediate access to and feedback from their media. How does the media artist respond? Course participants will work on individual projects using cameras, monitors, switchers, surveillance systems, and software-based video mixers. We will also work collectively to produce one live piece which will be broadcast to an audience. In addition, we will carry on a continued discussion about the larger cultural and psychological impact of live video production. This conversation will be supplemented by readings and viewings of work by Nam Jun Paik, Richard Serra, Dan Graham, Rosalind Krauss, Raymond Carver, Julia Scher, the Surveillance Camera Players, and others. Please contact goss@bard.edu for information.

 

Course

FILM 307   Landscape and Film

Professor

Peter Hutton

CRN

95371

 

Schedule

Fr                1:30 -4:30 pm       AVERY 217

Distribution

OLD: C

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

A class designed for Junior level film and video majors. The class will study and compare representations of the American landscape through the history of film and painting vs. the depiction of landscape and environmental issues manifest through television and video. Students will be required to complete a short film or video referencing these issues. Required reading: B. McKibbon’s The Age of Missing Information.

 

Course

FILM 318   Theories of Film

Professor

Jean Ma

CRN

95364

 

Schedule

Wed   1:30 -3:50 pm     AVERY 117

Mon   7:00 - 10:00 pm  AVERY 110 (screening)

Distribution

OLD: A

NEW: ANALYSIS OF ARTS

This course examines theories of cinematic form, style, ideology, and spectatorship through a focus upon the motif of the screen.  Topics will include illusionism (screen as window), psychoanalytic constructs of the gaze and subjectivity (the screen as mirror), apparatus theory, and media theory.  Alongside the readings, we will consider works that directly engage the materiality of the screen, the situation of projection, and the physicality of spectatorship; the screenings will emphasize avant-garde directors such as McCall, Conrad, Snow, Warhol, Rubin, and Beloff.

               

Course

FILM 338  Script to Screen

Professor

Marie Regan

CRN

95361

 

Schedule

Wed             9:30 -11:50 am      AVERY

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

This workshop is designed for Juniors and first semester Seniors in preparation for shooting an ambitious video or film project (narrative, experimental or documentary).  The first portion of the course will be devoted to script revision and development (with an emphasis on craft and production feasibility). Using the revised screenplay as a map, the second half of the course will be devoted to creating a detailed production plan to help you fully realize your vision on set. Students will be expected to present choices for media, stock, lighting, production design, editing strategies, sound, locations, tone and casting as an extension of the central ideas expressed in their scripts.  Students are expected to bring a draft of a script they plan to shoot to the first class meeting.

 

Course

FILM 362   Electronic Discourses: Art and the Internet

Professor

Jacqueline Goss

CRN

95363

 

Schedule

Mon             1:30 -4:30 pm       AVERY 333

Distribution

OLD: F

NEW: PRACTICING ARTS

Cross-listed: Science, Technology & Society

This course will examine the electronic networks of our contemporary digital culture, and its recent past, by exploring a variety of information systems, virtual communities, and on-line art projects. These various worlds, each distinct interactive models, will be examined critically in readings from cultural theory, policy, history, and aesthetics. How have virtual technologies transformed our experiences of language, reality, space, time, publicity and privacy, memory, and knowledge?  To answer these questions, we will produce a number of projects and do extensive reading in new media history and theory, studying things like: the World Wide Web, MOOs and MUDs, listservs, email and newsgroups, mobile phones, PDAs, pagers, and the Global Positioning System, among others. Each student will be expected to spend significant amounts of time on-line, to tackle several technologies as they apply to activities on the net and to design and mount an on-line project.  No special expertise with computers is required, but all work for the seminar will be produced using the digital media we study.